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ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition

Education Program

All Education Program presentations will be held Saturday, December 9, Sunday, December 10, and Monday, December 11. Each session will be offered once and will be 75-minutes long. The sessions will take place in person and stream simultaneously on the virtual platform (the recording will be available on demand). Sessions will consist of didactic presentations followed by panel discussions and a question-and-answer period with all of the speakers. Session descriptions for this program will be available in the annual meeting app and in the online meeting planner.

Program Co-Chairs

Jean Connors, MD
Amy DeZern, MD

Sessions on Malignant Hematology

Are We Personalizing MDS Therapy in 2023?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6

Myelodysplastic Neoplasms (MDS) represent a heterogeneous cohort of myeloid malignancies hallmarked by dysplasia of the bone marrow, peripheral blood cytopenias and propensity for transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). There have been transformative changes in the diagnostic and molecular classification of patients with MDS as well as more personalized prognostic discrimination based on the underlying molecular landscape. Importantly, there has been significant insight into the underlying pathobiology of these patients which has identified additional therapeutic targets. There have been new approvals and positive phase 3 studies for patients with lower risk MDS but we have continued to not have a change in the standard of care for higher risk MDS patients. Dr. Rena Xian will discuss updates in classification including recent WHO and ICC classifications as well as how molecular annotation of patients can refine prognosis with the molecular IPSS (IPSS-M). Dr. Marie Sebert will discuss the current treatment algorithm of patients with lower risk MDS as well as will highlight novel therapies under investigation to both ameliorate cytopenias and/or provide disease modification in patients with lower risk MDS. Dr. David Sallman will discuss the historical lessons we have learned from past failed randomized studies in higher risk MDS and cover the current ongoing randomized efforts to improve upon the standard of care of azacitidine for higher risk MDS patients.

Chair:

David A Sallman, MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa, FL

Speakers:

Rena R. Xian, MD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD
How to Classify Risk Based On Clinical and Molecular Modeling: Integrating molecular markers in the risk assessment of myelodysplastic syndrome

Marie Sebert, MD, PhD
Hôpital Saint-Louis
Paris, France
Next-Generation Therapy for Lower Risk MDS

David A Sallman, MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa, FL
Frontline Treatment Options for Higher Risk MDS: Can We Move Past Azacitidine?

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CAR T Cells in ALL: Bridge or Definitive Therapy?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6B
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6B
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6B
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6B

Most pediatric patients with ALL achieve durable long-term remission with chemotherapy alone, however, some experience refractory or multiply relapsed diseases requiring further definitive therapy. HSCT has a long-established track record in ALL with favorable overall survival rates. More recently, CAR T-cells have been a transformational addition to the tools available for the treatment of ALL. While there are generally accepted criteria for selecting patients for definitive therapy, currently, physician judgement and institutional preference primarily drive the decision on HSCT vs CAR T. This educational session will explore the criteria to be considered for using HSCT vs CAR T in high-risk ALL including patient’s individual risk, prior complications/toxicities/organ functions, graft sources available, institutional expertise, and access to cellular therapy.

Dr. Nirali Shah will discuss delayed toxicities following CAR T-cells, outline the management of delayed toxicity in the post-CAR T-cell setting, weigh current approaches to vaccination and monitoring of immune reconstitution post CAR T-cells and shed light on active efforts in the study of late effects, including monitoring of second malignant neoplasms.

Dr. Alice Bertaina will discuss HSCT considerations for ALL. The recent emergence of CD19+ CAR T therapy as another viable treatment option for R/R ALL offers unique considerations for the selection of definitive therapy in these patients. This talk will outline the current state of the art of HSCT for ALL and will discuss relevant considerations for selecting a definitive therapy in ALL.

Dr. Stephen Gottschalk will review the role of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HSCT) to sustain remission post CD19-CAR T cell therapies and discuss 2nd genetic modifications to improve CAR T cell persistence and prevent the emergence of antigen loss variants.

Chair:

Alice Bertaina, MD, PhD
Stanford University
Palo Alto, CA

Speakers:

Nirali N. Shah, M.D.
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD
Long-Term Follow-Up of CD19-CAR T-Cell Therapy in Children and Young Adults With B-ALL

Alice Bertaina, MD, PhD
Stanford University
Palo Alto, CA
Stem Cell Transplantation for ALL: You’ve Always Got a Donor, Why Not Always Use It?

Stephen Gottschalk, MD
St. Jude's
Memphis, TN
Preventing Relapse after CD19-CAR T-cell Therapy for Pediatric ALL: Role of Transplant and Enhanced CAR T cells

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Graft Versus Host Disease: Is an Ounce of Prevention Worth a Pound of Cure?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB

Prevention remains the cornerstone of graft versus host disease (GVHD) management. The landscape of GVHD prevention is undergoing significant changes, with modifications to the standard calcineurin inhibitor and methotrexate regimens, along with incorporation of novel agents, and development of innovative graft manipulation techniques. These advancements have expanded donor pool, including the use of haploidentical and mismatched unrelated donors. However, despite these improvements, GVHD continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality after transplantation. Biomarker algorithms show promise in developing preemptive approaches to reduce GVHD and improve GVHD treatment outcomes. 

In this review Dr. Schultz will summarize the state-of-the-art risk assignments and algorithms for acute and chronic GVHD and discuss current approaches and limitations for preemptive therapy.

Dr. Qayed will review recent clinical trials and approaches to acute GVHD prophylaxis, including in unrelated and haploidentical donor transplantation, and discuss changes in clinical practice as well as emerging strategies and ongoing clinical trials.

Dr. Amanam will review clinical trial results regarding chronic GVHD outcomes, promising targeted agents for chronic GVHD treatment, and the use of novel endpoints to assess the effectiveness  of GVHD-directed therapies.

Chair:

Muna Qayed, MD
Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, GA

Speakers:

Kirk R. Schultz
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada
Planning GVHD Preemptive Therapy: Risk factors, Biomarkers, and Prognostic Scores

Muna Qayed, MD
Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, GA
Novel Approaches to Acute GVHD Prevention

Idoroenyi Amanam, MD
Department of Hematologic Malignancies Translational Science, Gehr Family Center for Leukemia Research, City of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute
Duarte, CA
Chronic GVHD: Review Advances in Prevention, Novel Endpoints and Targeted Strategies

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Have We Optimized Therapy Yet for Patients with AML?


Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF

In this Education Session, we will review the transformation in AML therapy from traditional 7+3 for fit patients and hypomethylating agents for unfit patients to new standards of care and ongoing questions in the field.  We will discuss the data regarding the development of hypomethylating agents plus venetoclax as the new standard of care for older patients and those not eligible for induction chemotherapy.  There is growing interest in the use of HMA/Ven combinations for younger and fit patients and in specific subsets of AML - limited data in these patient populations and ongoing clinical trials will be reviewed.   Resistance to HMA/Ven therapy remains a significant concern and recent data regarding mechanisms of resistance and potential strategies to overcome ven resistance will be addressed.  Given the FDA approval of several targeted agents in AML since 2017, there is a need to understand and optimize the use of these medications in combinations with traditional AML therapy.  Questions regarding combinations, sequencing and management of toxicities will be discussed.  Optimization of 7+3 chemotherapy in specific subsets of AML will be reviewed, including 7+3 based combinations with FLT3 inhibitors or gemtuzumab, as well as the use of CPX-351 in older patients with secondary AML and recent data in other AML patient populations. 

