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Programs

Scientific Workshops @ ASH

The Scientific Workshops @ ASH are interactive discussions of the latest scientific developments in a particular field of hematology. The following information corresponds to the 2020 workshops expected to take place at the ASH Annual Meeting.

Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development

TBD

Co-Chairs:

Patricia Ernst, PhD
University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Aurora, CO
patricia.ernst@cuanschutz.edu

Ross Levine, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
leviner@mskcc.org

This workshop will examine the latest scientific findings in myeloid biology in a highly interactive environment that permits the exchange of ideas among investigators. It will focus on topics such as hematopoietic stem cell biology, leukemogenesis, cell signaling, transcription factors, epigenetic effects, and other topics related to myeloid biology. Each session leader will briefly summarize the current questions facing the field and then lead discussions on how best to answer those questions. New findings on novel techniques that provide insight into these questions will be an essential part of all discussions. The research presented at this workshop will also focus on the use of molecular biology and biochemistry tools, as well as animal models, to address the core topics. This workshop will not include any purely clinical, epidemiologic, or population-based approaches and will feature brief didactic sessions followed by a brief period for questions and answers.

Target Audience: This workshop is directed at laboratory-based investigators, and is meant to also attract young investigators, who will have an opportunity to interact directly with experts in the field. In addition, the broad-ranging content and highly interactive format of this workshop might also appeal to clinically oriented investigators.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the latest scientific developments in hematopoietic stem cell biology, leukemogenesis, cell signaling, transcription factors, epigenetic effects, and other topics related to myeloid biology.
  2. Have interactive presentations by world-class scientists.
  3. Provide young investigators opportunities to interact with world-renowned experts in the field.

Sessions and Moderators:

  • Stem Cells
    Eric Pietras, PhD
    University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
    Aurora, CO
    eric.pietras@cuanschutz.edu
  • Signaling and Developmental Hematopoiesis
    Claudia Lengerke, PhD
    University of Basel
    Basel, Switzerland 
    claudia.lengerke@unibas.ch
  • Myeloid Malignancies
    Ben Ebert, MD, PhD
    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Boston, MA 
    benjamin_ebert@dfci.harvard.edu
  • Transcription Factors
    Ulrich Steidl, MD, PhD
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center
    New York City, NY
    ulrich.steidl@einstein.yu.edu
  • New Investigators
    Nancy Speck, PhD
    University of Pennsylvania
    Philadelphia, PA
    nancyas@upenn.edu

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the moderators directly.

Scientific Workshop on Translational Molecular Diagnostics in Hematology

Thursday, December 3, 5-8pm ET (2-5pm PT)

Co-Chairs:

Piers Blombery, MD
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne, Australia
piers.blombery@petermac.org

Torsten Haferlach, MD
Munich Leukemia Laboratory
Munich, Germany
torsten.haferlach@mll.com

The detection of important genomic abnormalities in hematology (both malignant and non-malignant) to improve diagnosis and inform treatment decisions in the diagnostic laboratory has increased exponentially over the past few years. Accredited (ISO15189) diagnostic laboratories have now translated a range of complex testing across the spectrum of hematologic conditions from targeted panel testing to whole genome/transcriptome sequencing. Indeed, diagnostic laboratories are now true translational laboratories at the forefront of technological developments and making important and novel research discoveries.

Diagnostic laboratories around the world are at different stages of implementation of this complex testing and are individually confronting recurring issues including: (1) choice of technology (e.g. library preparation technology, next generation sequencing instrumentation, etc.); (2) development and implementation of appropriate bioinformatics processes; (3) standardization of variant curation, (4) dealing with novel findings; and (5) training an appropriate workforce. Diagnostic laboratories have navigated these challenges individually and as a result there is now significant heterogeneity in diagnostic practice which may act as a barrier for providing optimal patient care.

This workshop will focus on the practice of diagnostic genomics and how it is delivered and utilized in the real world. In addition, current attempts at process harmonization, technological developments and real-world genomic discoveries will be spotlighted in a highly interactive format including a molecular tumor board, guided database tours, and a showcase of novel tools.

