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Programs

Annual Meeting Sessions on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

As a global hematology community, ASH understands the importance of having individuals with diverse perspectives and experiences in all areas of the field. As a subspecialty in medicine, we are all striving to improve the outcomes for individuals with hematologic diseases. One tool in our toolkit to improve outcomes is a deeper understanding of causes of disparities in outcomes for our patients. We invite you to learn more and participate in the following sessions at the 64th ASH Annual Meeting to learn more about the science of how differences in identity impact outcomes and how to mitigate those differences and achieve equitable outcomes for all individuals with hematologic diseases and disorders.


Education Program

Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Improving Outcomes in Challenging Subsets


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 9:30 a.m. - 10: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Great Hall BC

The therapeutic landscape for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) patients has undergone a remarkable transformation in the past five years.  The addition of small molecule inhibitors, such as BCL-2, IDH, and FLT3 inhibitors, have led to increased treatment options and improved outcomes for many patients.  However, despite these advancements, the majority of patients will not be cured of their disease.  Measurable residual disease (MRD) testing in remission after treatment for AML can identify patients at increased risk of relapse and death. There are also ongoing efforts investigating novel therapeutics for high-risk AML patient subsets to improve current unacceptable poor outcomes.  This educational session will examine the current evidence for integrating MRD into response assessments and as a potential treatment goal for patients.  The session will also discuss ongoing investigational efforts to improve outcomes in high-risk AML patient subsets such as secondary AML and the genomic subsets: MLL rearranged, FLT3-ITD and TP53 mutated.

Dr. Chris Hourigan will outline the evidence and challenges currently for use of MRD testing in AML to inform treatment decision making and management.  Factors such as lack of test harmonization and unclear clinical utility for individual patients have limited widespread adoption of AML MRD testing in clinical practice. He will also discuss the current multiple national-level precision medicine efforts now ongoing to both develop optimal testing and validate AML MRD negativity as a goal of therapy.

Dr. Keith Pratz will present case-based approaches to suggest best practices for current treatment approaches for patients with secondary AML including those with prior chemotherapy exposure or arising from antecedent hematologic malignancy.  He will discuss ongoing opportunities and challenges for these high-risk patient populations and ongoing research efforts to improve upon the current poor outcomes of these patients.  

Dr. Alice Mims will discuss current ongoing investigational efforts to improve patient outcomes in particular high risk AML molecular subsets: TP53 mutated, MLL or KMT2A rearranged, and FLT3-ITD mutated disease.  This talk will examine best current treatment approaches for patients with these specific genomic features along with completed and ongoing research endeavors including novel approaches with immunotherapeutics and targeted small molecule inhibitors.  

Chair:

Alice S. Mims , MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH

Speakers:

Christopher S Hourigan
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda,  MD
Achieving MRD Negativity in AML: How Important Is This and How Do We Get There?

Keith W. Pratz , MD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Optimizing Outcomes in Secondary AML

Alice S. Mims , MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Novel Investigational Approaches for High Risk Molecular Subsets: TP53, MLL, FLT3

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Anxiety Provoking Consultations: Mast Cells and Eosinophils


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 295-296

Dr. Cem Akin will discuss various clinical presentations and referral scenarios for mast cell disorders in the hematology practice, and when and how to initiate further diagnostic workup and how to interpret the results. He will review differential diagnosis of a patient with elevated tryptase level including hereditary alpha tryptasemia, and mastocytosis. He will discuss treatment options for mast cell activation symptoms including new tyrosine kinase inhibitors in indolent systemic mastocytosis.

Dr. Amy Klion will review the differential diagnosis of marked eosinophilia and classification of hypereosinophilic syndromes.  She will provide a general approach to treatment of patients with idiopathic and lymphocyte-driven hypereosinophilic syndromes, focusing on eosinophil-targeted biologics. Lastly, Dr. Klion will briefly discuss the potential risks of eosinophil depletion.

Dr. Jason Gotlib will navigate the treatment of advanced systemic mastocytosis (AdvSM) and primary eosinophilic neoplasms including chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) and myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with fusion tyrosine kinases (MLN-eo).  He will review the latest data and future directions of using KIT inhibition in AdvSM, with an emphasis on the challenge of SM with an associated hematologic neoplasm.  Lastly, Dr. Gotlib will survey the molecular landscape of primary eosinophilic neoplasms and opportunities for targeted therapy, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors in MLN-eo with rearranged PDGFRA/B, FGFR1, JAK2, FLT3, and ABL1.

Chair:

Jason Gotlib , MD,MS
Stanford Cancer Center
Stanford,  CA

Speakers:

Cem Akin , MD, PhD
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor,  MI
How to Evaluate the Patient with a Suspected Mast Cell Disorder and How/When to Manage Symptoms

Amy D Klion , MD
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda,  MD
How to Evaluate the Patient with a Suspected Eosinophil Disorder and How/When to Manage Symptoms

Jason Gotlib , MD,MS
Stanford Cancer Center
Stanford,  CA
Available and Emerging Therapies for Bona Fide Advanced Systemic Mastocytosis and Primary Eosinophilic Neoplasms

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Are Alternative Donors Now Mainstream in Allogeneic Transplant?


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Great Hall BC

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only potential curative treatment for most of malignant and some of the non-malignant hematological disorders. Recent studies comparing donor to no donor treatment in transplant eligible patients have shown better outcomes in patients undergoing HCT. Donor availability has been one of the important access obstacles to this curative therapy since matched sibling donor availability has been reported to be only ~30%. Matched unrelated donor (MUD) availability is in the 20-40% range for African- and Hispanic- Americans and donor availability is even lower in mixed race and ethnicity which has not been accurately estimated in published data. These estimates are even lower counting to HLA typing, medical deferrals, and suitability related issues. In the absence of a MSD or MUD, alternative donor choices including: haploidentical related (HAPLO), mismatched unrelated (MMUD) and umbilical cord blood (UCB) all have contributed to improve access and outcome of patients who are otherwise eligible for HCT.

Mr. Stephen Spellman will discuss HLA matching and impact on HCT outcomes. He will use a case-based approach focusing on the likelihood of availability by donor type by patient ethnic background considering matched sibling donors and alternative donors, including matched and mismatched unrelated, cord blood and haploidentical related donors. His talk will address complete HLA match by donor type, discussion of areas with limited data available and current controversies warranting future research. 