Chair:

Tara L Lin, MD
The University of Kansas Medical Center
Westwood, KS

Speakers:

Christoph Röllig, MD, MSc
University Hospital Dresden
Dresden, Germany
Improving Long-Term Outcomes With Intensive Induction Chemotherapy for Patients with AML

Tara L Lin, MD
University of Kansas Medical Center
Fairway, KS
The Approach of HMA + ven With or Without BMT for All patients

Justin M. Watts, MD
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
MIAMI, FL
The Future Paradigm of HMA + ven or Targeted Inhibitor Approaches: Sequencing or Triplet Combinations in AML Therapy

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How Can We Manage High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies in the Community?


Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B

The complexity of treating hematologic malignancies continues to grow rapidly with novel agents, BiTe therapy, CAR-T, and transplantation, which offer potentially a new horizon for patients struggling with these diseases. As these therapies are becoming the stand of care, the question of access remains a large factor in improving patient outcomes in the community where most of the cancer care is delivered. This educational session will explore the diagnostic, supportive, and treatment challenges that often present in the local setting with acute leukemia, high grade lymphomas, and multiple myeloma. We offer a case-based discussion for optimal management, as well as explore the role of clinical trials locally in terms of increasing access, diversity, options, and outcomes in the community.

Chair:

Dipti Patel-Donnelly, MD
Virginia Cancer Specialists
Fairfax, VA

Speakers:

Dipti Patel-Donnelly, MD
Virginia Cancer Specialists
Fairfax, VA
Acute Leukemias and Complicated Lymphomas: Pearls to Optimize Management When Patients Stay Local

Jesus G. Berdeja, MD
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Nashville, TN
Multiple Myeloma: A Paradigm for Blending Community and Academic Care

Ruemu E. Birhiray, MD
Hem.-Onc. of Indiana, PC
Indianapolis, IN
Clinical Research in the Community

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How Do We Apply T-Cell Redirection Therapy for Multiple Myeloma? CAR T-Cells and Bispecific Antibodies


Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom ABCD
Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom ABCD
Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom ABCD
Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom ABCD

How Do We Apply T-Cell Redirection Therapy for Multiple Myeloma? CAR T-Cells and Bispecific Antibodies The introduction of immune based therapeutics such as bispecific antibodies and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T) has revolutionized the treatment of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. Such therapies targeting plasma cell antigens such as the B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), G-protein coupled receptor family C group 5 member D (GPRC5D) and Fc Receptor Like 5 (FCRL5) lead to deep and durable responses in triple class and penta-refractory myeloma patients. These therapies also introduced a new set of challenges related to their unique toxicities and their management as well as the understanding of the optimal way to administer and sequence them. Dr. Nizar J.Bahlis will discuss the current use of bispecific antibodies to treat multiple myeloma. In addition the mechanisms that mediate the acquired resistance or escape to bispecific antibodies will be outlined while providing a guidance to the optimal administration and sequencing of these drugs. Dr. Sham Mailankody will review the currently approved CAR T cells in multiple myeloma as well as other CAR T cell platforms currently under clinical investigations. He will also discuss the optimal usage and sequencing of CAR T cells in the context of other multiple myeloma therapies. Dr. Surbhi Sidana, will review the toxicities associated with bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, including cytokine release syndrome (CRS), immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome (ICANS), delayed neurotoxicity, cytopenias, and infection. She will also provide guidance on how to manage these toxicities.

Chair:

Nizar J Bahlis, MD
University of Calgary
Calgary, AB, Canada

Speakers:

Nizar J Bahlis, MD
University of Calgary
Calgary, AB, Canada
Current Use of Bispecific Antibodies to Treat Multiple Myeloma

Sham Mailankody, MBBS
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Current Use of CAR T-Cells to Treat Multiple Myeloma

Surbhi Sidana, MD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA
Managing Side Effects: Guidance for Use of Immunotherapies in Multiple Myeloma

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How Do We Calibrate Cellular Therapy for Lymphoma in 2023?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6CF

CD19 directed CAR-T cell therapy represents a breakthrough in cancer treatment achieving unprecedented success in relapsed/refractory B cell lymphomas. However, the economic burden related to manufacturing and logistics, adverse events such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS), neurotoxicity, infections and cytopenias underscores the importance of assessing prognostic and predictive tools for therapy success. Outcome of patients who progress after CAR-T cell therapy is poor in the current era and management remains unclear. BITE’s are recently approved off-the-shelf T cell engagers that have shown excellent efficacy and tolerability leading to regulatory approval in relapsed lymphomas. Thus, the ideal sequencing of T cell therapies in relapsed aggressive lymphomas necessitates a roadmap to further guide the contemporaneous management of lymphomas.

Chair:

Manali K. Kamdar, MD, MBBS
University of Colorado,
Denver, CO

Speakers:

Anna Maria Sureda Balari, MD, PhD
Institut Català d'Oncologia-L'Hospitalet, IDIBALL, Universitat de Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain
CAR T-Cell Therapy in Aggressive Lymphomas-Identifying Prognostic and Predictive Markers

Loretta J. Nastoupil, MD
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX
Management of Aggressive Lymphoma After CAR T-Cell Therapy Failure

Manali K. Kamdar, MD, MBBS
University of Colorado,
Denver, CO
Selection of Bispecific Antibody Therapies or CAR T-Cell Therapy in Relapsed Lymphomas

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How Do We Enhance Results in Rare Hematologic Malignancies?


Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29

Rare hematologic malignancies are neoplastic diseases that hematologists encounter only occasionally. These diseases are often diagnosed late after symptoms persist or standard treatments fail, require multidisciplinary care, individualized treatment plans, strong supportive care, as well as access to experimental therapies. This educational session will review and discuss three rare hematologic malignancies: Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH), Systemic Mastocytosis (SM), and Amyloidosis. Dr. Abla will cover LCH, a rare inflammatory myeloid neoplasm with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations in children and adults. High-risk patients include those with liver, spleen, bone marrow involvement, refractory/relapsed disease, and those with CNS neurodegeneration. Patients without high-risk disease have excellent survival but are prone to late sequelae. This talk will focus on recent molecular discoveries, management of high-risk patients, MAPK targeted therapies, new and emerging treatment approaches, and unanswered questions in LCH. Dr. Radia will review SM. Over 95% of patients harbor the driver KIT D816V mutation resulting in mast cell accumulation and proliferation leading to variable symptoms due to mast cell mediator release and end-organ damage with advanced disease. Accurate diagnostic and clinical classification is vital to appropriately treat and personalize therapy. Dr. Radia will evaluate diagnostic criteria, clinical classification, risk stratification, and therapeutic options available for patients with non-advanced and advanced SM including multikinase KIT inhibitors. Amyloidosis encompasses diseases characterized by abnormal protein accumulation in organs, leading to heterogeneous and diverse clinical manifestations. Delayed diagnosis is common in amyloidosis, with patients experiencing symptoms for several months to years and consulting multiple specialists before amyloidosis is considered and confirmed. Dr. D’Souza’s session will identify concerning symptoms and signs that should trigger a suspicion of amyloidosis, describe a systems approach to the diagnosis, and outline key steps after a diagnosis of amyloidosis is made.