Target Audience: This workshop is directed at those that are involved in both the delivery of molecular diagnostics as well as the end-users. As such the workshop will be relevant to those in a range of specialities and subspecialties including clinical hematologists, hematopathologists, molecular pathologists, medical laboratory scientists, clinical bioinformaticians/computational biologists, genetic counsellors and basic/translational researchers.

Objectives:

  1. To provide an interactive forum to discuss, progress and educate a broad audience around the current state of molecular diagnostics in hematology and the translation of novel technologies into routine use for patient care.
  2. Demonstrate and showcase a range of approaches from laboratories around the world to provide complex molecular testing including validation of new technologies and development of novel bioinformatic and clinical informatic software and process.
  3. Consolidate current collaborations as well as encouraging and fostering new interactions and collaborations of those in the field of molecular diagnostics around the world in order to harmonize approaches to mutual challenges in the area.
  4. Identify key shared challenges and develop a plan for collaborative solutions and future directions that advance the field of molecular diagnostics in hematology.

Sessions:

  • Real World Diagnostic Genomics
  • Novel Genomic Observations: Tools and Technology from the Diagnostic Laboratory Showcase
  • Big Data: An Interactive and Expert Guided Deep Dive into Publicly Available Genomic Data
  • Variant Curation: How Should We Interpret What We Find?
  • Molecular Tumor Board

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

If you are interested in presenting at any of the above sessions, please contact Piers Blombery (piers.blombery@petermac.org) directly.

Scientific Workshop on Tumor Immune Interactions in Lymphoid Malignancies

Wednesday, December 2nd, 10-1pm ET (7-10am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Stephen M. Ansell, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester MN
ansell.stephen@mayo.edu

Ronald Levy, MD
Stanford University
Stanford, CA
levy@stanford.edu

The area of immunotherapy in lymphoid malignancies has exploded in recent years. Multiple new immune therapies are in development in lymphoproliferative diseases, and this exciting progress has been due to an increased understanding of the tumor microenvironment and tumor-immune interactions in these diseases. This proliferation of scientific knowledge has led to multiple potential new treatments, including new immune checkpoint blockade therapies, novel T-cell approaches, agents targeting monocytes, and macrophages, as well as new approaches inhibiting immune receptors and cytokine signaling.

The workshop’s aim is to have scientists, translational researchers, and clinicians “hear it here first” when it comes to the next big thing in the management of lymphoid diseases. This workshop will be highly interactive and somewhat speculative (though based on science), with a strong focus on future translation of immune-related research into the clinic.

Target Audience: The target audience for this workshop is laboratory-based investigators who are interested in lymphoid biology. The workshop’s presentations and discussions focus solely on the basic science surrounding the development of lymphoid malignancies; there are no presentations on clinical/treatment strategies. Attendees benefit from interactive presentations by world-class scientists. The workshop reinforces the appeal of attending the ASH annual meeting by scientists from around the world, and it can serve as an introduction to the scientific content that will be presented at the ASH annual meeting.

Objectives:

  1. Highlight novel basic science and translational immune research in lymphoid malignancies that are likely to translate in the near future to clinically relevant therapies, biomarkers, or correlative science.
  2. Feature new methods of immune monitoring, as well as potential future therapies or therapeutic targets that are likely to be important in lymphoid malignancies.

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

If you would like to suggest a topic or a speaker for this workshop, please complete the suggested topic form and submit it to the Co-chairs directly no later than September 1, 2020.

Scientific Workshop on Infectious Disease and Coagulation

Wednesday, December 2nd, 10-1pm ET (7-10am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Amanda B. Payne, PhD MPH
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, GA
ABPayne@cdc.gov

Robert F. Sidonio Jr. MD, MSc.
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, GA
Robert.sidonio.jr@emory.edu

Shannon Meeks MD
Emory University and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, GA
smeeks@emory.edu

W. Craig Hooper, PhD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta, GA
woh1@cdc.gov

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for ongoing information-sharing between hematologists, infectious disease experts, immunologists, coagulation laboratorians, and public health officials. Severe COVID-19 is often marked by an inflammatory response that leads to coagulation abnormalities and increased risk of venous and arterial clotting abnormalities. This inflammatory response and subsequent perturbations in hemostasis is not limited to COVID-19 and has been seen in the context of other viral and bacterial infections. Furthermore, the increased risk of venous and arterial clotting abnormalities is known to occur in the context of infectious disease and often requires anti-thrombotic treatment considerations.