 

Dr. Monzr Al Malki will discuss the rapid growth on the use of alternative donors in HCT; specifically, in MMUD setting, including historical data and outcome analysis using conventional calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis, optimal choice among multiple MMUDs available using different mis/matching criteria, and the importance of avoiding donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in mitigating the risk of graft rejection. Dr. Al Malki later described current novel approaches to improve outcomes in MMUD HCT including post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) and Abatacept (ABA), discussing some of the main differences between these novel approaches and active clinical trial.

Dr. Arnon Nagler will debate the HAPLO donor vs UCB as graft source options based on the currently available data. This discussion should give some guidance and help the transplant physician to choose among a haploidentical versus a cord blood donor.  Although the number of HAPLO transplants (mainly non-T cell-depleted haplo transplants with post-transplant cyclophosphamide) is increasing while UCB is decreasing worldwide, recent developments in UCB and especially cord blood expansion and other strategies to improve engraftment and immune reconstitution post-UCB make UCB as a valuable option. Given the limited numbers of published or ongoing well-designed randomized controlled trials, the decision to perform haplo transplant or CBT in each patient depends not only on the patient, disease and donor characteristics and availability (although most if not all patients should have in principle an alternative donor) but also on the transplant physician discretion and most importantly center experience, preference and center’s ongoing clinical trials and strategies.

Chair:

Monzr M. Al Malki , MD
City of Hope National Medical Center
Duarte,  CA

Speakers:

Monzr M. Al Malki , MD
City of Hope National Medical Center
Duarte,  CA
New Strategies for Mismatched Unrelated Donors

Stephen R. Spellman
National Marrow Donor Program
Minneapolis,  MN
What Is Complete HLA Match in 2022?

Arnon Nagler , MD
Chaim Sheba Medical Center
Tel Hashomer,  Israel
In 2022, Which is Preferred: Haploidentical or Cord Transplant?

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Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall E

 

The importance of the immune system in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment was first demonstrated in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant. Unfortunately this early immunotherapy approach was significantly limited by transplant-associated morbidity and mortality. Since antibody-based immunotherapies have emerged as an important aspect of therapy for all MM patients, positively impacting survival. Novel antibody formats, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells and non-cellular immune approaches demonstrate the vast possibilities for further innovation and offer new hope in a yet incurable disease.

Dr. Paula Rodriguez Otero will outline the current state of approved BCMA-directed CAR T-cell therapy in advanced MM as well as future developments focused on optimizing patient care and novel CAR designs. BCMA-directed CAR T-cells have shown unprecedented efficacy in heavily pre-treated MM leading to the approval of two BCMA CAR-T cell products. Still, no plateau is seen in the survival curves and relapses continue to occur. Therefore, further improvement is needed. Potential strategies including earlier use in MM as well as next generation CARs, to further augment efficacy will be discussed.

Dr. Suzanne Trudel will discuss the evolving therapeutic landscape of antibodies in MM including the use of naked antibodies in the frontline setting. Advances in antibody design have resulted in antibodies with improved properties to maximize efficacy that includes bispecific antibodies and antibody drug conjugates (ADCs). Belantamab mafodotin is an approved ADC-targeting BCMA, while BMCA-targeting bispecifics will soon be approved for commercial use. The efficacy of these novel antibodies in advanced MM, as well as the unique safety considerations of these agents will be discussed.

Dr. Sarah Holstein will provide an overview of non-cellular immunotherapy approaches to add to the MM therapeutic armamentarium. While CARs and novel antibodies are rapidly being developed, there continues to be a focus on non-cellular therapies that harness the immune system. The class of drugs that target the cereblon complex has expanded beyond the original immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) to include next-generation cereblon E3 ligase modulators (CELMoDs). Ongoing studies are evaluating the potential of adding novel agents including repurposed drugs to IMiDs/CELMoDs. Other novel immunotherapies under development include immunocytokines, immunotoxins and NK cell activators/engagers.

Chair:

Suzanne Trudel
McLaughlin Centre for Molecular Medicine
Toronto,  ON, Canada

Speakers:

Paula Rodriguez Otero , MD, PhD
Servicio de Hematología y Hemoterapia, Clínica Universidad de Navarra
Pamplona,  Spain
Cellular Therapy for Multiple Myeloma: What’s Now and What’s Next

Suzanne Trudel
McLaughlin Centre for Molecular Medicine
Toronto,  ON, Canada
Antibodies and Bispecifics for Multiple Myeloma: Effective Effector Therapy

Sarah A. Holstein , MD,PhD
University of Nebraska Medical Center
Omaha,  NE
Beyond the Cell: Novel Non-Cellular Immunotherapy Approaches to Multiple Myeloma

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Late Effects of Curative Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall E

Chair:

Courtney D. Fitzhugh , MD
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda,  MD

Speakers:

Courtney D. Fitzhugh , MD
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda,  MD
Knowledge to Date on Secondary Malignancy

Shalini Shenoy , MD
Washington University School of Medicine
Saint Louis,  MO
Organ Function Indications and Potential Improvements

Debra Friedman , MD
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
Nashville,  TN
Long-term health effects of curative therapies for SCD

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Managing Thrombocytopenia in Challenging Situations


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 243-245

Thrombocytopenia is one of the most common reasons for both inpatient and outpatient hematology consultation. Chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopenia of chronic liver disease, and thrombocytopenia in the pregnant patient are frequently encountered and often challenging clinical situations, and optimal management in these situations can be elusive. New data for the use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists in these patients in specific situations offers opportunities for updated and modernized treatment paradigms but also raise many questions.

Dr. Hanny Al-Samkari will discuss new data for the use of the thrombopoietin receptor agonists to treat patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia and how this data guides optimal and safe use of these agents in clinical practice.

Dr. Adam Cuker will describe the clinical consequences and optimal management of thrombocytopenia of chronic liver disease, including a discussion of the thrombopoietin receptor agonists now approved to treat these patients in the periprocedural setting.

Dr. Allyson Pishko will discuss the diagnostic challenges of thrombocytopenia in the pregnant patient as well as new data available regarding the management of pregnant patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

Chair:

Hanny Al-Samkari , MD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Hanny Al-Samkari , MD
Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Boston,  MA
Chemotherapy-Induced Thrombocytopenia

Adam Cuker , MD, MS
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Thrombocytopenia in Liver Disease

Allyson M Pishko , MD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy

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Multiple Myeloma: Assessing the Patient and the Disease


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 9:30 a.m. - 10: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Great Hall AD

The treatment paradigm of multiple myeloma (MM) has dramatically changed over the past decade, offering many patients the chance for excellent disease control and longer survival. However, not every patient can tolerate the intensity of some interventions, while a subset of MM patients with high-risk disease likely should receive escalated therapy. In addition, the proper and complete assessment and categorization of patients is therefore mandatory.  This educational session will explore emerging evidence in the assessment and management of newly diagnosed and relapsed MM patients and cover clinical, diagnostic, and radiographic evaluations.