Chair:

Anita D'Souza, MD,MS
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI

Speakers:

Oussama Abla, MD
University of Toronto, Hospital for Sick Children- Division of Hematology/Oncology
Toronto, ON, Canada
Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Promises and Caveats of Targeted Therapies in High-risk and CNS Disease

Deepti H Radia, MD,FRCPath
Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital
London, United Kingdom
Mastocytosis Demystified

Anita D'Souza, MD,MS
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI
Amyloid Consults Do Not Have to be Vexing

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How Do We Extend Survival for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) in 2023?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD

CLL is the most common form of leukemia in the western world. As the majority of patients are elderly at diagnosis and often have other medical comorbidities, this creates a challenging situation for treating oncologists. Important considerations include effective and tolerable regimens, that utilize novel mechanisms of action and can be tailored to the patient, particularly those with high-risk features. This educational session will focus on dual targeted therapeutic options for treatment naïve patients and novel agents under investigation in Richter Transformation. In addition, this session with discuss the role of minimal residual disease in the management of CLL. Dr. Chaitra S. Ujjani will discuss clinical trials leading to the approval of dual targeted regimens for the front-line treatment of CLL. She will also discuss clinical trials involving the combination of BTK and BCL2 inhibitors in previously untreated patients. Dr. Joanna M. Rhodes will discuss the role of minimal residual disease (MRD) testing in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A focus will be placed on data from clinical trials of targeted therapies and the role of MRD in response assessments, and its clinical utility in practice. Dr Toby A Eyre will discuss the current management and challenges of managing patients with Richter Transformation of CLL. Recent advances, clinical trial data and future developments will be discussed.

Chair:

Chaitra S Ujjani, MD
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center
Seattle, WA

Speakers:

Chaitra S Ujjani, MD
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center
Seattle, WA
Dual Targeted Regimens for the Front-line Treatment of CLL

Joanna M. Rhodes, MD
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ
MRD Directed Therapy in CLL- Ready for Primetime?

Toby A. Eyre
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Headington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Richters Transformation- Is There Light at the End of this Tunnel?

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How Do We Improve Outcomes in Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma in 2023?


Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom EFGH
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom EFGH
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom EFGH
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Seaport Ballroom EFGH

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clinically and biologically highly heterogeneous disease, as the overall survival can vary from more than a decade in patients with standard risk disease treated with intensive chemotherapy to 2-3 years in patients with high-risk features. Current standard of care includes the use of antiCD38 monoclonal antibodies upfront, both in patients eligible for transplant and in transplant non eligible patients, in combination with immunomodulatory agents and/or proteasome inhibitors. Recently, anti BCMA therapies have also been introduced with impressive efficacy results in late lines of treatment, and studies are evaluating their role in earlier phases. This educational session will explore the evidence for best practices for patients with relapsed/refractory MM including a focus on treatment of functional high risk patients, relapse after anti CD38 therapies and relapse after anti-BCMA treatment. Dr. Francesca Gay will discuss the treatment approach for “functional high-risk patients”, typically defined as patients who do not necessarily display baseline high-risk features but show a suboptimal response to induction therapy or relapse early after treatment initiation. She will first review the current available known risk factors to promptly identify these patients, and then focus on the possible management. Dr. Monique Hartley-Brown will focus on the management of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma post anti-CD38 therapy exposure. She will discuss data for using BCMA targeted therapy options and non-BCMA targeted therapies in 1st and 2nd relapse disease, including cellular therapies in these earlier relapse disease setting. Dr. Adam Cohen will discuss potential options for the patient progressing after a BCMA-targeted therapy, including switching to a different BCMA-targeted therapy, trying a non-BCMA-targeted, T cell- directed therapy, re-exploring a standard myeloma triplet/quadruplet regimen, or trying a novel non-T cell-directed therapy. Finally, he will review patient- and disease-related factors that may help guide decision-making.

Chair:

Francesca Gay, MD,PhD
Division of Hematology 1, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Torino and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Torino
Torino, Italy

Speakers:

Francesca Gay, MD,PhD
Division of Hematology 1, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, University of Torino and Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Torino
Torino, Italy
A Rational Approach to Functional High-Risk Myeloma

Monique A Hartley-Brown, MD
DFCI
Boston, MA
Considerations for Next Therapy After ANTI CD38 Monoclonal Antibodies Used as First Line

Adam D. Cohen, MD
The Trustees of The University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Options at the Time of Relapse After ANTI BCMA Therapy

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How Do We Tackle Remaining Clinical Challenges in CML?


Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, San Diego Ballroom AB

While the vast majority of chronic phase CML patients achieve optimal responses with BCR::ABL1-directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), there remains a select group of patients who either experience resistance and/or disease progression despite TKI therapy. Strategies for improving outcomes in this challenging cohort need to be formulated and advances in technology, understanding of disease biology and therapeutics can further ongoing innovation in this area. This educational session will explore the recent developments in blast phase CML, including a focus on updates in therapeutics directed against this phase of disease. Addressing the mechanisms underpinning resistance, including kinase domain mutations, will also be reviewed. Lastly, we will discuss atypical CML, an orphan disease, which although shares a similar name has a completely different disease biology, treatment and management approach.

Dr Naranie Shanmuganathan will outline the key updates in disease definitions within recent guidelines affecting how clinicians classify the phases of CML, attempting to identify which patients have the highest transformation potential. Identification of a CML-like acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) phenotype may assist in differentiating Ph+ ALL from de novo lymphoid blast crisis CML which remains a challenge. Furthermore, technological advances with next generation sequencing have also aided in unmasking the complexity of the genomic landscape associated with disease progression which may offer future therapeutic targets. Lastly, novel strategies to treat blast phase CML will be explored and can offer an alternative approach to conventional treatment.

Associate Professor Simona Soverini will follow on with a discussion regarding the impact of kinase domain mutations in CML which still continues to be the best understood mechanism of resistance in CML. An unsatisfactory response to TKI therapy may indicate the presence of mutations in the BCR::ABL1 kinase domain. Associate Professor Soverini will explore the optimal timing for BCR::ABL1 kinase domain mutation testing with a detailed review of the available and developing technologies. She will also illustrate how the presence of a TKI-resistant mutation should trigger a change of therapy, and detection of specific mutations can help direct sequential TKI therapy to maximise response and minimize expansion of a resistant clone.

Finally, Associate Professor Massimo Breccia will explore updates to the diagnostic criteria based on the recent iteration of the WHO and the ICC. Next generation sequencing has also started to expose the genomic landscape associated with atypical CML, with a particular focus on SETBP1 and ETNK1 variants. While a consensus on prognostic stratification is yet to be agreed upon, the various factors that have been associated with prognostication will be discussed, including the Mayo clinic model. A summary of possible treatments will also be reviewed including the appropriateness of an allogeneic stem cell transplant even after the identification of actionable targets.