This workshop will provide a forum for experts in a variety of fields to share information at the intersection of coagulation and infectious disease, highlighting similarities and differences between COVID-19 and previously studied infections. The workshop will be a broad-reaching session that will cover basic science, clinical translation, and public health impact – providing attendees with the opportunity to better understand the potential biological mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of COVID-19, how understanding those biologic mechanisms may be able to improve patient care, and how modifications in patient care may be able to affect public health.

Target Audience: The target audience for this workshop will be consultant hematologists providing care for patients with underlying infections, particularly those with a specific interest in understanding the pathophysiology of the immunohemostatic response in the context of infection and those with interest in applying knowledge of pathophysiology to improve treatment.

Objectives:

  1. Increase understanding of pathophysiology underlying the immunohemostatic response in the context of infectious disease.
  2. Share information regarding therapeutic options to prevent and/or treat aberrant immunohemostatic responses to infectious pathogens.
  3. Provide a forum for cross-talk between experts in a variety of fields, including hematology, immunology, laboratory science, and public health, so that relevant information is made available to all parties charged with responding to infectious disease outbreaks linked to coagulation abnormalities.

Sessions:

  • The Immunohemostatic Response to Infection (Overview)
    • Example: Dengue Fever
    • Example: Malaria
    • Example: COVID-19
  • Prevention and Treatment of Adverse Hemostatic Outcomes in Infectious Disease
  • The Role of the Coagulation Laboratory in Treating the infectious Disease Patient
  • Monitoring for Adverse Hemostatic Outcomes at the Population Level

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

Scientific Workshop on Germline Predisposition to Hematopoietic Malignancies and Bone Marrow Failure

Friday, December 4, 10-1pm ET (7-10 am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Lucy A. Godley, MD, PhD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
lgodley@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu

Marcin W. Wlodarski, MD, PhD
St. Jude Children’s Hospital
Memphis, TN &
University of Freiburg
Freiburg, Germany
marcin.wlodarski@stjude.org

This workshop will review the latest advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying germline predisposition to hematopoietic malignancies and bone marrow failure. Talks will concentrate on emerging data regarding recognized syndromes as well as novel susceptibility syndromes. Presentations will update attendees on the work of the ASH-ClinGen sponsored Myeloid Malignancy Variant Curation Expert Panel, which is providing gene-specific rules for functional annotation of RUNX1 and GATA2 variants. This year, there will also be an in-depth discussion about the new biology associated with deleterious germline SAMD9/SAMD9L variants.

Target Audience: Given the increasing number of recognized syndromes, and the existence of new initiatives, this workshop will appeal to a multidisciplinary audience from many countries.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss on-going research efforts and unique scientific platforms being used to study germline susceptibility syndromes.
  2. To facilitate international collaborations among experts in the field.
  3. Promote junior scientists.
  4. Discuss novel entities and new aspects of known germline susceptibility syndromes.
  5. Educate ASH members who are clinicians on testing standards and establish a network of specialist providers for consultations and transitioning of patients.
  6. Address an ethical question regarding the care of germline mutation carriers.