Dr. Ciara Freeman will focus on the older, transplant ineligible myeloma patient population. Providers who treat myeloma will see an increasing volume of elderly patients for initial evaluation and subsequent lines of therapy. Older MM adults are more likely to be under- than over-treated, and therefore more objective (and ideally straightforward) ways to evaluate their fitness and ability to tolerate therapy will increasingly assist in decision making. The aim of this review is to highlight some of the approaches possible, how results might inform treatment selection, and illustrate ways that patients can be optimized for, rather than excluded from, the more complex therapies newly available.

Dr. Timothy Schmidt will discuss the challenges of defining and identifying high risk myeloma. A significant number of MM patients experience dramatically shorter disease-free intervals compared to “standard risk” patients. Dr. Schmidt will cover the development of both various biologic and molecular markers, as well as clinical data that can be used to define risk. In addition, he will review various treatment strategies that are explicitly employed for this group of patients.  

Dr. Taxiarchis Kourelis will explore recent developments in minimal residual disease testing, imaging, new biomarkers and their roles in risk assessment. The incorporation of more modern techniques such as 18FDG-positive emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in various iterations, have led to an appreciation of the spacial heterogeneity of myeloma tumor deposits encountered among myeloma patients and to the realization of the inadequacy of traditional bone surveys. Dr. Kourelis will also review recent data that underscore the predictive power of such techniques to stratify risk and help guide treatment decision. He will also consider the role of MRD testing and the use of mass spectrometry to predict risk of progression and relapse. 

Chair:

Natalie Callander , MD
University of Wisconsin
Madison,  WI

Speakers:

Ciara L. Freeman , MSc,FRCPath,MBBChir,MRCP
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa,  FL
Fitness and Frailty in Myeloma

Timothy Martin Schmidt , MD
University of Wisconsin
Madison,  WI
High or Low? Assessing Disease Risk in Multiple Myeloma

Taxiarchis Kourelis , MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
The Burden of Myeloma: Novel Approaches to Disease Assessment

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Novel Approaches in MDS


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 288-290

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized clinically by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, reflective of ineffective hematopoiesis, and usually accompanied by one or more peripheral cytopenias. This session will focus on the rapid advances in both diagnosis and treatment in the entire spectrum of the clinical presentation of MDS. The identification of various molecular mutations that impact the pathogenesis of the disease has resulted in new molecularly defined subtypes of MDS and a new prognostic classification, the IPSS-M. This has also led to advances in our understanding of the evolution of cytopenias to low risk MDS and the role of clonal hematopoiesis (CH) and inflammation in this process. This is an emerging area in the field of MDS where identification, close observation, and possibly early treatment of these entities may form part of the future strategy of the care of the MDS patient.Lastly, this session will detail the innovative therapies in combination with hypomethylating gents that are moving forward in the treatment of high risk MDS and their role in the treatment of MDS with various molecular mutations.

Dr. Mario Cazzola will discuss the increasing importance of gene sequencing  and the role of molecular mutational data in the diagnosis and  risk stratification of MDS. New molecularly-defined MDS entities in the updated pathology classifications will be discussed. The Molecular International Prognostic Scoring System for MDS (IPSS-M) which incorporates molecular mutational data into MDS risk classification, will also be illustrated, using a case-based approach.

Dr. Amit Verma will discuss the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of ineffective hematopoiesis and cytopenias in MDS. He will outline the various inflammatory mediators that are elevated in MDS, including the TGF-beta pathways as well as inflammatory cascades triggered by spliceosome mutations in MDS. He will also summarize the translational/clinical efforts targeting these pathways in proposed and ongoing clinical trials.

Dr. Borate will discuss the various advances in clinical trials looking at different combinations with hypomethylating agents that are moving forward in high risk MDS. She will focus on agents that target  various dysregulated pathways in MDS including the BCL-2 pathway, various immunotherapy targeting agents including CD47 and TIM-3 as well as other biomarker and mutation specific agents being explored in high risk MDS. Lastly she will discuss the role of traditional AML chemotherapy agents in this high risk population.

Chair:

Uma Borate , MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH

Speakers:

Mario Cazzola , MD
University of Pavia
Pavia,  Italy
Risk Stratifying MDS in the Time of Precision Medicine

Amit Verma , MD
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Bronx,  NY
Targeting Inflammation in Lower Risk MDS

Uma Borate , MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
New Investigational Combinations For Higher-Risk MDS

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Obstetric Management and Complications in Sickle Cell Disease in High- and Low-Income Countries


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 243-245

Pregnancy in women with sickle cell disease (SCD) is a life-threatening condition. In a pooled analysis from recent obstetric and hematology studies conducted in low- and middle-income settings, maternal death in women with SCD is approximately 2,393 and 4,300 deaths per 100,000 live births with and without multidisciplinary care, respectively. In comparison, the USA and Northern Europe's general maternal mortality rate is approximately 23.8 and 8 deaths per 100,000 live births, respectively.


Dr. Eugenia Vicky Asare will highlight the added value of a combined obstetric and sickle cell disease outpatient and inpatient care program to integrate evidence based-management for SCD-related acute pain, acute chest syndrome, and pulmonary thromboembolism. Using the multidisciplinary SCD obstetrics care approach in Ghana, she will highlight best-integrated clinical practices to decrease SCD-related morbidity and mortality in pregnant women with SCD.


Dr. Bosede Afolabi will speak on the difficulties in diagnosing complications in pregnant women with SCD in LMICs, emphasizing Nigeria, the country with the most significant number of individuals living with SCD worldwide. She will discuss the evidence-based preventive and therapeutic options available to treat pregnant women with SCD and the innovations and adaptations used in LMICs to substitute for limited resources.


Dr. Eugene Oteng-Ntim will discuss the Evidence-Based Management of Pregnant Women with SCD in High-Income Countries.

