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Programs

Scientific Workshops

The Scientific Workshops are interactive discussions of the latest scientific developments in a particular field of hematology. The following information corresponds to the 2022 workshops expected to take place at the ASH annual meeting. Each workshop will take place on Friday, December 9 in person, and will also be broadcast simultaneously on the virtual platform. 

All are welcome to attend each workshop. There is no additional fee, but ASH annual meeting registration is required.

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

Clinical trials are an essential component of providing care to patients with benign and malignant hematologic disorders. Access to trials allows enhancing discovery of new therapeutics, providing access to precision medicine approaches and early screening and detection. Despite unique opportunities and advantages of enrollment, a minority of patients with hematologic disorders participate. While several factors contribute, knowledge of and access to trials represents a critical barrier for many patients.

Decentralized clinical trials (DCT) are studies where some or all components of enrollment, assessments, and/or visits are conducted at locations other than investigator site. DTCs involve a combination of participant-centered design with innovative technologies including telemedicine, mobile/local HCPs, local labs/imaging, and home delivery of investigational products. This may provide advantages compared to traditional trials including participant enrollment, retention, diversity, trials more representative of real-world use. Despite FDA prioritization, implementation of DCTs has been a slow adaptation.

This workshop will define DCTs and convene key stakeholders with the goal of fostering collaborations in DCT, identifying successful approaches to DCT, and discussing areas for continued access and improvement including utilization of successful and unsuccessful methods that. Knowledge gained from early clinical experiences in DCT has the potential to help inform future basic/translational research.

Workshop Schedule


Moderators:

Neil Goldenberg, MD, PhD
All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine
Saint Petersburg,  FL

Kami J. Maddocks, MD
Ohio State University Hospital
Columbus,  OH

Speakers:

Nicole Gormley, MD
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Bethesda,  MD
Keynote Presentation

Nicole Gormley, MD
US Food and Drug Administration
Silver Spring,  MD
Keynote Q&A

Moderators:

Kami J. Maddocks, MD
Ohio State University Hospital
Columbus,  OH

Michael R. DeBaun, MD,MPH
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
Nashville,  TN

Speakers:

Kami J. Maddocks, MD
Ohio State University Hospital
Columbus,  OH
Moderator Introduction

Grzegorz S. Nowakowski, MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Why and How We Can Benefit from Decentralized Clinical Trials: Consortium Perspective

Lilli Petruzzelli, MD, PhD
Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research
Wilmington,  DE
Why and How We Can Benefit from DCT: Industry/Trial Sponsor Perspective

Caterina P Minniti, MD
Einstein College of Medicine
Chevy Chase,  MD
How to Conduct a DCT: Lessons Learned from an Investigator’s Experience

Moderators:

Neil Goldenberg, MD, PhD
All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine
Saint Petersburg,  FL

Lillian Sung, MD, PhD
The Hospital for Sick Children
Toronto,  ON, CAN

Speakers:

Neil Goldenberg, MD, PhD
All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine
Saint Petersburg,  FL
Moderator Introduction

Uma Borate, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Innovative Participant-Centered Trial Design

Lisa Rodriguez, PhD
Food and Drug Administration
Washington,  DC
Maintenance of Data Quality, Integrity and Use

Neal J Meropol
Flatiron Health
New York,  NY
Decentralization and Digitalization: Improving Access with Technology

Moderators:

Joseph R. Mikhael, MD
Mayo Clinic in Arizona
Scottsdale,  AZ

Martin Dreyling, MD
Klinikum Der Universitaet Muenchen-Campus Grosshadern
Munich,  Germany

Speakers:

Joseph R. Mikhael, MD
Mayo Clinic in Arizona
Scottsdale,  AZ
Moderator Introduction

Rebekah Angrove, PhD
Patient Advocate Foundation
Hampton,  VA
Patient-Centric Goals of DCT

Vera Ignjatovic, PhD,BSc
Johns Hopkins All Children's
St. Petersburg,  FL
Taking DCT from Bedside to Bench

Dickran Kazandjian, MD
National Institutes of Health
Miami,  FL
DCT: Multicenter and International Experience

Moderators:

Neil Goldenberg, MD, PhD
All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine
Saint Petersburg,  FL

Kami J. Maddocks, MD
Ohio State University Hospital
Columbus,  OH

Fangxin Hong, PhD
Pfizer
Cambridge,  MA

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

With growing indications for CAR T-cell therapy and evolving toxicity profiles, there is an urgent and unmet need to investigate emerging adverse events beyond the standard paradigm of CRS and ICANS. Particularly, as novel antigen targeting is increasingly explored and engineering of CAR T-cell constructs advances, the pathophysiology underlying those novel inflammatory responses warrants further study.

On behalf of the ASH Subcommittee on Emerging Gene and Cell Therapy, thereby this workshop will focus on the translation elements of the following unusual and complicated CAR T-cell toxicities: 1) Unique and rare presentations of immune effector cell associated neurotoxicity syndrome (ICANS) and on-target/off-tumor toxicity considerations; 2) CAR T-cell toxicities and associations with cytokine profiling and the gut microbiome; and 3) CAR T-cell associated coagulopathies and cytopenias.