Sessions and Moderators:

  • Modeling Germline Predisposition Syndromes in Vitro and in Vivo
    Anupriya Agarwal, PhD
    Oregon Health & Science University
    Portland, OR

    Emery Bresnick, PhD
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Madison, WI
  • SAMD9/SAMD9L Syndrome: Clinical and Biological Aspects
    Taizo Nakano, MD
    Children’s Hospital Colorado
    Aurora, Co

    Miriam Erlacher, MD
    University Hospital of Freiburg
    Freiburg, Germany
  • International Collaborations and Efforts for Gene Variant Curation
    Lea Cunningham, MD
    National Institutes of Health
    Bethesda, MD

    Csaba Bodor, PhD
    Semmelweis University
    Budapest, Hungary
  • Socioeconomic Considerations and Quality of Life Issues in Patients with Germline Predisposition
    Mrinal Patnaik, MD, MBBS
    Mayo Clinic
    Rochester, MN

    Tim Ripperger, MD, PhD
    Hannover Medical School
    Hannover, Germany
  • Pathogenesis of Emerging Syndromes
    Marcela Cavalcante, PhD
    University of Sao Paulo
    Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Hideki Muramatsu, MD, PhD
    Nagoya University
    Nagoya, Japan
  • Exciting New Research Findings
    Katherine Calvo, MD, PhD
    National Institutes of Health
    Bethesda, MD

    Devendra Hiwase, MD, MBBS
    SA Pathology
    Adelaide, Australia

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

Scientific Workshop on Hematology and Pregnancy

Friday, December 4, 10-1pm ET (7-10 am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Henny Billett, MD
Montefiore Medical Center
Bronx, NY
hbillett@montefiore.org

Irina Murakhovskaya, MD
Montefiore Medical Center
Bronx, NY
imurakho@montefiore.org

Shannon Bates, MDCM, MSc
McMaster University
Hamilton, Ontario
batesm@mcmaster.ca

Women with hematologic conditions can face unique challenges during pregnancy. Understanding pathophysiology of pregnancy and associated hematologic changes is paramount in optimal management of patients with bleeding and coagulation disorders, sickle cell disease and thrombotic microangiopathies associated with pregnancy. This workshop will focus on recent insights on the role that the distinctive biology of pregnancy plays on development, diagnosis, clinical course, and treatment of hematologic disorders. The workshop’s interactive format will feature brief didactic presentations from speakers on key topics, followed by question and answer session. Audience polling questions will be utilized to facilitate the interactive nature of the workshop.

Target Audience: This workshop would appeal to a multidisciplinary audience of basic and laboratory-based investigators and clinician researchers with an interest in pregnancy and hematology. The wide-ranging content thematic focus would be of interest to students, trainees and health care providers involved in care of pregnant and postpartum women.

Objectives:

  1. Provide a forum to present and discuss basic, translational and clinical investigations in the field of hematologic disorders in pregnancy.
  2. Foster collaboration and networking and facilitate discussion between investigators focused on pre-clinical, translational, and clinical aspects of hematologic disorders in pregnancy.
  3. Provide junior investigators opportunities to present their research and interact with established experts in the field.

Sessions and Moderators:

  • Thrombosis and Bleeding in Pregnancy
    Moderator: Shannon Bates, MDCM, MSc
    McMaster University
    Hamilton, Ontario
    batesm@mcmaster.ca
  • Interplay of Pregnancy and Sickle Cell Disease
    Moderator: Caterina Minnitti, MD
    Montefiore Medical Center
    Bronx, NY
    caterina.minniti@einsteinmed.org
  • Complement Activation and Thrombotic Microangiopathies in Pregnancy
    Moderator: Fadi Fakhouri MD, PhD
    Université de Nantes
    Nantes, France
    fadi.fakhouri@univ-nantes.fr

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program of this workshop will be available in October.

If you want to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the Co-chairs directly.

Scientific Workshop on the Interplay between Coagulation and Malignancy

Thursday, December 3, 10-1pm ET (7-10 am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Lisa Baumann Kreuziger, MD, MS
Blood Research Institute, Versiti
Milwaukee, WI
lisakreuziger@versiti.org

Jeffrey Zwicker, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, MA
jzwicker@bidmc.harvard.edu

This interactive workshop will address gaps in knowledge and ongoing investigations into the role of micro RNAs in cancer associated thrombosis, how the coagulation system affects cancer progression, and modeling of cancer associated thrombosis. Laboratory-based research and clinical biomarker studies will be the focus of the research presented.

The workshop will be divided into sessions with 3-4 talks per session. Each talk will last for 10 minutes with 10 minutes for discussion to promote interaction and collaboration. Given the desire for novel areas of investigation to be presented, presentations will be solicited using the form below.