Chair:

Eugenia Vicky Asare , MBChB
Ghana Institute of Clinical Genetics
Accra,  Ghana

Speakers:

Eugenia Vicky Asare , MBChB
Ghana Institute of Clinical Genetics
Accra,  N/A, Ghana
Acute Pain Episodes, Acute Chest Syndrome, and Pulmonary Thromboembolism in Pregnancy

Bosede Afolabi , DM
University of Lagos College of Medicine
Idi-Araba,  Nigeria
Evidence-Based Obstetric Management of Women with Sickle Cell Disease in Low Income Countries

Eugene Oteng-Ntim , PhD, MBBS
Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
London,  ENG, United Kingdom
Evidence-Based Management of Pregnant Women with Sickle Cell Disease in High Income Countries

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Reproductive and Sexual Health in Sickle Cell Disease


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 9:30 a.m. - 10: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , R06-R09

Reproductive and sexual health challenges associated with sickle cell disease (SCD) are common but under-recognized morbidities. Both males and females with SCD suffer from the disease- or therapy-related challenges impacting negatively on their reproductive and sexual health. Priapism, otherwise rare in the general population, is common among adolescent and adult males with SCD with attendant sequelae of erectile and sexual dysfunctions. Treatment with a disease-modifying agent, hydroxyurea, potentially damages the gonads (testes and ovaries) and could result in infertility. Both SCD and hydroxyurea therapy could damage ovaries, resulting in diminished ovarian reserve and infertility. Curative treatments such as stem cell transplants and gene therapy also pose a significant risk of infertility to both males and females. These challenges have made decision-making on fertility choices difficult for the affected individuals.

 

In this educational session, we will discuss the epidemiology and trends in the management of priapism. We will elaborate on fertility challenges affecting individuals, most especially females, with SCD and provide a template of strategies for engaging patients and their families to guide them in making an informed decision about their treatment choices, mainly as they affect fertility.

 

Dr. Ibrahim Idris will review the clinical epidemiology of priapism and treatments of priapism. He will highlight the burden of priapism and associated mental duress among affected individuals. An aspect of his talk will address priapism treatment gaps and the role of chronic morning dosing with phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors in the secondary prevention of priapism. He will highlight a new therapy with the potential to prevent priapism recurrence.

 


Women with sickle cell disease have complex preconception care needs and at least some have infertility risk factors. Using a case-based approach, Dr. Pecker will address preconception care needs, measures of ovarian reserve and the role of assisted reproductive technologies in the contemporary care of adult women with sickle cell disease.

 

Dr. Lillian Meacham will dive into the unusually explored territory of decision-making in a pediatric setting regarding uncomfortable issues like gonadal and sexual health. Her talk will demonstrate how and when to communicate sensitive topics in clinic settings. She will explain the type of topics to be handled by the hematologist in a regular clinic visit and the sensitive issues requiring a referral to fertility specialists, especially when a decision to offer treatments that are potentially damaging to the gonads is on the table. The engaging talk will highlight the teaching tools available to ease this communication between providers and patients.

Chair:

Ibrahim Musa Idris , MBBS,MPH,FMCPath
Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital
Kano,  Nigeria

Speakers:

Ibrahim Musa Idris , MBBS,MPH,FMCPath
Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital/Bayero University Kano
Kano,  Nigeria
Epidemiology and Treatment of Priapism in Sickle Cell Disease

Lydia H. Pecker , MD
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore,  MD
Fertility of Women with Sickle Cell Disease

Lillian R Meacham , MD
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta,  GA
Decision Making for Reproductive Health in Sickle Cell Disease

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Thrombosis Prevention and Treatment


Monday, December 12, 2022, 4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , R02-R05

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of cardiovascular diseases and related mortality. The optimal prevention and treatment strategies for VTE are essential. The development and generalization of direct oral anticoagulants have significantly advanced the field in recent years. Novel anticoagulants that could potentially provide improved safety are on the horizon. This educational session will first address common questions regarding frequently used oral factor Xa inhibitors by reviewing current literature and providing evidence-based suggestions. Next, controversies and recommendations of optimal VTE prevention strategies for hospitalized medical patients including those with COVID-19 will be discussed. Lastly, the session will explore the upcoming new anticoagulants and strategies for prevention and treatment of VTE, including factor XI inhibitors.

Dr. Tzu-Fei Wang will address five commonly asked questions regarding the use of oral factor Xa inhibitors for the treatment of VTE, including obesity, renal impairment, gastrointestinal malignancy, catheter-related thrombosis, and drug-drug interactions. For each topic, the scope of the problem and pertinent literature will be reviewed. Available guidelines and practice approaches will be discussed.

Dr. Alex Spyropoulos will discuss four controversial topics in thromboprophylaxis of hospitalized acutely-ill medical patients: 1) clinical relevance of key efficacy and safety outcomes incorporated into randomized trials but not incorporated into antithrombotic guidelines on the topic, 2) establishment of individual risk factors or risk models of low bleed risk and high thrombotic risk subgroups of medically ill inpatients that benefit  from extended thromboprophylaxis, 3) the use of mechanical thromboprophylaxis in this population, and 4) thromboprophylaxis of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, a high thrombotic risk subset of medically-ill patients. The clinical and populational health effects of these issues will be discussed, as well implications for future antithrombotic guidelines on these topics.

Dr. Walter Ageno’s talk will initially focus on the unmet clinical needs in the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic disorders. In particular, the difficult management of patients at high risk of bleeding will be briefly discussed. This will provide the background for the development of new classes of anticoagulant drugs, aimed at maximizing antithrombotic efficacy while minimizing the risk of bleeding. Molecules targeting Factor XI and Factor XII currently under development will be presented and the results of the first published studies will be commented. Finally, potential implications for clinical practice and additional areas of research for these new drugs will be discussed.

Chair:

Tzu-Fei Wang , MD,MPH
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Ottawa,  ON, Canada

Speakers:

Tzu-Fei Wang , MD,MPH
The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa
Ottawa,  ON, Canada
Frequently Asked Questions about Factor Xa Inhibitors

Alex C. Spyropoulos , MD
Northwell
New York,  NY
To Prophylaxis or Not and How Much and How Long: Controversies in the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism for Medical Inpatients

Walter Ageno , MD
University
Varese,  Italy
Coming Soon to a Pharmacy Near You? FXIa Inhibitors and Other Novel Strategies to Prevent or Treat Venous Thromboembolism

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To Transplant or Not to Transplant in Active or High Risk Myeloid Disease


Monday, December 12, 2022, 4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 343-345

Chair:

Coleman Lindsley , MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Daniel J. Weisdorf , MD
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis,  MN
Transplant in Those with High Burden Disease: Refractory AML and High Risk MDS

Charles Craddock
Queen Elizabeth Hospital
Birmingham,  ENG, United Kingdom
Transplant in AML with Measurable Residual Disease: Proceed or Defer?

Coleman Lindsley , MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA
Transplant for TP53-Mutated MDS and AML: Because We Can or Because We Should?