This workshop is a next step in our efforts to develop awareness of emergent toxicities and bridge the gap from bedside to bench. Specifically, this workshop will focus on laboratory and translational studies to inform current and future areas of research on this topic.

By bringing together key leaders in basic and clinical CAR T-cell investigations, this workshop will serve as a platform for discussion of the science underscoring novel toxicities.

Workshop Schedule


Moderator:

Nirali N. Shah, MD
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda,  MD

Moderator:

Fabiana Perna, MD,PhD
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis,  IN

Speakers:

Fabiana Perna, MD,PhD
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis,  IN
Moderator Introduction

Samir Parekh, MD
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York,  NY
CAR T-Cell Neurotoxicity with BCMA Targeting

Fabiana Perna, MD,PhD
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis,  IN
Novel Targets and Off-Tumor Toxicities

Moderator:

Nirali N. Shah, MD
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda,  MD

Speakers:

Nirali N. Shah, MD
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda,  MD
Moderator Introduction

Caroline Diorio, MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, 
Cytokine Profiling and CAR T-Cell Toxicities

Melody Smith, MD,MS
Stanford University
Stanford,  CA
CAR T-Cells and the Gut Microbiome

Moderator:

Frederick L. Locke, MD
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Tampa,  FL

Speakers:

Frederick L. Locke, MD
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Tampa,  FL
Moderator Introduction

Rakesh P. Mehta, MD
Indiana University School of Medicine
Carmel,  IN
Tipping the Balance: Coagulopathies of CAR T-Cell Therapy

Marion Subklewe, MD
LMU University Hospital Munich
Muenchen,  Germany
Bone Marrow Dysfunction and Cytopenias

Moderator:

Nirali N. Shah, MD
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda,  MD

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

Gene editing has emerged as a great strategy to modify different cell types including hematopoietic cells. The advancement has led to the first gene editing clinical trials to correct different disorders affecting the hematopoietic system. Also, gene editing is proving to be a very potent strategy to eliminate some of the barriers that immunotherapy encounters (e.g: the generation of off the shelf CAR-T cells), thus expanding its application.

Although previous ASH meetings included sessions in Gene Editing, the field is evolving so quickly that a complete update in the field is required.

To this aim this workshop will be focused on the detail explanation of the most novel gene editing strategies described so far and their potential applications in the hematology field.

We will also update the most recent applications of ex vivo gene editing targeting hematopoietic stem cells and include a session focused on how immunotherapy can take advantage of gene editing to develop a new CAR generation. Special attention to new delivery systems for in vivo gene editing delivery of gene editing tools will be also presented.

Finally, safety studies to be performed before moving to the clinic will be discussed considering the FDA’s recently published draft guidance.

Workshop Schedule


Moderator:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain

Moderator:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain

Speakers:

Matthew H. Porteus, MD, PhD
Stanford Medical School
Stanford,  CA
Overview of Genome Editing Tools for on Target Editing and Off-Target Identification

Matthew H. Porteus, MD, PhD
Stanford Medical School
Stanford,  CA
Q&A

Moderator:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain

Speakers:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain
Moderator Introduction

Alessia Cavazza, PhD
University College London
London,  GBR
Targeted Gene Correction of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells for the Treatment of Wiskott - Aldrich Syndrome

TBD TBD
TBD
xx, 
Update in the Gene Editing Clinical Trials for B-Thal and SCD

Chang Li, PhD
University of Washington
Seattle,  WA
In Vivo Gene Editing in HSCs

Moderator:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain

Speakers:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain
Moderator Introduction

Waseem Qasim, MBBS,PhD
Great Ormond Street Biomedical Research Centre
LONDON,  ENG, United Kingdom
Development of Off the Shelf CAR T Cells

Katy Rezvani, MD
The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Improving CAR NK Activity By Gene Editing Approaches

Meisam Naeimi Kararoudi, PhD,DVM
Nationwide Children's Hospital
Columbus,  OH
Strategies to Avoid Fratricide in CAR Therapy

Moderator:

Matthew H. Porteus, MD, PhD
Stanford Medical School
Stanford,  CA

Speakers:

Matthew H. Porteus, MD, PhD
Stanford Medical School
Stanford,  CA
Moderator Introduction

Laura Sepp-Lorenzino, PhD
Intellia
Boston,  MA
Development of a Safety and Toxicology Package for Genome Editing of the Liver to Modulate Blood Proteins

Barbra Sasu, PhD
Allogene Therapeutics, Inc.
South San Francisco,  CA
Evaluation of an Unexpected Clinical Event in a Genome Editing Clinical Trial

Moderator:

Paula Rio, PhD
CIEMAT-Hematopoietic Innovative Therapies
MADRID,  Spain

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

Deleterious germline variants that confer susceptibility to hematopoietic malignancies (HM) and bone marrow failure (BMF) are recognized now as an important disease risk, with testing advocated by multiple clinical guidelines. However, the mechanisms by which these gene variants cause HMs and BMF are not understood fully. Prior Workshops have been extremely well attended and critical in fostering scientific work and collaborative projects in this area. Presentations at this Workshop will feature preclinical development of model organisms and mechanistic insights into pathogenesis of germline predisposition to HMs and BMF. This year, sessions will focus on models and mechanistic insights; clonal hematopoiesis and inflammation in patients with germline predisposition syndromes; a focused session on deleterious germline DDX41 variants; and discoveries of new predisposition disorders. Given the important role that this workshop has played in disseminating information about these disorders and engaging investigators from across the world to perform collaborative scientific work, we request support for a 7th workshop.