Target Audience: The workshop is directed at basic and translational investigators interested in the mechanisms of thrombosis in cancer patients and how thrombosis may influence the progression of cancer. The interactive format and potential for identification of collaborators may also be of interest to clinically oriented investigators. We encourage participation by junior and senior investigators to facilitate mentoring opportunities also.

Objectives:

  1. To provide a unique forum to discuss the latest scientific developments in cancer and thrombosis.
  2. To enhance current collaborations, develop new collaborations, and provide opportunities for interaction between junior and established investigators in cancer and thrombosis.

Sessions

  • MicroRNA and Role in Cancer Associated Thrombosis
  • Interplay Between Coagulation and Solid Tumor Progression
  • Modeling Predictors and Outcomes in Cancer Associated Thrombosis
  • Late-Breaking Research Presentations

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required. Speakers and session moderators must follow ASH’s abstract embargo policy found on the ASH website under submission policy (i.e., data from an abstract being featured at the Annual Meeting can be previewed/referenced at the workshop but not presented).

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

Speaker Request Form

If you are interested in speaking during this workshop (specifically in session #4), please complete the form and submit it to the Co-chairs directly using the email addresses provided.

Scientific Workshop on Hematology and Aging: Exploring biomarkers, CHIP, CAR-T and Clotting

Thursday, December 3, 5-8 pm ET (2-5pm PT)

Co-Chairs:

Ashley Rosko, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus Ohio
Ashley.Rosko@osumc.edu

Andrew Artz, MD
City of Hope
Duarte, CA
aartz@coho.org

Older adults with hematologic disorders are a growing demographic, where the aging population is understudied and vulnerable to both cancer- and age-related morbidity and mortality. Improving the approach to older adult cancer care requires appreciation of the basic science of aging as well as differences in disease diagnosis, response, and tolerance to treatment. Understanding the impact of aging on hematologic disease pathogenesis, response to treatment, and tolerance of therapy is an emerging area of science. This workshop aims to highlight key scientific advances in the aging and hematology field, set in the context of both non-malignant and malignant hematologic disorders. In addition, the workshop aims to partner the aging investigators within ASH with key participants in the geoscience community to advance research and improve outcomes for older adults with hematologic disorders.

Target Audience: The target audience includes laboratory-based investigators and clinician investigators with an interest in aging and hematology. However, the wide-ranging content, thematic focus, and interactive format may appeal to a broader audience including young investigators.

Objectives:

  1. Provide a forum within ASH for presentation of novel research related to the biology of aging and hematologic disorders.
  2. Exploration of aging biomarker integration and identification of new approaches needed to answer scientific queries evaluating the intersection of hematologic disorders and aging.
  3. Foster collaboration and engagement among aging scientists and investigators targeting thrombosis and aging.

Sessions and Moderators:

  • CHIPing Away at the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche (This session will include talks on hematopoietic stem cell niche, stem cell aging, and CHIP.)
    Heidi Klepin, MD
    Wake Forest Baptist Health
    Winston-Salem, NC
  • Biomarkers of Aging (This session will include talks on molecular biomarkers of aging, incorporation in clinical trial design, novel approach to aging metrics.)
    Tanya Wildes, MD
    Washington University School of Medicine
    St. Louis, MO

    Melissa Loh, MD
    University of Rochester
    Rochester, NY
  • Chimeric Antigen T-Cells (This session will include talks on mechanisms of CAR-T toxicity among populations and defects in aged CAR-T cell function.)
    Rebecca Olin, MD
    University of California - San Francisco
    San Francisco, CA
  • Thrombosis + Aging (This session will focus on the inflammation and role of thrombosis in Aging and hematologic disorders.)
    Michelle Lavin, MB BCh, PhD
    Royal College of Surgeons
    Dublin, Ireland

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

For questions regarding the workshop, please contact the Co-chairs directly.