Chair:

Naranie Shanmuganathan, MBBS,FRACP,FRCPA, PhD
Royal Adelaide Hospital
Adelaide, SA, Australia

Speakers:

Naranie Shanmuganathan, MBBS,FRACP,FRCPA, PhD
Royal Adelaide Hospital
Adelaide, SA, Australia
Beyond chronic phase CML: de novo and transformed

Simona Soverini, PhD
Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche e Chirurgiche (DIMEC), Università di Bologna
Bologna, Italy
Resistance Mutations in CML and How We Approach Them

Massimo Breccia
Hematology-Sapienza University
Rome, Italy
Atypical CML-Diagnosis and Treatment

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How is the Management Paradigm Evolving for Hodgkin Lymphoma in 2023?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20CD

The addition of novel therapeutic agents has changed the standard of care for advanced-stage and relapsed/refractory classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Limited-stage disease has traditionally been treated with combination chemotherapy with or without consolidative radiation. Novel therapeutics are actively being integrated into frontline therapy for limited-stage disease to improve acute survival rates and optimize longer-term outcomes. Historically, survival rates have been modest for older cHL patients. However, a renewed effort globally has resulted in the generation of a multitude of new real-world and clinical trial data. In addition, there remains an unmet need to identify therapeutic options for cHL patients who have progressed after brentuximab vedotin and PD-1 blockade.

Dr. Sairah Ahmed will discuss the treatment of limited-stage cHL with standard frontline chemotherapy or combined modality therapy. As CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin and PD-1 blockade have transformed the treatment of relapsed/refractory cHL, recent studies incorporating these agents in limited-stage disease will be explored.

Dr. Andy Evens will examine current real-world and clinical trial data for older cHL patients, emphasizing prognostication, geriatric assessments, treatment intensity, anthracycline use, integration of targeted therapeutic agents, and post-acute survivorship. Patient management and evidence-based data for therapeutic decision-making will be evaluated.

Dr. Natalie Grover will discuss the treatment of relapsed/refractory cHL in patients whose disease has progressed after brentuximab vedotin and PD-1 blockade. Using a case-based approach, therapeutic options for these challenging cases will be presented, including the role of cytotoxic chemotherapy, allogeneic stem cell transplantation, and clinical trial results with novel agents, including chimeric antigen receptor T-cells.

Chair:

Andrew M Evens, DO,MBA,MMSc
Rutgers Cancer Institute New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ

Speakers:

Andrew M Evens, DO,MBA,MMSc
Rutgers Cancer Institute New Jersey
New Brunswick, NJ
Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment for Older Persons in the Modern Era

Sairah Ahmed, MD
The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX
Management of Limited Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

Natalie S. Grover, MD
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC
The Optimal Management of Relapsed and Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: Post-Brentuximab and Checkpoint Inhibitor Failure

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Not Kids Anymore and Not Adults Yet: How Do We Treat Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Patients With ALL?


Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B
Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B
Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B
Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, Grand Hall B

Adolescents and young adult patients (AYA) represent a unique population of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). AYA patients do not fit squarely into either pediatric or adult cohorts. Unfortunately, AYA patients have been shown to have differential outcomes than older and younger patients with ALL. This educational session will explore describe approaches to therapy, differences between AYA and pediatric patients with ALL, and options for improving outcomes for this patient population. Dr. John Molina will review the current outcomes from AYA patients with B-ALL treated with commonly used pediatric or “pediatric-inspired” regimens in the upfront setting. He will discuss the ongoing clinical trials incorporating immunotherapies into the existing chemotherapy backbones and any available preliminary results, as well as the shift to next generation sequencing (NGS) for measurable residual disease (MRD) assessment. Finally, with the introduction of novel therapies into the upfront setting and improved disease response evaluation, he will review the changing role of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) as consolidative therapy for AYA patients achieving a first, complete remission. Dr. Tamara P. Miller will then review the differences between AYA patients and pediatric patients in terms of survival, risks, and barriers to enrollment. She will describe contrasts in genetic risk factors and development of toxicities. She will discuss the range of treatment, trial enrollment and psychosocial challenges that are differ between AYA and pediatric patients. Finally, Dr. Emily Curran will review novel strategies to improve outcomes for AYAs. She will discuss ongoing work to overcome the adverse disease biology that is more common among AYAs with ALL. She will describe ways to leverage technology to improve adherence and try to address psychosocial challenges. Finally, she will review differences in healthcare delivery for AYAs with ALL and need for increased enrollment in clinical trials.

Chair:

Tamara P. Miller, MD
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, GA

Speakers:

John C Molina, MD,MEd
Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation
Cleveland, OH
Leveraging Health Care Technology to Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Outcome Disparities in AYA Leukemia

Tamara P. Miller, MD
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, GA
Adolescent and Young Adults (AYA) Versus Pediatric Patients: Survival, Risks and Barriers to Enrollment

Emily K Curran, MD
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH
Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Young Adults: Which Treatment?

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What Are the Advances in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Affecting Management?


Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6

Over the last several years there have been many advances made in the area of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN).  In this session, we will review the management of MPNs across the spectrum.  In polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET), management of cytoreductive therapies, and appropriate choice of patient and agent will be reviewed.  In myelofibrosis, there has been an explosion of new treatments.  These new agents attempt to address some of the unmet needs in MF therapy, including thrombocytopenia, anemia, and disease modification.  Newer JAK inhibitors are designed to allow for maximal JAK inhibition even in patients with thrombocytopenia and anemia.  Newer agents are targeting non-canonical pathways that may impact disease biology.  Finally, there have been advances in the understanding of allogeneic stem cells for myelofibrosis, which will be reviewed, including challenges pre-, peri- and post-transplant management.

Chair:

Jeanne Palmer, MD
Mayo Clinic - Arizona
Phoenix, AZ

Speakers:

Douglas Tremblay, MD
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York, NY
Cytoreduction for ET and PV: Who, What, When, and How?

Harinder Gill, MD,MBBS,FRCP,FRCPath
The University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Evolving landscape of JAK Inhibition in Myelofibrosis: Monotherapy and Combinations

Jeanne Palmer, MD
Mayo Clinic - Arizona
Phoenix, AZ
Are Transplant Indications Changing for Myelofibrosis?

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What are Treatment Options for Patients with Relapsed, Refractory or Persistent AML?


Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Pacific Ballroom Salons 15-17
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Pacific Ballroom Salons 15-17
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Pacific Ballroom Salons 15-17
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Pacific Ballroom Salons 15-17

While the number of novel and effective therapies available for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has increased significantly over the past 5 years, management of relapsed and refractory AML, particularly following induction with a venetoclax based regimen, remains a challenge. Moreover, the ability to measure the level of disease at the morphologic, cytogenetic, and molecular level has increased the complexity of disease assessments. Specifically, questions remain as to what should be measured when, how it should be measured, and whether this information should be used in risk stratification or when making treatment decisions.  This session will explore the different technologies that are utilized for detection of measurable disease and make recommendations for how to incorporate these results into your clinical practice.  This session will also address the challenge of treatment recommendations for patients who fail hypomethylating agents + venetoclax and discuss novel therapies in development, including those that are immunotherapy based.

Chair:

Alison R. Walker, MD, MPH, MBA
H.Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Tampa, FL

Speakers:

Jacqueline Cloos, MD
Amsterdam UMC, Location VUMC
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Understanding Differential Technologies for Detection of MRD and How to Incorporate into Clinical Practice

Marion Subklewe, MD
Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich
Munich, Germany
Novel Immunotherapies in the Treatment of AML, Is There a Hope?