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Updates in Targeted Therapy in Pediatric Leukemia


Monday, December 12, 2022, 2:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 343-345

In this case-based session, Dr Sarah Tasian will review the biology of Philadelphia chromosome-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-like ALL) and current genetic testing approaches to identify patients with this high-risk leukemia subtype. She will then discuss indications for integration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) into the therapy of patients with Ph-like ALL. Finally, she will highlight recently-completed, current, and planned TKI-based clinical trials for children and adolescents/young adults with Ph-like ALL.

Dr. Katherine Tarlock will discuss targeted therapies in children with AML including targeted small molecule inhibitors as well as immunotherapeutic agents.  She will focus on single gene mutations and aberrantly activated oncogenic pathways, and review some of challenges of mutation targeting and drug development in pediatric versus adult AML. She will also discuss the evolution of targeting cell surface antigens with a variety of immunotherapeutic strategies in pediatric AML. This talk will focus on targeted agents currently available and with active clinical trials, and will also touch on those in clinical trial development.

Dr. Rishi Kotecha will highlight the challenges of treating infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This talk will focus on targeted agents that are being primed for clinical use and provide insight into the landscape of clinical trials that are currently in development for infants with ALL. In addition, Dr. Kotecha will review the outcomes from preclinical studies that have investigated novel targeted agents for infants with KMT2A-rearranged ALL and their potential for future clinical translation.   

Dr. Katherine Tarlock will discuss targeted therapies in children with AML including targeted small molecule inhibitors as well as immunotherapeutic agents.  She will focus on single gene mutations and aberrantly activated oncogenic pathways, and review some of challenges of mutation targeting and drug development in pediatric versus adult AML. She will also discuss the evolution of targeting cell surface antigens with a variety of immunotherapeutic strategies in pediatric AML. This talk will focus on targeted agents currently available and with active clinical trials, and will also touch on those in clinical trial development.

Chair:

Sarah K Tasian , MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia,  PA

Speakers:

Sarah K Tasian , MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia,  PA
Clinical Screening for Ph-like ALL and the Developing Role of TKIs

Katherine Tarlock , MD
Seattle Children's Hospital
Seattle,  WA
The Evolution of Targeted Therapy in Pediatric AML: Small Molecule Inhibitors and Immunotherapeutic Strategies

Rishi Sury Kotecha , MB ChB, PhD
Perth Children's Hospital
Perth,  Australia
Updates in Infant Leukemia and the Potential for Targeted Therapy

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Von Willebrand Disease


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 208-210

Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder. It is caused by deficiency or dysfunction of von Willebrand factor (VWF) a multimeric glycoprotein that plays critical roles in the circulation and is characterized by excessive mucocutaneous bleeding. There have been significant recent advances in our understanding of the biology of VWD and also in the attention being paid to the clinical impact of the disease.   This session will highlight ongoing diagnostic challenges and special management situations. It will also present the patient perspective with a view towards future needs and opportunities to improve care. 

During this session, Dr. Lavin will discuss challenges in the diagnosis of VWD, focusing on the most common subtype, type 1 VWD with levels in the 30-50 IU/dL range. She will suggest approaches for a frequent clinical dilemma, those presenting with bleeding symptoms and borderline plasma VWF levels. Age-related increases in plasma VWF levels complicates assessment of type 1 VWD. The resulting impact on diagnosis will be explored in the context of both adolescence and advanced age.

Dr. James will review the clinical scope of gastrointestinal bleeding in von Willebrand disease (VWD) patients, including current challenges in diagnosis and treatment.  The biology of angiodysplasia and predisposition in patients with abnormal von Willebrand factor (VWF) will be discussed as well as therapeutic options for both acute management and longer term treatment of the vascular abnormalities.

Dr. Sholzberg will discuss what we have learned about the patient's experience with VWD, access and barriers to care. She will describe how structural sexism, stigmatization of vaginal bleeding, delayed diagnosis, and lack of timely access to care result in an increased frequency of bleeding events, iron deficiency, anemia, and  decreased quality of life in patients with VWD. She will describe the positive shift in guidelines, and research prioritization that should promote health equity, and advancement of compassionate and patient centered care.

Chair:

Paula D. James , MD,FRCPC
Queen's University
Kingston,  ON, Canada

Speakers:

Michelle Lavin , MD,PhD,FRCPath
Haemostasis Research Lab
Dublin,  Ireland
Diagnostic Pitfalls and Conundrums

Paula D. James , MD,FRCPC
Queen's University
Kingston,  ON, Canada
Special Considerations in GI Bleeding

Michelle Sholzberg , MD
[email protected]
Toronto,  ON, Canada
What Have We Learned About the Patient's Experience with von Willebrand Disease?

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Health Equity Studio

Defining Inequity and Root Causes of Health Inequities


Saturday, December 10, 2022
9:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio
Sunday, December 11, 2022
12: 30 p.m. - 12: 59 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio

As part of our commitment to promoting and nurturing a diverse and inclusive hematology community, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) is offering the ASH Health Equity Studio, located in ASH Central.  This brave space is designed to help attendees recognize inequities in health care and provide tools to make change in their institutions.  Plan to attend these sessions to learn more about the root causes of health inequities, strategies to overcome disparities in patient care and career development, and ways to improve diversity and inclusion in hematology.  These sessions will include a short expert commentary followed by facilitated conversations about actions that can be taken to address health inequities at your institution back to top

Overcoming Disparities in Career Development


Sunday, December 11, 2022
9:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio
Monday, December 12, 2022
1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio

As part of our commitment to promoting and nurturing a diverse and inclusive hematology community, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) is offering the ASH Health Equity Studio, located in ASH Central.  This brave space is designed to help attendees recognize inequities in health care and provide tools to make change in their institutions.  Plan to attend these sessions to learn more about the root causes of health inequities, strategies to overcome disparities in patient care and career development, and ways to improve diversity and inclusion in hematology.  These sessions will include a short expert commentary followed by facilitated conversations about actions that can be taken to address health inequities at your institution. back to top

Overcoming Lack of Diversity in Clinical Trials


Saturday, December 10, 2022
11: 15 a.m. - 11: 45 a.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio
Sunday, December 11, 2022
4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio

As part of our commitment to promoting and nurturing a diverse and inclusive hematology community, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) is offering the ASH Health Equity Studio, located in ASH Central.  This brave space is designed to help attendees recognize inequities in health care and provide tools to make change in their institutions.  Plan to attend these sessions to learn more about the root causes of health inequities, strategies to overcome disparities in patient care and career development, and ways to improve diversity and inclusion in hematology.  These sessions will include a short expert commentary followed by facilitated conversations about actions that can be taken to address health inequities at your institution back to top