Scientific Workshop on Immune Profiling and Minimal Residual Disease Testing in Multiple Myeloma

Thursday, December 3, 10-1pm ET (7-10 am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Philip McCarthy, MD
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center
Buffalo, NY
philip.mccarthy@roswellpark.org

Saad Usmani, MD
Levine Cancer Institute/Atrium Health
Charlotte, NC
saad.usmani@atriumhealth.org

This workshop, organized by the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) Myeloma Intergroup, continues the yearly presentations of the latest scientific translational findings in the immunology and molecular biology of plasma cell disorders (PCDs) with emphasis on multiple myeloma and related monoclonal plasma cell diseases.

The workshop consists of 4 sessions with each session featuring four to five 10-minute basic science, translational and clinical presentations. Each session will be chaired by a leader who will summarize the current state of the field and facilitate discussion with the audience and the speakers.

Target Audience: This workshop is directed toward basic science, clinical, and translational investigators in the field of PCD. It is designed to be interactive with an emphasis on understanding the biology of PCD so as to develop new translational strategies to bring to the clinic from the laboratory. Trainees and junior investigators are encouraged to attend this workshop so as to interact with experts in PCD.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the latest scientific developments in PCDs with an emphasis on the immunology and molecular biology of PCDs.
  2. Presentation of the most current trial results and issues related to IP and MRD testing in MM
  3. Understanding Trial Design for future trials and FDA and EMA approval of new MM therapies
  4. Developing new strategies for IP and MRD testing in MM, especially for standardizing testing for
    widespread applicability
  5. Encourage interaction of investigators from around the world.
  6. Encourage trainees and investigators to participate in the discussion of presentations of experts in the field of PCDs.

Sessions:

  • Integrating Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) Testing into Clinical Trial Design and Clinical Practice (This session will focus on the use of MRD as a potential surrogate endpoint for clinical outcome.)
  • The Molecular and Immunobiology of Disease Evolution and Progression in Multiple Myeloma (MM) (This session will focus on the progression and evolution of MM.)
  • Adaption of Next Generation Sequencing, Next Generation Flow Cytometry, and CyTOF: Diverse Ways of Detection (This session will focus on the use of new technologies for detecting clonal plasma cell disorders and the immune environment that occurs during PCDs.)
  • CAR-T and Other Cellular Therapy for Multiple Myeloma (This session will focus on the use of cellular therapies for multiple myeloma treatment and predictors of response.)

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

For questions regarding the workshop, please contact the Co-chairs directly and cc Amy Foley at afoley@nmdp.org.

Scientific Workshop on ‘Omics in Sickle Cell Disease

Friday, December 4, 10-1pm ET (7-10 am PT)

Co-Chairs:

Marilyn J. Telen, MD
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC
marilyn.telen@duke.edu

Allison Ashley-Koch, PhD
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC
allison.ashleykoch@duke.edu

Victor Gordeuk, MD
University of Illinois Chicago
Chicago, IL
vgordeuk@uic.edu

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a single gene disease with extraordinarily heterogeneous outcomes. Patients have a broad spectrum of both acute and chronic disease sequelae, with attendant damage to multiple organ systems that threaten quality of life and shorten survival. Patients also show variable responses to multiple disease therapies. Initially, genetic studies started to shed light on why different patients experienced such variable disease courses, suffering from stroke, nephropathy, and cardiopulmonary disease, among others. As genetic studies have progressed from candidate SNP analysis to GWAS to whole genome sequencing, proteomics and metabolomics have also started to inform our understanding of disease pathogenesis and provide means of risk assessment. In addition, the NHLBI TOPMed program has provided whole genome sequencing for several large SCD cohorts and supports collaborative data sharing and analysis.

This workshop will now bring together people with a variety of scientific and analytical expertise and present progress to date as well as new methodologies for interpreting and integrating results obtained through various ‘omics studies. Information from these studies will not only be of interest to basic investigators striving to improve our understanding of SCD pathophysiology but also to clinical investigators interested in appropriate risk stratification and more efficient clinical study design.