Workshop Schedule


Moderator:

Lucy A. Godley, MD, PhD
Univ. of Chicago Med. Ctr.
Chicago,  IL

Moderators:

David Wu, MD, PhD
University of Washington
Seattle,  WA

Charlotte M. Niemeyer
Albert-Ludwigs-Universitat Freiburg
Freiburg,  Germany

Speakers:

Usua Oyarbide, PhD
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland,  OH
Genetic Ablation of the sbds-efl1-eif6 Pathway Components Are Lethal and Not Salvageable By tp53 Mutants to Ribosome Synthesis

Usua Oyarbide, PhD
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland,  OH
Q&A

Mackenzie Bloom, MSc
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Mouse Model of Pathogenic ETV6 Germline Variant Reveals Loss of HSC Self Renewal and Increased Production of TNF

Mackenzie Bloom, MSc
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Q&A

Miriam Erlacher, MD, PhD
University of Freiburg
Freiburg,  Germany
Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Leukemia Is a Secondary Event after Bone Marrow Failure in Gata2 Haploinsufficient Mice

Miriam Erlacher, MD, PhD
University of Freiburg
Freiburg,  Germany
Q&A

Sherif Abdelhamed, PhD
Oregon Health Science University
Memphis,  TN
In Vivo Expression of Samd9l Mutation Impairs Hematopoiesis to Induce Bone Marrow Failure

Sherif Abdelhamed, PhD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Q&A

Vahid Pazhakh, PhD
Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute
Melbourne,  Australia
Reverse Genetic Approaches to Model Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome Candidate Variants in Zebrafish

Vahid Pazhakh, PhD
Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute
Melbourne,  Australia
Q&A

Moderators:

David J. Young, MD,PhD
National Institute of Health
Bethesda,  MD

Kelly L Bolton, MD
Washington University In St Louis
St Louis,  MO

Speakers:

David B. Beck
New York University School of Medicine
New York,  NY
UBA1 Mutations and the Role of Ubiquitylation in Bone Marrow Failure

David B. Beck
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
New York,  NY
Q&A

Anna Brown, PhD
Centre For Cancer Biology, SA Pathology/IMVS
Adelaide,  SA, Australia
Comparative Molecular and Clinical Features across Myeloid Predisposition Disorders, RUNX1db and Beyond

Anna Brown, PhD
Centre For Cancer Biology, SA Pathology/IMVS
Adelaide,  SA, Australia
Q&A

Fernanda Gutierrez-Rodrigues, PhD
National Institute of Health
Bethesda,  MD
Clonal Hematopoiesis in Telomere Biology Disorders

Fernanda Gutierrez-Rodrigues, PhD
National Institute of Health
Bethesda,  MD
Q&A

Michael Kessler, MD
Regeneron
Washington,  DC
Exome Sequencing of 628,388 Individuals Identifies Common and Rare Variant Associations with Clonal Hematopoiesis Phenotypes

Michael Kessler, MD
Regeneron
Washington,  DC
Q&A

Carmelo Gurnari, MD
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland,  OH
Germline and Somatic Mutations of DEAD and DEAH-Box Helicases in Myeloid Neoplasia

Carmelo Gurnari, MD
Department of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland,  OH
Q&A

Peng Li, MD, PhD
ARUP Laboratories, University of Utah
Salt Lake City,  UT
Early Detection of DDX41 Related Myeloid Neoplasm Using Immunophenotypic Profiling By Flow Cytometry

Peng Li, MD, PhD
ARUP Laboratories, University of Utah
Salt Lake City,  UT
Q&A

Moderators:

Amy M. Trottier, MD
QEII Health Sciences Centre/Dalhousie University
Halifax,  NS, Canada

Jennie Vagher, MS, CGC
Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah
SLC,  UT

Speakers:

Vincent-Philippe Lavallée, MD
CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center
Montréal,  QC, Canada
AML with Germline Variants in DNA Repair Genes Are Associated with Complex Karyotype and Display a Unique Drug Sensitivity Profile in Vitro

Vincent-Philippe Lavallée, MD
CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center
Montréal,  QC, Canada
Q&A

Trent Hall, PhD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Aberrant T-Cell Development in Children with Down Syndrome

Trent Hall, PhD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Q&A

Makiko Mochizuki-Kashio, PhD
Tokyo Women’s Medical University
Tokyo.,  Japan
Fanconi Anemia-Related Replication Stress Increases Cytosolic Activity