Recognizing and Addressing Implicit Bias


Saturday, December 10, 2022
3:30 p.m. - 3:59 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio
Monday, December 12, 2022
12: 15 p.m. - 12: 45 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio

As part of our commitment to promoting and nurturing a diverse and inclusive hematology community, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) is offering the ASH Health Equity Studio, located in ASH Central.  This brave space is designed to help attendees recognize inequities in health care and provide tools to make change in their institutions.  Plan to attend these sessions to learn more about the root causes of health inequities, strategies to overcome disparities in patient care and career development, and ways to improve diversity and inclusion in hematology.  These sessions will include a short expert commentary followed by facilitated conversations about actions that can be taken to address health inequities at your institution. back to top

Strategies to Improve Diversity and Inclusion in Healthcare and Industry


Sunday, December 11, 2022
11: 15 a.m. - 11: 45 a.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio
Monday, December 12, 2022
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio

As part of our commitment to promoting and nurturing a diverse and inclusive hematology community, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) is offering the ASH Health Equity Studio, located in ASH Central.  This brave space is designed to help attendees recognize inequities in health care and provide tools to make change in their institutions.  Plan to attend these sessions to learn more about the root causes of health inequities, strategies to overcome disparities in patient care and career development, and ways to improve diversity and inclusion in hematology.  These sessions will include a short expert commentary followed by facilitated conversations about actions that can be taken to address health inequities at your institution. back to top

Strategies to Overcome Healthcare Disparities


Saturday, December 10, 2022
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio
Monday, December 12, 2022
10: 00 a.m. - 10: 30 a.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall F - ASH Health Equity Studio

As part of our commitment to promoting and nurturing a diverse and inclusive hematology community, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) is offering the ASH Health Equity Studio, located in ASH Central.  This brave space is designed to help attendees recognize inequities in health care and provide tools to make change in their institutions.  Plan to attend these sessions to learn more about the root causes of health inequities, strategies to overcome disparities in patient care and career development, and ways to improve diversity and inclusion in hematology.  These sessions will include a short expert commentary followed by facilitated conversations about actions that can be taken to address health inequities at your institution. back to top

Scientific Program

Aplastic Anemia, Dysimmunity and Mutant Clones


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 9:30 a.m. - 10: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 288-290

Bone marrow failure (BMF) in aplastic anemia (AA) is due to loss of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which in turn, is caused by deranged immunity and inflammation. Somatic mutations in Hla or Piga genes can lead to immune escape, while other clones involving a range of myeloid cancer genes can also emerge, presumably due to a combination of genetic drift and selection. This session will highlight recent cutting-edge research deciphering pathways by which dysimmunity, HSCs defect, and mutant clones can dynamically shape the course of the disease, spontaneously or in response to both immuno-suppressive and eltrombopag therapy. 

 

Dr. Neal Young will show that our understanding of the immune pathophysiology of marrow failure has been deepened by new technologies—single cell ‘omics; new diseases—VEXAS; and new theories—evolutionary biology applied to somatically mutated clones. Sequencing of RNA of single cells combined with time-of-flight cytometry has allowed deep examination of aplastic anemia marrow cells pre- and post-therapy. Somatically mutated hematopoietic targets evade immune attack and survive regenerative stress, and in effector lymphocytes, propagate pathophysiologic immunity. In VEXAS, acquired mutations in a ubiquitylation gene cause hyperinflammatory rheumatologic diseases, and immune activation originates to the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Modern Darwinian principles have yet to be fully applied to “benign” diseases arising in hematopoietic cells and across a wide range of human tissues. 

 

Dr. Daria Babushok will describe the characteristics of clonal hematopoiesis in aplastic anemia, focusing on frequent somatic mutations in Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I genes. Dr. Babushok will discuss the genetic mechanisms of HLA Class I loss, and the disproportionate frequency of mutations targeting specific HLA-A and B alleles linked to aplastic anemia pathogenesis. She will review the role and relative pathogenicity of HLA Class I alleles in predisposing to aplastic anemia and will also examine the impact of high pathogenicity alleles on clinical outcomes of aplastic anemia patients. 

 

Dr. Austin Kulasekararaj will describe the current understanding and knowledge about somatic mutations in acquired aplastic anemia. Besides discussing the dynamics of clonal hematopoiesis during the disease course and its impact with both immunosuppressive therapy and eltrombopag, Dr. Kulasekararaj will review the mechanisms of oligoclonal hematopoiesis and their impact on response to treatment. Lastly, He will examine the impact of eltrombopag (both in treatment naïve and relapsed/refractory aplastic anemia) in high-risk clonal evolution and malignant transformation to Myelodysplastic syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Chair:

Jean Soulier , MD, PhD
Hôpital Saint-Louis and University Paris-Cité
Paris,  France

Speakers:

Neal S. Young , MD
National Institute of Health
Bethesda,  MD
Immune Deregulation in Aplastic Anemia

Daria V. Babushok , MD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
HLA-restricted Attack and Clonal Evolution in Aplastic Anemia

Austin Kulasekararaj , MD,MBBS,FRCPath,MRCP
King's College Hospital
London,  ENG, United Kingdom
New Biological Insights on Clonal Evolution in the Eltrombopag Era

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Childhood Red Cell Disorders: Embracing Technology to Improve How We Manage Challenging Anemias


Monday, December 12, 2022, 10: 30 a.m. - 11: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 343-345

Anemia is the most common hematologic disorder in children worldwide. For many children, anemia is not only a cause of short-term ill-health, it also has a lifelong impact. This session will describe how a range of state-of-the-art technologies are being developed and applied to address challenging questions about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of anemia in children. It will also illustrate how these technologies can be used to deliver practical advances in the management of childhood anemia and show that these benefits can be achieved way beyond the labs where they were first developed including resource-poor settings.   

Dr. Deena Iskander will demonstrate the utility of single cell studies in understanding normal human erythropoiesis and its dysregulation in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). She will describe the clinical heterogeneity of this disease and how single cell RNA sequencing has helped to identify new genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to disease heterogeneity. Finally, Dr. Iskander will discuss putative mechanisms of erythroid failure revealed by these studies and in turn, potential new therapeutic avenues in DBA.

Dr. Wilbur Lam will discuss new point-of-care and patient-facing technologies to screen for and monitor anemia. He will specifically describe a visual, color-based anemia test that requires a single drop of capillary blood as well as an entirely non-invasive smartphone app that can estimate blood hemoglobin levels with a "fingernail selfie" and how these two complementary technologies can be used synergistically. Dr. Lam will also discuss the accuracy of these technologies and how improvements are being implemented. Lastly, he will discuss the various clinical use cases of these anemia detection technologies for children and adolescents.