Alison R. Walker, MD, MPH, MBA
H.Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute
Tampa, FL
Novel Therapies upon Failure of HMA + Venetoclax

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What Makes a Good Transplant Recipient? Putting the Puzzle Pieces Together


Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20AB
Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20AB
Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20AB
Monday, December 11, 2023
2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Ballroom 20AB

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a curative intervention for both malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders. Despite its potential, HCT is accompanied by considerable challenges in patient care, particularly related to treatment-associated morbidity and mortality. In considering the transplant candidate, transplant teams rely on a comprehensive assessment of HCT candidates across three key dimensions encompassing patient, disease, and transplantation-related factors. This detailed evaluation allows clinicians to balance the benefits and risks of HCT and to personalize the parameters of HCT to the individual patient. This educational session centers on the tools and evidence for evaluating the physiological resilience of HCT candidates. We will delve into the available evidence and literature surrounding the assessment of geriatric, frailty, and comorbidity factors that have vital roles in the overall evaluation process. Moreover, the session will emphasize the practical implementation of these evaluations in clinical decision-making processes and how they can guide both patient discussions and decision-making for transplantation recipients. Overall, our aim is to equip clinicians with a comprehensive understanding of candidate evaluation while indicating areas needing further research. We hope to enhance patient outcomes in HCT and foster advancements in the field.

Chair:

Roni Shouval, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Speakers:

Reena Jayani, MD
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, TN
How Old Is Too Old? Frailty and Geriatric Assessments of Older Patients Undergoing Allogeneic HCT

Roni Shouval, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
The Sum of the Parts: What We Can and Cannot Learn from Comorbidity Scores in Allogeneic Transplantation

Asmita Mishra, MD, MBA
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa, FL
Approaches to Optimize Outcomes in Transplant Recipients

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Sessions on Non-Malignant Hematology

Acquired Hemophilia A Diagnosis and Management


Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Saturday, December 9, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D

This session will provide an update on the management of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). The first part will review laboratory diagnosis and monitoring of the disease until stable remission. The second part will discuss immunosuppressive regimens, including newer regimens with reduced toxicity. The last part will explore the role of emicizumab in the management of AHA in light of upcoming clinical trial results.

Chair:

Andreas Tiede, MD
Hannover Medical School
Hannover, Germany

Speakers:

Sean Platton, MSc CSci FIBMS
Barts Health NHS Trust
London, ENG, United Kingdom
Diagnosis and Laboratory Monitoring of Acquired Haemophilia A

Andreas Tiede, MD
Hannover Medical School
Hannover, Germany
Immunotherapy of Acquired Hemophilia A

Rebecca Kruse-Jarres, MD,MPH
University of Washington
Seattle, WA
The Role of Emicizumab in Acquired Hemophilia A

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Alphabet Soup - Challenging Consults on the Pediatric Units


Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11

Identifying a rare or complex disorder that may have various non-specific clinical and/or laboratory findings can be difficult in a pediatric patient. Early recognition and the ability to make a diagnosis can often be critical for the management of many of these types of conditions. This session will review some of the more challenging “alphabet soup” diagnoses that the pediatric hematologist/oncologist faces when doing consults on a pediatric inpatient unit. Talks will focus on when to consider certain complex illnesses and distinguishing between related disorders that may have similar presentations and will provide up to date reviews of appropriate work-up and management of these disorders.

Dr. Kumar will address the challenges in making the diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). He will highlight the pitfalls in currently available diagnostic approaches and discuss newer, more reliable methods to diagnose primary HLH, and to differentiate HLH from its various mimics such as infections and malignancies.

Dr. Nicole Kucine will discuss leukocytosis in young children with a focus on myeloproliferative disorders unique to infancy and early childhood. She will review the presentation and differential diagnosis of young children with myeloid proliferation, focusing on transient abnormal myelopoiesis in infants with Trisomy 21 and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia in infants and young children, as well as associated disorders, and will outline the process for their evaluation.

Dr. Takemoto will focus on consumptive thrombocytopenia due to immune and non-immune causes.  The diagnosis and management of heparin induced thrombocytopenia in children will be reviewed.  In addition, clinical and laboratory features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemias will be discussed, as well as approaches to the diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura, and other thrombotic microangiopathies.

Chair:

Nicole Kucine, MD,MS
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, NY

Speakers:

Ashish Kumar, MD
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati, OH
Inflamed – HLH, MAS, or Something Else?

Nicole Kucine, MD,MS
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, NY
Too Many White Cells – TAM, JMML, or Something Else?

Clifford M Takemoto, MD
St Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis, TN
Where Have All the Platelets Gone – HIT, DIC, or Something Else?

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Energizing the Red Cell: Pyruvate Kinase Activators for Treatment of Hereditary Hemolytic Anemias


Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Monday, December 11, 2023
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D

The purpose of this session is to provide an overview of the available data to support the approach of pyruvate kinase (PK) activation for the treatment of hereditary hemolytic anemias. Red cells rely on glycolysis for ATP production which is critical for maintenance of the red cell shape and survival. A deficiency in ATP leads to hemolytic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis which is exemplified by the red cell glycolytic enzyme disorders. PK activation has been shown to improve hemolytic anemia, hematopoiesis, and transfusion requirements in adults with PK deficiency. Other hemolytic anemias, such as the thalassemias and sickle cell disease, result in a state of ATP depletion; limitations in ATP may contribute to poor red cell fitness and survival leading to the associated complications of these disorders. Increasing hemoglobin-oxygen affinity with PK activation through a reduction in 2,3-bisphophoglycerate may decrease red cell sickling, in addition to improving red cell survival, in sickle cell disease. By increasing red cell energy, PK activators may be efficacious across a broad range of hemolytic anemias. This educational session will explore the evidence for consideration of PK activators as a treatment for PK deficiency, sickle cell disease, and the thalassemias, among other red cell disorders.

Dr. Rachael Grace will review the phase 2 and 3 trial data of PK activators for the treatment of adults with pyruvate kinase deficiency. Given that an accurate diagnosis is critical to allow the opportunity for disease-directed treatments, she will discuss the clinical presentation and diagnostic evaluation in children and adults with PK deficiency. This talk will outline real world decision-making for treatment of PK deficiency with PK activators and other treatment options including supportive approaches of transfusions and splenectomy as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplant and clinical trials of gene therapy.

Dr. Dr. van Beers will discuss the consequences of chronic anemia in sickle cell disease and currently available treatment options. He will describe the therapeutic mechanisms of action of PK activators that may improve anemia, reduce hemolysis, and reduce HbS polymerization and sickling in sickle cell disease. This talk will review the existing evidence as well as additional considerations for the use of PK activators in the treatment of sickle cell disease.

Dr. Kevin Kuo will outline current challenges in the management of thalassemia. He will review preclinical data of PK activation in thalassemia and the mechanism by which this may lead to improvement of anemia in patients with thalassemia. Dr. Kuo will discuss existing evidence of the efficacy and safety of PK activators in thalassemia and considerations of which patients should be considered for clinical trials.

Chair:

Rachael F. Grace, MD
Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

Speakers:

Rachael F. Grace, MD
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston, MA
Pyruvate Kinase Activators for Treatment of Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Eduard J. Van Beers, MD,PhD
University Medical Centre Utrecht
Utrecht, Netherlands
Pyruvate Kinase Activators: Targeting Red Cell Metabolism in Sickle Cell Disease

Kevin H.M. Kuo, MD, FRCPC, MSc
University Health Network
Toronto, ON, Canada
Pyruvate Kinase Activators: Targeting Red Cell Metabolism in Thalassemia

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Goldilocks and Transplant Timing in Inherited Marrow Failure Syndromes: Too Early, Too Late, Just Right?


Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 11

Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) often carry a risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia, but hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to prevent transformation may result in early mortality. Advances in monitoring for clonal evolution as well as tailored transplant approaches promise to change the risk:benefit ratio. This session will describe the state-of-the art in molecular tracking and transplant for IBMFS, how these are being exploited to determine optimal timing of interventions, and challenges and prospects for improving outcomes.

Dr. Kristen Schratz will discuss the landscape of somatic genetic alterations seen in children and adults with bone marrow failure and their relevance to caring for patients and assessing the risk of myeloid malignancy. Particular focus will be on SAMD9/9L, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and short telomere syndromes.

Dr. Suneet Agarwal will discuss determinants of HCT timing in patients with IBMFS, and the impact of improved diagnosis, surveillance, and disease-specific minimal intensity transplant approaches in recent years. Cases will illustrate the conundrum for providers and patients seeking to pre-empt the evolution to hematologic malignancy and disease-associated co-morbidities while balancing the risks of HCT.

Dr. Kasiani Myers will focus on current knowledge of late effects after HCT for IBMFS and overlap with the natural history of these disorders starting with cases that highlight the importance of long-term monitoring in this setting.  The talk will address the potential impact of lower intensity regimens, outline disease specific monitoring strategies to evaluate ongoing treatment and disease related complications, and discuss future strategies to further tailor data driven disease specific approaches.

Chair:

Suneet Agarwal, MD, PhD
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston, MA

Speakers:

Kristen E. Schratz, MD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, MD
Clonal Evolution in Inherited Marrow Failure Syndromes Predicts Disease Progression

Suneet Agarwal, MD, PhD
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston, MA
Minimal Intensity Conditioning Strategies for Bone Marrow Failure – Is It Time for “Preventative” Transplants?

Kasiani Myers, MD
2. Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati, OH
Post-transplant Complications in Patients With Marrow Failure Syndromes--Are We Improving Long Term Outcomes?

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Hematologic Toxicity of Immunotherapies


Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6DE
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6DE
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6DE
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 6DE

Chair:

Frederick L. Locke, MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa, FL

Speakers:

Frederick L. Locke, MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa, FL
Hematologic Toxicity of CAR-T

Michael Kroll, MD
MD Anderson Cancer Ctr.
Houston, TX
Hematologic Toxicity of Checkpoint Inhibitors

Martin Hutchings, MD, PhD
Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen
Copenhagen, Denmark
Hematologic Toxicity of Bispecific Antibody Therapies

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Hematologists and the Care of Pregnant Women


Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 25
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 25
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 25
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 25

This session, dedicated to the memory and legacy of Dr Claire McLintock, will provide examples of the clinical roles played by hematologists in caring for patients during pregnancy. Dr Adam Lewkowitz will provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency in pregnancy including appropriate management to improve outcome for both mother and baby and a discussion of treatment options in pregnancy. Dr Andra James will provide an evidence-based overview of the management of patients with bleeding disorders in pregnancy, highlighting the importance of multidisciplinary care. Dr Fionnuala Ní Áinle will review the prevention, diagnosis and management of venous thromboembolism in pregnancy and will discuss ongoing and recently published landmark clinical trials.

Chair:

Fionnuala Ni Ainle, MD, PhD
Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, University College Dublin
Dublin 7, Ireland

Speakers:

Andra H James, MD
Duke
Durham, NC
Management of Pregnant Women Who Have Bleeding Disorders

Adam K Lewkowitz, MD
Brown University School of Medicine, Women and Infants Hospital In Rhode Island
Providence, RI
Identifying and Treating Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy

Fionnuala Ni Ainle, MD, PhD
Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, University College Dublin
Dublin 7, Ireland
Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of PE & DVT in Pregnant Women

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Hematologists as Lifesavers: Inpatient Hematology Emergencies


Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina, Marriott Grand Ballroom 5-6

Hematologists make a huge impact by managing inpatient hematology emergencies. These may be life-threatening conditions or those that could become life-threatening if not managed quickly and capably. One of the challenges is the need to start treatments while diagnostic tests are in process, and often there is diagnostic uncertainty for a while. Sometimes these conditions require urgent transfer to tertiary care centers. Evidence-based interventions and consensus guidelines are not available for many inpatient hematology emergency conditions. In this session, expert opinions are presented for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL), Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) with life-threatening bleeding, and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH).

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is an inpatient hematology emergency in which patients present with life-threatening risk of intracranial hemorrhage. A hitherto highly fatal disease, APL has transformed into the most curable acute myeloid leukemia in adults since the introduction of differentiating agents, all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide. Still, early mortality constitutes a significant proportion of deaths attributed to APL, with hemorrhage being the most common cause. In this presentation, Dr. Martin Tallman discusses strategies to prevent early mortality among newly diagnosed APL patients.

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) with life-threatening bleeding is an inpatient hematology emergency, usually presenting with extremely low platelet counts. Urgent assessment and treatment are required, including quickly excluding other causes of low platelet counts. Combination treatment usually include simultaneous corticosteroids and intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), platelet transfusions, and anti-fibrinolytic agents. In this presentation, Dr. Steven Fein describes the challenges associated with identifying and treating adult ITP patients who have life-threatening bleeding.

Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an inpatient hematology emergency in which patients present with life-threatening systemic inflammation. In this presentation, Dr. Adi Zoref-Lorenz will outline the approach to the recognition and rapid assessment of HLH syndromes in critically ill inpatients. The importance of the newly described "OHI index" in hematologic malignancy-associated HLH will be highlighted. She will discuss the recognition and management of pertinent HLH triggers. The talk will provide practical guidance regarding immunosuppressive therapy and the emergence of novel targeted agents for HLH.

Chair:

Steven Fein, MD, MPH
Heme Onc Call
Miami, FL

Speakers:

Martin S. Tallman, MD
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago, IL
How to Avoid Early Mortality in APL

Steven Fein, MD, MPH
Heme Onc Call
Miami, FL
How to manage ITP with life-threatening bleeding

Adi Zoref-Lorenz, MD
Hematology Institute, Meir Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University
KFAR-SABA, Israel
Inpatient Recognition and Management of HLH

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Hemostasis in Patients With Severe Liver Disease


Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 31
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 31
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 31
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 31

Advanced chronic liver disease results in complex changes to hemostasis due to changes in liver synthetic function, portal hypertension with consequent hypersplenism, and endothelial activation. Patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk of both bleeding, predominantly due to portal hypertension and thrombosis, typically involving the portal vasculature. This education session reviews the laboratory assessment of hemostasis in patients with cirrhosis, management of peri-procedural bleeding risk. Finally, management of splanchnic vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis is discussed, including the approach in patients who present with gastrointestinal bleeding or with thrombocytopenia, and the role of direct oral anticoagulants.

Prof Ton Lisman will present the current understanding of hemostasis in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. Currently available routine and research laboratory assays will be presented with regard to their role, interpretation and limitations in the evaluation of hemostasis in this patient group.