Makiko Mochizuki Kashio, PhD
Tokyo Women’s Medical University
Tokyo.,  Japan
Q&A

Jason N. Berman, MD
CHEO Research Institute
Ottawa,  ON, Canada
Loss of Dnajc21 Leads to Neutropenia and Metabolic Alterations in Zebrafish

Jason N. Berman, MD
CHEO Research Institute
Ottawa,  ON, Canada
Q&A

Lucy C. Fox, MBBS
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne,  Australia
The Under-Recognized Phenotype of Germline GATA1 Disease in Females

Lucy C. Fox, MBBS
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne,  Australia
Q&A

Nienke Van Engelen, MD
Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology
Utrecht,  Netherlands
A Novel Germline PAX5 Single Exon Deletion in a Pediatric Patient with B-Cell Leukemia

Nienke Van Engelen, MD
Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology
Utrecht,  Netherlands
Q&A

Jun Yen Ng
The Canberra Hospital
Canberra,  Australia
Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Multiple Solid Tumors in an Individual with Compound Heterozygous Deleterious FANCM Variants: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

Jun Yen Ng
The Canberra Hospital
Canberra,  Australia
Q&A

Taylor Walker
University of Chicago
Country Club Hills,  IL
Update on the Approaches for GATA2 and RUNX1 Variant Curations By the MM-VCEP

Mancy Shah
The University of Chicago
Chicago,  IL
Update on the Approaches for GATA2 and RUNX1 Variant Curations By the MM-Vcep

Taylor Walker
University of Chicago
Country Club Hills,  IL
Q&A

Moderators:

Sushree S Sahoo, PhD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN

Edward Chew, MBBS
Victorian Cancer Cytogenetics Service & Austin Health
Southbank,  Australia

Speakers:

Akiko Shimamura
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston,  MA
DPP9 Deficiency: An Inflammasomopathy Which Can be Rescued By Lowering NLRP1/IL-1 Signaling

Akiko Shimamura
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Q&A

Andres Jerez, MD,PhD
Servicio de Hematología y Oncología Médica, Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer, Centro Regional de Hemodonación, Universidad de Murcia, IMIB
Murcia,  Spain
Predisposition to Early-Onset Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome without a Pre-Existing Platelet Disorder or Organ Dysfunction: ERCC6L2 and Other DNA Repair Genes Dominant Role

Andres Jerez, MD,PhD
Hospital Universitario Morales Meseguer
Murcia,  Spain
Q&A

Carolin Escherich, MD
St. Jude Children’S Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Targeted Sequencing in Pediatric ALL Identifies Lineage-Specific Enrichment of TCF3 Germline Variants

Carolin Escherich, MD
St. Jude Children’S Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Q&A

Angelica Castano, MD
Hackensack Meridian Health Center for Discovery & Innovation
Nutley,  NJ
Validating Allele-Specific Methylation As a Signpost for Functional SNPs and Transcription Factor Binding Sites Underlying Multiple Myeloma Susceptibility Loci

Angelica Castano, MD
Hackensack Meridian Health Center for Discovery & Innovation
Nutley,  NJ
Q&A

Moderator:

Marcin W Wlodarski, MD, PhD
University of Freiburg
Freiburg,  Germany

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

Older adults with hematologic disorders are a growing demographic yet remain understudied and are vulnerable to both disease and age-related morbidity and mortality. Improving the approach to care for older adults with hematologic disorders requires a scientific understanding of the aging and hematologic process as it applies to disease development, response to therapy, and toxicities of treatment.

This workshop aims to highlight key scientific advances in the aging and hematology field. This is the only forum within ASH to provide an opportunity for researchers from varied disciplines to share and discuss new discoveries related to aging science. The novel workshop will focus on cellular regulation and processes suspected to influence aging such as DNA repair, stress response and inflammation and aging.

This years proposal enhances the long-standing focus on early career investigators by providing a dedicated session to showcase emerging leaders in hematology and aging. We continue our successful pairing of senior and early career moderators providing a mentored leadership opportunity.

The workshop is developed through a planning committee that engages the broader hematology and aging community, nationally and internationally. Workshop co-chairs rotate with a goal of mentoring early/mid-career investigators to lead.

Workshop Schedule


Moderators:

Heidi Klepin, MD, MS
Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Winston Salem,  NC

Ashley E. Rosko, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH

Moderators:

Andrew S. Artz, MD,MS
City of Hope
Duarte,  CA

Vijaya Raj Bhatt, MBBS, MS
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha,  NE

Speakers:

Lukasz P. Gondek, MD,PhD
Johns Hopkins
Baltimore,  MD
The Biological Consequences of Age-Related Clonal Hematopoiesis

Anthony D Ho, MD
Heidelberg University
Heidelberg,  Germany
Aberrations in Glycolytic Pathway of Senescent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells As Targets for Senolytic Therapy

Timothy S. Pardee, MD, PhD
Wake Forest Baptist Health Comprehensive Cancer Center
Winston Salem,  NC
The Effect of HSC Age on AML

Moderators:

Rebecca L. Olin, MD,MS
University of California San Francisco
San Francisco,  CA

Catherine Lai, MD, MPH
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA

Speakers:

Charlotte Hellmich, MBBChair
University of East Anglia
Norwich,  United Kingdom
Characterizing Mitochondrial Changes in the Aged HSC

Fulvio Massaro
Institut Jules Bordet (ULB)
Anderlecht,  Belgium
Impact of Ageing Mesenchymal Stromal Cells on the Polarization of Macrophages

Megan Weivoda, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Role of Senescence in Multiple Myeloma Tumorigenesis

Moderators:

Tanya Wildes, MD, MSc
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha,  NE

Victor Manuel Orellana-Noia, MD MSc
Emory University
Atlanta,  GA

Speakers:

Richard J. Lin, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York,  NY
Senescence Biomarkers in Hematologic Malignancy, Hematopoietic Transplantation, and Cellular Therapy

Melissa Loh, MBBCh
University of Rochester
Rochester,  NY
Epigenetic Ages in the Context of a Health Exercise Intervention for Myeloid Malignancies

Sarah Wall, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Biomarkers of Aging in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

Laura Cotano, RN
Hospital Universitario Rey Juan Carlos
Madrid,  Spain
Physical Exercise and Telemedicine Monitoring with Wearables in Older Patients with Hematological Malignancies

Moderators:

Michelle Lavin, MD,PhD,FRCPath
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Dublin,  Ireland

Nicolas Gallastegui Crestani, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH

Speakers:

Craig D. Seaman
University of Pittsburgh and Hemophilia Center of Western Pennsylvania
Warrendale,  PA
The Von Willebrand Disease Aging and Bleeding Correlation (VWD ABC) Study

Simon F De Meyer
KU Leuven Campus Kulak Kortrijk
Kortrijk,  Belgium
Targeting NETs in Ischemic Stroke

Evi X. Stavrou, MD
Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center
Cleveland,  OH
Thomboinflammation and Aging

Moderator:

Ashley E. Rosko, MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the second leading cause of death in patients with cancer and cancer patients are the highest risk group for developing VTE. Despite considerable epidemiologic research, the mechanism of thrombosis in cancer is poorly understood. The NIH has funded the CLOT Consortium to expand mechanistic investigation into the intersection between cancer and thrombosis. We successfully completed a workshop on the Interplay between Coagulation and Malignancy from 2019 -2021. We propose an interactive workshop to discuss gaps in knowledge and ongoing investigations into how the coagulation system affects cancer progression and how therapy can modulate risk in myeloproliferative neoplasms and solid tumors. Although didactic lectures about published information are planned during the ASH Annual meeting, short research presentations with equal focus on discussion will foster interactions between basic and translational researchers interested in cancer and thrombosis. This workshop will also provide a unique forum to discuss the mechanisms of thrombosis in hematologic malignancies, a topic that bridges malignant and non-malignant hematology within ASH.

Workshop Schedule


Moderators:

Lisa Baumann Kreuziger, MD
Versiti, Blood Research Institute
Milwaukee,  WI

Jeffrey Zwicker, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York City,  NY

Moderators:

Marvin T. Nieman, PhD
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland,  OH

Iberia Romina Sosa, MD, PhD
Fox Chase Cancer Center
Philadelphia,  PA

Speakers:

Elisabeth M. Battinelli, MD/PhD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Platelets and Cancer Immune Escape

Anne-Laure Papa
George Washington University
Washington,  DC
Platelet Decoys Inhibit Thrombosis and Prevent Metastatic Tumor Formation

Vahid Afshar-Kharghan, MD
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Platelet G Proteins and Tumor Growth

Moderators:

Nigel Mackman, PhD
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill,  NC

Howard Liebman, MD
University of Southern California
Los Angeles,  CA

Speakers:

Serena Lucotti, PhD
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York,  NY
Prothrombotic Extracellular Vesicle Niche in Cancer

Young Jun Shim
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland,  OH
Procoagulant Polyphosphate Expression on Extracellular Vesicles

Florian Moik
Medical University of Vienna
Vienna,  Austria
Extracellular Vesicle TF Activity and Mortality in Pancreatic Cancer

Michelle M. Luo, B.S.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill,  NC
Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Causes Bleeding Phenotype in Mice Associated with Loss of Procoagulant Activity and Increased Thrombomodulin Sensitivity

Moderators:

Nicole Kucine, MD,MS
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York,  NY

Craig M. Kessler, MD
Georgetown University Medical Centre
Washington,  DC

Speakers:

Joan D Beckman, MD,PhD
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis,  MN
How RBC and Endothelial Cell Interactions Influence Thrombosis in MPNs

Angela G Fleischman, MD,PhD
University of California, Irvine
Irvine,  CA
N-Acetylcystine Inhibition of Thrombosis in MPN Model

Roelof Hendrik Bekendam, MD,PhD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School
Boston,  MA
Platelet Dysfunction and Thrombosis in Myelofibrosis

Anandi Krishnan, PhD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Palo Alto,  CA
Platelet Molecular Profiling in Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: An International Collaborative

Moderators:

Lisa Baumann Kreuziger, MD
Versiti, Blood Research Institute
Milwaukee,  WI

Jeffrey Zwicker, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York City,  NY