Dr. Obiageli Nnodu will describe the strategy and progress in delivering novel therapies in sickle cell disease in Africa.  She will focus on advanced therapies that include exchange blood transfusion, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and Gene Therapy. The  strategies she will present highlight the importance of an integrated approach that includes optimizing healthcare, advocacy, research, and training with partnerships at different levels. The goal of this work is to facilitate access of SCD populations in Africa to advanced therapies and participation of healthcare providers, policy makers, educators and researchers from Africa to deliver disease-modifying and curative therapies.

Chair:

Irene Roberts , MD
Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine
Oxford,  ENG, United Kingdom

Speakers:

Deena Iskander , MD, PhD
Imperial College London
London,  ENG, United Kingdom
Dissecting Heterogeneity in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia: Insight from Single Cell Studies and Clinical Findings

Wilbur A Lam , MD, PhD
Emory University and Georgia Tech Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Decatur,  GA
New Technologies for Assessment of Anemia and Other Hematologic Disorders in Resource Limited Settings

Obiageli E Nnodu , BMBCH, FWACP (LabMed), FNAMed.
University of Abuja
Abuja,  Nigeria
Managing Severe Sickle Cell Disease- How Can We Deliver Novel Therapies in Resource-Poor Settings?

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JOINT Session - Seed and Soil: The Role of Inflammation in Myeloid Malignancies


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:35 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , R02-R05

Inflammatory signaling is increasingly recognized as a major contributor to human disease, including cancer. The “seed and soil” concept of carcinogenesis underscores our interest in both the cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic roles of inflammation in the pathogenesis of myeloid neoplasia. This session will cover dysregulated inflammatory signaling in hematopoietic cells along with the contribution of the microenvironment and will highlight therapeutic implications arising from these newly generated insights. 

 

Dr. Katherine King will discuss evidence that inflammatory signaling contributes to clonal hematopoiesis. She will discuss the current mechanistic understanding of this relationship with a focus on?Dnmt3a?and?Tet2-mutant clones. 

 

Dr. Christina Lo Celso will discuss the contribution of the bone marrow microenvironment to leukemogenesis. Her work has explored the role of extracellular matrix remodeling in regulating Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) growth and differentiation, the highly dynamic interactions between AML cells and immune cells, and the impact of infection on the bone marrow microenvironment. Dr. Lo Celso will describe tools developed to capture the complexity of these interactions in the bone marrow microenvironment and discuss our evolving understanding of the dynamics taking place in the bone marrow of healthy humans as they age and as leukemia develops. 

 

Dr. Eric Pietras will discuss the role of dysregulated inflammatory signaling in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Specifically, his talk will focus on the interplay between inflammation and metabolic dysregulation as potential drivers of selection and expansion of mutant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells at early stages of myeloid oncogenesis. 

 

Dr. Daniel Starczynowski will describe the role of dysregulated innate immune pathways in pre-leukemic and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) hematopoietic cells. He will also discuss the implications of systemic inflammation on the pathogenesis of MDS and on the competitive advantage of MDS cells. Lastly, Dr. Starczynowski will describe emerging therapeutic strategies targeting innate immune and inflammatory pathways in myeloid malignancies.

Chair:

Kimberly Stegmaier , MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Katherine Y. King , MD, PhD
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston,  TX
Inflammatory Signaling and Clonal Hematopoiesis

Cristina Lo Celso , PhD
Sir Francis Crick Institute
London,  United Kingdom
Contribution of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment to Leukemogenesis

Eric M Pietras , PhD
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Aurora,  CO
Dysregulated Inflammatory Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Myeloid Malignancies

Daniel T. Starczynowski , PhD
Cincinnati Children's Hospital
Cincinnati,  OH
Therapeutic Implications of Inflammatory Signaling in Myeloid Malignancies

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JOINT Session - The Lymphoma Microenvironment and Its Impact on Therapy


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 9:30 a.m. - 11: 05 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , R02-R05

Lymphoma B-cells exist within a complex milieu of immune and stromal cells that play a central role in lymphoma etiology direct cell-cell contact and/or the release of soluble factors. Inter-patient heterogeneity in lymphoma microenvironment characteristics have been linked with divergent outcomes following chemoimmunotherapy and are likely to be major determinants of response or resistance to modern immunotherapeutic approaches such as cell therapy and T-cell engagers. This session will highlight recent advances in the characterization of the lymphoma microenvironment and its association with therapeutic failure, with a focus on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. 

Dr. Maher Gandhi will highlight recent advances in spatial imaging and single cell genomics that have provided new insights into how non-cancerous cells behave and interact within histologically distinct lymphoma subtypes. Lymphoma is a cancer of the immune system, in which malignant lymphoid cells co-exist within a sophisticated microenvironmental niche. Manipulating the environment to provide novel targeted therapeutics remains an unmet need.

Dr. Leandro Cerchietti will describe the distinct phenotypes of cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in patients with B- and T-cell lymphomas. He will describe how these populations that include inflammatory and myofibroblastic CAFs are transcriptionally and epigenetically reprogrammed into cancer supporting entities. He will also describe the roles of CAFs throughout the course of disease, their unique role in older lymphoma patients, and potential therapeutic vulnerabilities that can be targeted for lymphoma immunotherapy. 

Dr. Frederick Locke will discuss how evidence from lymphoma patient samples collected on CAR-T cell clinical trials, and from patients treated with standard of care CAR-T, paint a picture of the lymphoma tumor mechanisms of resistance to CAR-T. He will describe the impact of tumor associated inflammatory signals and suppressive myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment and periphery. Dr. Locke will also outline how the pretreatment immune contexture impacts efficacy, and the association between lymphoma cell genomic complexity and response to CAR-T therapy. 

Dr. Saad Kenderian will describe the impact of different components of the tumor microenvironment on outcomes of cellular immunotherapy for lymphoma. He will discuss how changes in cytokines, inhibitory myeloid cells, cancer associated fibroblasts, and extracellular vesicles interact with CAR-T cells and induce both toxicity and resistance to therapy. Lastly, he will review current efforts to modulate the tumor microenvironment in order to increase CAR-T cell safety and efficacy.