Dr Lara Roberts will discuss how to evaluate the peri-procedural bleeding risk of patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The role and limitations of the available hemostatic therapies for prevention of procedural bleeding will be explored. Dr Roberts will present societal guidance recommendations for clinical practice and highlight priorities for future research.

Prof Walter Ageno will initially focus on the association between advanced chronic liver disease, and splanchnic vein thrombosis. Prof Ageno will discuss the challenges in the initial management of splanchnic vein thrombosis in this patient group, with particular emphasis on patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding, or at high risk of bleeding due to thrombocytopenia and/or esophageal varices. Finally, the talk will review the available evidence for risks and benefits of anticoagulation in this setting, including the role of the direct oral anticoagulants.

Chair:

Lara N Roberts, MD,MBBS
King's College Hospital
LONDON, United Kingdom

Speakers:

Ton Lisman, PhD
University Medical Centre Groningen
Groningen, Netherlands
How to Assess Hemostasis in Patients with Severe Liver Disease

Lara N Roberts, MD,MBBS
King's College Hospital
LONDON, ENG, United Kingdom
How to Manage Hemostasis in Patients with Liver Disease During Interventions

Walter Ageno, MD
University of Insubria
Varese, Italy
How to Manage Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Patients with Liver Disease

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Hot Topics in Blood Donation: Donor Risks and Social Justice


Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Hall A
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Hall A
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Hall A
Sunday, December 10, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Hall A

For years, men who have sex with men (MSM) were banned from donating blood to reduce the risk of transfusion-transmitted HIV. Several countries, including the US, have recently instituted individualized risk assessment policies to try to balance fairness to potential donors with the safety of the blood supply. Meeting the demand for blood products also requires balancing patient needs with the safety of volunteer blood donors. This session will review evolving policies for selecting blood donors as well as two potential hematologic consequences of frequent donation, clonal hematopoiesis and T-cell lymphopenia.

Chair:

Richard M Kaufman, MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

Speakers:

Mindy Goldman, MD
Canadian Blood Services
Ottawa, ON, Canada
MSM and Blood Donation: Shifting to Individualized Risk Assessment

Darja Karpova, MD
Washington University in St. Louis
Saint Louis, MO
Clonal hematopoiesis in Frequent Whole Blood Donors

Richard M Kaufman, MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA
T-cell Lymphopenia in Frequent Platelet Donors

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Improving Outcomes for Individuals With Sickle Cell Disease: Are We Moving the Needle?


Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Monday, December 11, 2023
4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29

Sickle cell disease (SCD) can lead to debilitating morbidity and premature mortality. Over the past decade, 3 new drugs have been FDA-approved for treating children and adults with SCD, and many others are actively being studied. Similarly, novel curative approaches are increasingly becoming available. Unfortunately, a paucity of data exists regarding whether outcomes are improving in individuals with SCD. 

Dr. Ken Ataga will discuss disease-modifying therapies that are currently FDA-approved and some of the most promising drugs that are underway.

Dr. Adetola Kassim will describe the most recent outcomes of haploidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation compared to more traditional approaches. He will also compare the pros and cons of various haploidentical platforms that are currently available.

Dr. John Tisdale will discuss the encouraging results of gene therapy and gene editing trials for patients with SCD and the remaining challenges.

Chair:

Courtney D. Fitzhugh, MD
NIH (Hematology)
Bethesda, MD

Speakers:

Kenneth I. Ataga, MD
University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center
Memphis, TN
Using Disease Modifying Therapies in Sickle Cell Disease

Adetola A. Kassim, MBBS,MS
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, TN
The Range of Haploidentical Transplant Protocols in Sickle Cell Disease: All Haplos Are Not Created Equally

John F. Tisdale, MD
NIH
Bethesda, MD
Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease

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Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes - From Pediatrics to Adult


Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 24
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 24
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 24
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 24

The inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are increasingly recognized as an underlying cause of aplastic anemia and hematologic malignancy, even in adults. Clinical presentations vary depending on the underlying germline defect and patients may present variably and with only subtle findings suggestive of IBMFS. Fanconi anemia (FA) and telomere biology disorders (TBD) represent the commonest IBMFS; both have traditionally been considered disorders of early childhood but are increasingly being recognized in adolescents and adults, sometimes in the absence of BMF. In this session, first a practical overview will be given of clinical and laboratory features that can be used to recognize and diagnose the IBMFS in the hematology clinic. Next, both FA and TBD will be discussed in greater detail, outlining the presentation and management of these complex disorders with a focus on adolescents and adults.

Dr. Emma Groarke will review the clinical and laboratory features that can be used to distinguish immune from inherited bone marrow failure. She will discuss the increasing spectrum of IBMFS being recognized in adolescents and adults, the merits and usage of specialized testing, and the role of germline genetic testing. Additionally, she will highlight why proper identification of IBMFS in the clinic is crucial for optimal patient management.

Dr. Timothy Olson will address the unique challenges and evidence-based practice recommendations for the management of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with FA. Specifically, he will discuss the increased frequency of FA diagnosis in AYA patients, improved long-term survival of children with FA following matched sibling and alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) performed for BMF, and the expanding need for long-term monitoring in patients achieving hematologic stabilization following ex vivo gene therapy. 

Dr. Marena Niewisch will focus on the specific characteristics of TBD in adults and the differences in both presentation and genetic background compared with childhood-onset disease. She will outline the clinical clues that should raise suspicion for an underlying TBD and prompt further diagnostic. Necessary surveillance measures will be outlined, and potential therapy options addressed.

Chair:

Emma M. Groarke, MD
NIH
Bethesda, MD

Speakers:

Emma M. Groarke, MD
NIH
Bethesda, MD
When to Consider Inherited Marrow Failure Syndromes in Adults

Timothy S. Olson, MD,PhD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
Management of Fanconi Anemia Beyond Childhood

Marena R. Niewisch, MD
Hannover Medical School
Hannover, Germany
Clinical Manifestations of Telomere Biology Disorders in Adults

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Ongoing Challenges in the Management of VTE


Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29

Ongoing Challenges in the Management of Venous Thromboembolism Hematologists are frequently asked to evaluate and manage patients with thrombosis. While categorizing venous thromboembolism (VTE) as "provoked" vs "unprovoked" is an important determinant of recurrence risk, it is not always straightforward to classify thrombotic events as some risk factors are minor and transient (i.e., "minimally" provoked) while others are persistent. Furthermore, multiple risk factors may be present. This has led some to recommend that the terms be abandoned. Dr. Cecilia Becattini will discuss the role of major, minor, and persistent risk factors in the development of VTE. Clinical assessment of the risk factors in an individual patient allows for an estimate of the recurrence risk and a decision as to the need for long-term anticoagulation. Hematologists are often referred patients with abnormal coagulation tests (elevated D-dimer or Factor VIII coagulant activity, low levels of protein C or protein S); they will also encounter abnormal results of tests (e.g., MTHFR, PAI-1 promoter polymorphisms) with which they may be unfamiliar that carry little if any thrombotic risk. Through a series of cases, Dr. Kenneth Bauer will discuss the ramifications of such testing (“do’s, don’ts, and nuances”) on management. Dr. Keith McCrae will review three clinical cases that raise perplexing questions about management of the antiphospholipid syndrome, including the significance of IgM antiphospholipid antibodies, whether to switch from a DOAC to warfarin, and considerations on how to treat an asymptomatic patient with antiphospholipid antibodies. Definitive data to inform management of such patients is often lacking, forcing the practitioner to rely upon expert opinion and patient preference in decision making.