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

In this workshop we will explore methods and examples of studies using AI, machine learning to better capture information efficiently from medical records, histopathological materials, and big data, and use of social media to expand participation and increase representativeness of underserved minorities. This session fills a critical gap not covered elsewhere in the meeting and provides a forum for discussion on a rapidly expanding use of digital technologies. There is great interest in this topic among hematologists for both clinical and research applications; this session focuses on applications for observational (epidemiological) studies of etiology, prognosis, and outcomes. Presentation of current knowledge and discussion around this theme are highly relevant for ASH in order to incorporate the most cutting-edge methods to hematology research. Moreover, we will cover the use of these technologies to improve inclusion of minority groups in observational studies. This meeting will enhance the overall ASH annual meeting by highlighting a timely and important topic for hematology, which will expand the translational impact of the research on the field.

Workshop Schedule


Moderators:

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of California Irvine
Orange,  CA

James M. Foran, MD
Mayo Clinic
Jacksonville,  FL

Moderators:

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of California Irvine
Orange,  CA

Neil Zakai
Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont
Burlington,  VT

Speakers:

Rushad Patell, M.B.B.S.
Harvard Medical School, Harvard University
Boston,  MA
Natural Language Processing and Artificial Intelligence in Venous Thromboembolism; Are We There Yet?

Helen Ma, M.D.
University of California Irvine and Long Beach Veterans Administration Medical Center
Long Beach,  CA
Use of Natural Language Capture in a VA Database for a Study of Military Exposures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

Jordan C. Ray, M.D.
Mayo Clinic
Jacksonville, 
Using an AI-Enabled EKG Algorithm to Predict Atrial Arrhythmia and Outcome after Allogeneic Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

David L. Jaye, MD
Emory University School of Medicine
Dunwoody,  GA
Opportunities for AI/Machine Learning in Hematopathology.

Tarec Christoffer El-Galaly, M.D., D.S.M.C.
Aalborg University Hospital
Aalborg,  Denmark
Individualized Outcome Prediction Based on Observational Data.

Moderators:

James R. Cerhan, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of California Irvine
Orange,  CA

Speakers:

Erlene K Seymour, MD
Flatiron Health
New York,  NY
Leveraging Machine Learning and Case Control Design to Understand CAR-T Utilization Using EHR-Based Real-World Data

Neil Zakai
Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont
Burlington,  VT
Computable Phenotypes to Assess Risk of VTE and Bleeding in Medical Inpatients

Anjali Sharathkumar, MD, MS
University of Iowa
Iowa City,  IA
EHR Data from N3C Enclave.

Kenneth R. Carson, MD, PhD
Tempus Labs
Chicago,  IL
Reflections on a Decade of Real-World Data Experience.

Moderators:

James R. Cerhan, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of California Irvine
Orange,  CA

Speakers:

Lee Greenberger, Ph.D.
Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
Rye Brook,  NY
Lessons Learned in Using Social Media for Recruitment to a Large Leukemia & Lymphoma Society National Registry

Gita Thanarajasingam, MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Wearable Devices to Collect Data on Functional Status in Lymphoma Patients: The In4M Study

Moderators:

Neil Zakai
Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont
Burlington,  VT

James R. Cerhan, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

The workshop will cover the basic science of myeloid development and there will be no presentations on clinical/treatment strategies. The research that will be presented will utilize the tools of molecular biology, biochemistry, and animal models to address these topics.

The workshop is designed to be an interactive discussion of primary data after a brief introduction.Each session is led by a moderator and include four 10-minute talks (6-minute presentations of no more than five slides, followed by 4-minutes of discussion). The primary data is defined as either late-breaking, after ASH abstract submission, or data not presented at ASH. The data presented should be derived from laboratory-based studies.In order to encourage the lively interactive format, workshop speakers are limited to five slides, and are not permitted to present surveys of the field, summaries of previous data, or acknowledgement slides.

The topic-specific sessions will each have 4 speakers. Session moderators are identified by the workshop co-chairs.Workshop speakers are identified by the session moderators and workshop co-chairs from individuals already committed to attending the ASH annual meeting. As in 2020 and 2021, our workshop will focus exclusively on early career PIs, who have had their own independent lab for 5 years or less.

Workshop Schedule


Moderator:

Patricia Ernst, PhD
University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus
Aurora,  CO

Moderator:

Benjamin L. Ebert, MD, PhD
Harvard Medical School
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Liling Wan, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Chromatin Reader in Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

Liling Wan, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Q&A

Zuzana Tothova, MD, PhD
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA
Splicing Modulators Impair DNA Damage Response and Induce Killing of Cohesin-Mutant MDS/AML

Zuzana Tothova, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Cambridge,  MA
Q&A

Florian Perner, MD
University Medicine Greifswald
Greifswald,  Germany
Acquired Resistance to Menin Inhibition in AML

Florian Perner, MD
University Medicine Greifswald
Greifswald,  Germany
Q&A

Sara E. Meyer, PhD
Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center
Philadelphia,  PA
Translational Utility of TLR Signaling in AML

Sara E. Meyer, PhD
Thomas Jefferson University, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center
Philadelphia,  PA
Q&A

Moderator:

Eric M Pietras, PhD
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Aurora,  CO

Speakers:

Cameron McAlpine, Ph.D.
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York City,  NY
Sleep Exerts Lasting Effects on Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function and Diversity

Cameron McAlpine, Ph.D.
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York City,  NY
Q&A

Zhuoer Xie, MD,MS
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa,  FL
What Did We Learn from Ccus Data Registry to Clinical Trial?