Target Audience: The target audience is primarily basic and translational investigators in the field of sickle cell disease, although investigators focusing on other hemoglobinopathies and other rare single gene hematologic disorders (such as Diamond-Blackfan Anemia) should also find it informative, as will clinical investigators. The audience will hear about progress being made in using ‘omics technologies to understand SCD pathophysiology and identify potential therapeutic avenues. Exciting new analytic approaches integrating various ‘omics will be highlighted, making this workshop of great interest to early career investigators learning how to use ‘omics in their focus area. Basic investigators and clinical investigators focusing on inherited hematologic diseases are likely to find the presented research data of great interest, while methodologic presentations will be especially valuable to early career basic and translational investigators and more seasoned investigators interested in extending their work using ‘omic technologies.

Objectives:

  1. Share data demonstrating how various ‘omics technologies are contributing to our understanding of SCD pathophysiology.
  2. Raise awareness of how ‘omics technologies can inform further basic research, drug development, and clinical trial design in inherited hematologic diseases.
  3. Increase research activities using ‘omics in both basic and clinical research in hematology.

Sessions:

  • 'Omics technologies and analytic methodologies: What kind of data can we get and what can we do with it?
  • Cardiovascular and renal sequelae of SCD: What are ‘omics telling us so far?
  • Neurological disease and Pain: Do ‘omics help us connect the central and peripheral nervous systems?

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.

Scientific Workshop on Epidemiology - Disparities in Hematologic Diseases: Risk, Outcomes and Care

Thursday, December 3, 5-8pm ET (2-5pm PT)

Co-Chairs:

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA
wcozen@usc.edu

James Foran, MD
Mayo Clinic
Jacksonville, FL
Foran.James@mayo.edu

Neil Zakai, MD
The University of Vermont Medical Center
Burlington, VT
neil.zakai@med.uvm.edu

James R. Cerhan, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Cerhan.James@mayo.edu

This workshop fills a critical gap in the meeting in the areas of epidemiology and population science. The workshop this year focuses on racial/ethnic disparities in non-malignant and malignant hematologic diseases, covering the spectrum from descriptive epidemiology on risk and survival patterns by race/ethnicity, to underlying causes of racial/ethnic disparities. The workshop will provide a forum for epidemiologists, clinicians and basic scientists interested in disparities to come together to present and discuss current knowledge and future directions in this timely area. The theme is highly relevant for ASH to incorporate consideration of disparities into hematologic research and clinical applications going forward.

The workshop is divided into three sessions, lymphoid and myeloid malignant hematology, non-malignant hematology including venous and arterial thrombosis, hematologic autoimmune disorders and hemostasis and a session on epidemiological aspects of hematology-related disparities in the setting of COVID-19 infection. The talks include descriptive patterns, risk factors and biological mechanisms related to disparities, participation in trials, comorbidities and other relevant issues around race and outcomes. There will be time allocated for discussion following each of the talks.

Specific topics will include updates on disparities in risk and survival patterns for lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms from SEER and WHO data, molecular epidemiology studies of genetic and environmental risk factors for lymphoid and myeloid malignancies and the extent to which these explain disparities, differences in coagulopathies by race/ethnicity and how much is explained by access to care vs. underlying biology, and racial/ethnic differences in immunity and comorbidities as underlying causes of differences in COVID-19 outcomes, among others.

Target Audience: The target audience comprises trainees and researchers interested in learning more about disparities in the context of population science and how the issues around disparities can be applied to basic science and clinical research, clinical care and health policy. In addition, epidemiologists and other population scientists working in hematology will benefit by hearing the latest up to date research presentations and interacting with colleagues.

Objectives:

  1. To provide a unique forum at the ASH annual meeting to present and discuss advances in the field of epidemiology of hematologic diseases, with a focus on disparities.
  2. To provide information on areas where there is a knowledge gap and where more research is needed.
  3. To promote research on disparities among investigators with established research programs.
  4. To promote interest among trainees for consideration of this area of study.
  5. To facilitate discussion with the end-goal of stimulating new collaborations in the areas of disparities that advance the study of epidemiology and disease control.

Sessions and Moderators:

All are welcome to attend this workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

A detailed program for this workshop will be available in October.