Chair:

Kenneth A Bauer, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, MA

Speakers:

Cecilia Becattini, MD
University of Perugia
Perugia, Italy
Provoked vs Minimally Provoked vs Unprovoked VTE—Does it Matter?

Kenneth A Bauer, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, MA
Talk #1 The Do’s, Don’ts, and Nuances of Thrombophilia Testing

Keith R. McCrae, MD
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, OH
How to Diagnose and Manage Antiphospholipid Syndrome

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The Iron Revolution!


Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Sunday, December 10, 2023
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D

A revolution is defined as a great and sudden change. Our speakers will discuss how in iron deficiency we need to change how we use laboratory tests to diagnose iron deficiency to insure we are correctly diagnosing ALL with iron deficiency and not just the select few with severe iron depletion.  For therapy we need to recognized oral iron either fails or is not appropriate for many patients and that intravenous iron is safe and effective

Dr. Deloughery will discuss what ferritin is and why it is used as a measure of body iron stores.  Then he will demonstrate the high incidence of iron deficiency in women - up to 50% of healthy women with absent iron stores on bone marrow exam.  Finally, he will advocate that ferritin cuts off need to be much higher to properly diagnose iron deficiency in all affected women and the implications of such a change. 

In this section on The Iron Revolution, Dr Auerbach will be highlighting the administration of the four available iron products permitting complete replacement dosing in a single setting. He will discuss methods of administration, safety, and indications. Most importantly he will dispel notions of danger created by antiquated folklore and show a video of a minor infusion reaction, how to manage it, and how the inappropriate intervention for the minor reaction can lead to a hemodynamically significant serious adverse event ostensibly and inappropriately ascribed to the IV iron. 

Dr Powers will discuss that iron deficiency anemia occurs most commonly in young children due to low iron diet and adolescent girls due to menstrual blood loss. However, children with gastrointestinal conditions such as intestinal failure, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and/or other chronic conditions including chronic kidney disease and heart failure, also commonly have iron deficiency. In children who have an incomplete response to oral iron, intravenous iron therapy is increasingly being utilized with benefits such as rapid repletion of iron stores, in addition to resolution of anemia, less gastrointestinal side effects, and relief for patients and families struggling with long-term iron supplementation. Four intravenous iron formulations have approved indications in pediatrics and many are increasingly utilized off-label in children as well. Here we discuss the indications and appropriate timing of intravenous iron therapy in children with a wide range of underlying etiologies. 

Chair:

Thomas G Deloughery, MD
Oregon Health and Science Univ.
Portland, OR

Speakers:

Thomas G Deloughery, MD
Oregon Health and Science Univ.
Portland, OR
Sex, Lies, and Iron Deficiency: A Call to Change Ferritin Reference Ranges

Michael Auerbach, MD
Auerbach Hem-Onc Associates, Inc.
Baltimore, MD
IV Iron Formulations and Use in Adults

Jacquelyn Powers, MD
Baylor College of Medicine/ Texas Children's Hospital
Houston, TX
Intravenous Iron Therapy in Pediatrics: Who Should Get It and When Is the Right Time?

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Transfusion Support in Sickle Cell Disease


Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D
Saturday, December 9, 2023
2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 28 A-D

In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), transfusion, by modifying the hemoglobin (Hb)A/HbS red blood cell (RBC) ratio, remains a major treatment to prevent or treat acute vaso-occlusive or chronic complications. Dr. Anoosha Habibi will discuss the indications for transfusion during pregnancy. Pregnancy is a high-risk situation for both mother and child. Recent studies and meta-analyses tend to favor transfusion during pregnancy, but no randomized studies have been conducted to date. The frequency of transfusion complications in pregnant women, such as post-transfusion hyperhemolysis, makes decision-making difficult. As recommended by the ASH guidelines, the decision should be made case-by-case, based on each patient's transfusion history and complications associated with SCD. Dr. Shannon Kelly will review the different transfusion methods that are available when transfusion is indicated : simple RBC transfusion or RBC exchange which can be automated or manual. The role of these different methods depends not only on local resources, but also on the transfusion indication and a number of patient-dependent parameters. Risks and benefits will be discussed. Dr. France Pirenne will define the patients at risk for transfusion: they are those who previously developed RBC antibodies and/or post-transfusion hyperhemolysis. In these situations, prevention of additional reactions with specific transfusion protocols is necessary, immunosupressive therapy is frequently given, and close transfusion monitoring is implemented. In patients with severe disease, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be indicated. However, transfusion is also required in this context, and its management is complex as transfusion risks must be taken into account.

Chair:

France Pirenne, MD, PhD
Université Paris-Est Créteil , Henri Mondor Hospital
Créteil, France

Speakers:

Anoosha Habibi, MD
Henri-Mondor University Hospital- UPEC, AP-HP
Creteil Cedex, FRA
Managing Pregnancy in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease from a Transfusion Perspective

Shannon Kelly
UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland
Oakland, CA
Logistics, Risks and Benefits of Automated Red Blood Cell Exchange for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

France Pirenne, MD, PhD
Université Paris-Est Créteil , Henri Mondor Hospital
Créteil, France
Alloimmunization and Hyperhemolysis in Sickle Cell Disease

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Why Am I Getting Paged at 2AM? Microangiopathic Emergencies


Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29
Saturday, December 9, 2023
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

San Diego Convention Center, Room 29

Life threatening classical hematology disorders including the thrombotic microangiopathies and coagulopathies in critically ill patients often present as medical emergencies, requiring rapid evaluation and treatment to optimize outcomes. Dr. Jennifer McIntosh will discuss microangiopathic emergencies in pregnancy focusing on the diagnosis and management of preeclampsia with severe features, HELLP Syndrome, and DIC, which are the most common causes of microangiopathic emergencies. She will also review when other microangiopathic emergencies (Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy, TTP, Complement Mediated microangiopathy, antiphospholipid syndrome) should be considered instead. Dr. Shruti Chaturvedi will discuss the critical first 24 hours in evaluating a patient with a possible thrombotic microangiopathy focusing on how to rapidly identify and treat patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura (TTP) and complement mediated TMA. Dr. Beverley Hunt will review consumptive coagulopathy in the ICU covering conditions ranging from the hemostatic effects of major hemorrhage to the use of extracorporeal circuits and true disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). She will review the current understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of common consumptive coagulopathy in critically ill patients, with particular emphasis on DIC because it is a common and often life-threatening condition in critical care patients.

Chair:

Shruti Chaturvedi, MBBS
Johns Hopskins University
Baltimore, MD

Speakers:

Jennifer Jury McIntosh, DO
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI
Labor and Delivery: DIC, HELLP, Pre-eclampsia

Shruti Chaturvedi, MBBS
Johns Hopskins University
Baltimore, MD
Medical Consult—aHUS, TTP—How to Distinguish and What to Do

A Retter, MBBS
Guys and St. Thomas
London, United Kingdom
Consumptive Coagulopathy in the ICU

65th ASH Annual Meeting Registration

San Diego Convention Center

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