Zhuoer Xie, MD,MS
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa,  FL
Q&A

Aaron D Viny, MD,MS
Columbia University
New York,  NY
Epigenetic Determinants of HSC Self-Renewal and Myeloid Fate Commitment

Aaron D Viny, MD,MS
Columbia University
New York,  NY
Q&A

Lev Silberstein, PhD, MD
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Seattle,  WA
Niche-Derived Semaphorin 4A Prevents Functional Loss of Myeloid-Biased HSC during Inflammation and Aging

Lev Silberstein, PhD, MD
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Seattle,  WA
Q&A

Moderator:

Claudia Lengerke, MD
University Hospital Tuebingen
Tuebingen,  Germany

Speakers:

Raquel Espin Palazon, PhD
Iowa State University
Ames,  IA
Deconstructing Inflammatory Dynamics during Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development

Raquel Espin Palazon, PhD
Iowa State University
Ames,  IA
Q&A

Daniel B. Lipka, MD
German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT)
Heidelberg,  Germany
Epigenomic Heterogeneity in Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

Daniel B. Lipka, MD
German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT)
Heidelberg,  Germany
Q&A

Elisa Laurenti, PhD
Wellcome - Medical Research Council Cambridge Stem Cell Institute
Cambridge,  United Kingdom
Adaptation of Human Haematopoietic Stem Cells to ex vivo Cultures

Elisa Laurenti, PhD
Wellcome - Medical Research Council Cambridge Stem Cell Institute
Cambridge,  United Kingdom
Q&A

Nicola Vannini, PhD
University of Lausanne
Epalinges,  Switzerland
Boosting Mitochondrial Recycling in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Rejuvenates Hematopoietic and Immune Systems

Nicola Vannini, PhD
University of Lausanne
Epalinges,  Switzerland
Q&A

Moderator:

Ulrich G. Steidl, MD, PhD
Montefiore Medical Center/ Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Bronx,  NY

Speakers:

Xiaotiang Zhang, PhD
University of Texas Health Science Center
Houston,  TX
Mutant Npm1 Hijacks Active Transcriptional Machinery to Maintain Pathogenic Gene Programs in AML

Xiaotiang Zhang, PhD
University of Texas Health Science Center
Houston,  TX
Q&A

Maxim Pimkin, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Brookline,  MA
Narrow Direct Gene-Regulatory Programs of Oncogenic AML Transcription Factors Reveal a New Model of Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuitry

Maxim Pimkin, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Brookline,  MA
Q&A

Ani J. Deshpande, PhD
SANFORD BURNHAM PREBYS MEDICAL DISCOVERY INSTITUTE
San Diego,  CA
A New Chromatin Reader in AML Stem Cells

Ani J. Deshpande, PhD
SANFORD BURNHAM PREBYS MEDICAL DISCOVERY INSTITUTE
San Diego,  CA
Q&A

Anastasia N Tikhonova, PhD
University of Toronto
Toronto,  ON, Canada
Delineating the Developmental Hierarchy and Immune Microenvironment of T Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

Anastasia N Tikhonova, PhD
University of Toronto
Toronto,  ON, Canada
Q&A

Moderator:

Ross L. Levine, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York,  NY

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

The proposed workshop will discuss recent advances in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) pathogenesis, novel targeted therapies that are being developed based on these advances, and emerging data on long term sequelae of TMAs. While TMAs are a popular topic, only clinical aspects have been covered at the ASH annual meeting even for the most part, even though there have been number of recent developments in pathogenesis and early therapeutics.

The proposed workshop program includes both basic and translational topics. The proposed speakers are from 5 countries, 55% are early career researchers and 45% are women.

Workshop Schedule


Moderator:

Shruti Chaturvedi, MBBS
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore,  MD

Moderator:

Karen Vanhoorelbeke, PhD
KU Leuven Campus Kulak Kortrijk
Kortrijk,  Belgium

Speakers:

Karen Vanhoorelbeke, PhD
KU Leuven Campus Kulak Kortrijk
Kortrijk,  Belgium
Introductory Remarks

Jan Voorberg, PhD
Sanquin Research
Amsterdam,  Netherlands
Loss of Immune Tolerance in Acquired TTP

Karen Vanhoorelbeke, PhD
KU Leuven Campus Kulak Kortrijk
Kortrijk,  Belgium
Conformational Plasticity of ADAMTS13 and Immune TTP

Konstantine Halkidis, MD,PhD
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City,  KS
ADAMTS13 Antibody Profiles in TTP

Moderator:

Spero Cataland, MD
Ohio State University Medical Center
Columbus,  OH

Speakers:

Spero Cataland, MD
Ohio State University Medical Center
Columbus,  OH
Introductory Remarks

Sumithira Vasu, MBBS
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Therapeutic Targets in Transplant-Associated Thrombotic Microangiopathy

Linus A. Voelker
University Hospital Cologne
Cologne,  Germany
Alternative Dosing Regimens for Caplacizumab in TTP

Anuja Java, [email protected]
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE IN ST. LOUIS
St. Louis,  MO
To Stop or Not to Stop – Guiding Treatment Duration for Complement Mediated TMA

Moderator:

Shruti Chaturvedi, MBBS
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore,  MD

Speakers:

Shruti Chaturvedi, MBBS
John Hopkins Medical Institute
BALTIMORE,  MD
Introductory Remarks

Marshall Mazepa, MD
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis,  MN
TTP and the Brain

Camila Masias, MD
Miami Cancer Institute
Miami,  FL
Pregnancy in Women with a History of Thrombotic Microangiopathy

Moderator:

Shruti Chaturvedi, MBBS
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore,  MD

Friday, December 9, 2022,  2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Central time

This is a proposed workshop to continue the successful translational molecular diagnostics Friday scientific workshops of 2020 and 2021. In 2022, we proposed to focus the workshop on the use of translational molecular diagnostics in the reclassification of blood cancer along genomic lines. There are currently large scale efforts underway to move toward more biologically/genomically driven classification of blood cancer in order to more appropriately categorise patients and inform treatment options. These efforts are being undertaken by individual researchers, collaborative groups and world-wide bodies (WHO).

This workshop will aim to cover (i) methodologies used to discover new genomic subgroups of blood cancer (ii) descriptions of novel genomically defined entities and (iii) therapeutic implications of novel genomic subtypes.

This is an area of significant and broad interest across disease groups in blood cancer which we anticipate will have broad appeal. It is not an area that is covered by other ASH sessions to our knowledge.

Workshop Schedule


Moderator:

Piers Blombery, MBBS
Peter Maccallum Cancer Centre
East Melbourne,  VIC, Australia

Moderator:

Torsten Haferlach, MD
MLL Munich Leukemia Laboratory
Munich,  Germany

Speakers:

Rashmi Kanagal-Shamanna, MD
The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Harnessing Emerging Technologies for Accurate Genomic Classification, Prognostication and Therapeutic Discovery in Myeloid Neoplasms

Ing Soo Tiong
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne,  VIC, Australia
Classification and Subclassification of Blood Cancer Using Circulating Tumour DNA

Ilaria Iacobucci, PhD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Contemporary Guidelines for Diagnosis and Genomic Classification of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Lu Wang
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Memphis,  TN
Integrating Whole-Genome and Whole-Transcriptome Sequencing for Molecular Diagnosis, Classification and Risk Stratification of Pediatric and Adolescent AML

Moderator:

Sanam Loghavi, MD
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX

Speakers:

Sanam Loghavi, MD
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Introductory Remarks

Björn Chapuy
Charite, University Medical Center Berlin
Berlin,  Germany
Genetically-Defined DLBCL Subtypes - Ready for Prime Time?

Joshua W.D. Tobin, MD PhD
Gold Coast University Hospital
Gold Coast,  QLD, Australia
Taxonomy of DLBCL and FL Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

Javeed Iqbal, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha,  NE
Molecular Classification of Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

Gordana Raca, MD, PhD
Children's Hospital Los Angeles
Los Angeles,  CA
Feasibility and Clinical Utility of an Rnaseq-Workflow for Subtype Classification and Genomic Characterization of Pediatric B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

Moderator:

John F. Seymour, MBBS, PhD, FRACP
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne,  VIC, Australia

Speakers:

John F. Seymour, MBBS, PhD, FRACP
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne,  VIC, Australia
Introductory Remarks

Daniel A. Arber, MD
University of Chicago,
Chicago, 
Philosophy and Overview of the International Consensus Classification of Myeloid and Lymphoid Neoplasms

Megan Lim
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, 
Philosophy and Overview of the Who Update to the Classification of Hematological Neoplasms

Francis Baumgartner
MLL
Munich,  AL, DEU
Comparing Malignant Monocytoses across Classification Systems

Moderator:

Elli Papaemmanuil, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
NEW YORK,  NY

Speakers:

Elli Papaemmanuil, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
NEW YORK,  NY
Introductory Remarks

Jeffery Klco, MD, PhD
Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Ubtf Tandem Duplications As a Novel Sutype of Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Phillip Nguyen
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne,  Australia
Ubtf Tandem Duplications in Myeloid Malignancy in Adults - Expansion of Phenotype?

Pauline Robbe, PhD
University of Oxford
Oxford,  United Kingdom
Subclassifying CLL Using Whole Genome Sequencing

Daniel Noerenberg, MD
Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin Institute of Health
Berlin,  Germany
PMBCL - a Distinct Genomic Entity

Moderator:

Torsten Haferlach, MD
MLL Munich Leukemia Laboratory
Munich,  Germany