Chair:

Michael R. Green , PhD
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX

Kelli MacDonald , PhD
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute
Brisbane,  QLD, Australia

Speakers:

Maher K. Gandhi , PhD,FRACP,FRCPath
Mater Research, University of Queensland
Brisbane,  QLD, Australia
Ecotypes in Lymphoma

Leandro Cerchietti , MD
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York,  NY
Stromal Cells in Lymphoma

Frederick L. Locke , MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa,  FL
Mapping Effects of the Tumour Microenvironment on CAR T Responses in NHL

Saad S. Kenderian , MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Cellular and Cytokine Modulation of the Tumour Microenvironment

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JOINT Session: New Tools to Optimize Platelet Transfusion Therapy


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:35 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 252-254

Historically, the major consideration in platelet transfusion therapy was in obtaining the maximal platelet count. However, recent clinical and basic science studies focusing on both transfused and native platelets have increased our understanding of how to obtain the maximum benefit when transfusing platelets and led us to the conclusion that more isn’t always better. This session will highlight some of these recent advances that have great potential to improve clinical management of platelet transfusion therapy. 

 

Dr. Marie Hollenhorst will describe the glycosylation of platelet glycoprotein Iba (GPIba), which plays important roles in hemostasis, platelet clearance, and the anti-platelet immune response. Dr. Hollenhorst will discuss her comprehensive analysis of GPIba glycosylation, which has resulted in a detailed map of glycosites (amino acid sites of glycosylation) and determination of glycan structures at each glycosite. Physiologic implications of GPIba glycans include ABO blood group (ABH) antigen-containing glycans, sialoglycans, Tn antigen, and T antigen. 

 

Dr. Dianne van der Wal will present the various platelet clearance mechanisms currently described in humans and in animal models. She will discuss the role of GPIb and platelet-attached carbohydrates in physiological clearance and (bleeding) disorders including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Dr van der Wal will discuss her latest findings on the effect of various donor attributes on the quality of platelet components and implications for platelet clearance and hemostatic efficiency post-transfusion. She will also discuss novel in vitro clearance pathways for platelet microparticles and the potential implications for patients, post-transfusion. 

 

Dr. Martin Schreiber will discuss the effects of leukoreduction and the storage lesion on platelet function in whole blood. He will also discuss the benefits of cold platelet transfusion. Finally, Dr. Schreiber will discuss potential alternative therapies including freeze dried platelets and platelet extracellular vesicles. 

 

Dr. Martha Sola-Visner will discuss the incidence and patterns of bleeding in preterm neonates, and the results from randomized trials of platelet transfusion thresholds in this population. She will then describe the developmental differences that exist between neonates and adults in platelet function and primary hemostasis, and the potential “developmental mismatch” that occurs when adult platelets are transfused into sick neonates. Lastly, she will discuss the effects of platelet transfusions on neonatal hemostasis and inflammation, and the potential mechanisms underlying the increased morbidity and mortality associated with platelet transfusions in this vulnerable population.

Chair:

Maureane Hoffman , MD, PhD
Durham VA Medical Center
Durham,  NC

Speakers:

Marie Alice Hollenhorst , MD,PhD
Stanford University
Palo Alto,  CA
Glycan Regulation of Immune and Hemostasis Function in Platelet Biology and Transfusion Speakers

Dianne Evertdina van der Wal , PhD
The Australian Red Cross Lifeblood
Alexandria/Sydney,  Australia
Platelet Clearance by Direct and Indirect Mechanisms: Implications for Platelet Transfusion and Treatment of Different Pathologic Conditions Speakers

Martin Schreiber , MD
Oregon Health and Science University
Portland,  OR
Platelets in Whole Blood Transfusion, Cold Stored Platelets

Martha Sola-Visner , MD
Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School
Boston,  MA
Platelet Transfusion Outcomes in the Preterm Infant – The intersection Between Hemostatic Efficacy and Immune/Inflammatory Modulation of Platelets

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Plasma Cell Dyscrasias: Resistance to Immunotherapy: Mechanisms and Monitoring


Monday, December 12, 2022, 10: 30 a.m. - 11: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , New Orleans Theater AB

In the last couple of decades we have witnessed tremendous progress in the therapeutics of multiple myeloma. The advent of proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, CD38 directed monoclonal antibodies and more recently B-Cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) directed therapies have altered the treatment landscape for the disease. However, the malignant cells in this disease do nearly always ultimately develop resistance to the therapeutic modalities and the disease progresses. Understanding mechanisms of resistance to these therapies is therefore vital to improving patient outcomes. 

 

Dr. Flavia Pichiorri will focus on mechanisms of Daratumumab and BCMA therapy resistance which will include an overview of the literature in the field and published and unpublished data produced in her laboratory. 

 

Dr. Sarah Gooding will discuss the challenges of the development of resistance to immunomodulatory drugs (IMiD®) in the long-term management of patients with myeloma. ?She will discuss the mechanisms by which resistance may arise; this may be due to the selection of drug resistant subclones during therapy exposure, or changes in the bone marrow and immune microenvironment. The Cereblon drug binding protein may be lost due to a range of mechanisms. Dr. Gooding will discuss whether we may be able to move towards better targeting of IMiD drugs by implementing resistance marker tracking into the clinic. 

 

Dr. Jens Lohr will discuss conceptual advantages of cell-free DNA over disease markers that are currently used in clinical routine care, the benefits and limitations of adding cell-free DNA interrogation to the currently available parameters of response, its value for disease assessment and as a tool to refine clinical decision-making. Liquid biopsy approaches with cell-free DNA interrogation are powerful tools to obtain information about multiple myeloma without the need for invasive bone marrow biopsy.

Chair:

Ravi Vij , MD, MBBS
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis,  MO

Speakers:

Flavia Pichiorri , PhD
City of Hope
Duarte,  CA
Resistance to CD38 and BCMA Targeted Therapies

Sarah Gooding , MD, PhD
University of Oxford
Oxford,  United Kingdom
Resistance to Immunomodulatory Drugs

Jens G. Lohr , MD, PhD
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA
Cell Free DNA Analysis

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Scientific Symposia

Genetic and Functional Heterogeneity in Megakaryocytes and Platelets


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 252-254

Platelets have important roles in not only hemostasis but also other key biological and pathological processes such as immunoregulation, malignancy, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Historically, megakaryocytes have been considered a phenotypically homogenous population that produce a uniform population of platelets. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm and created a fundamental shift in how we view both megakaryocytes and their platelet progeny. This session will focus on heterogeneity in the development and function of platelets and their precursor cells, megakaryocytes.

Dr. Krause will present cell and molecular insights into the fate specification of primary human megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitors (MEP). While much is known about how megakaryoblasts and erythroblasts progress to maturation, the signaling, transcriptomic, and epigenetic changes that occur during MEP fate specification are still largely unknown. Dr. Krause will present data revealing roles for differential transcription, epigenetics and the cell cycle in MEP fate specification based on functional assays and high throughput molecular approaches as well as recently published timelapse microscopy studies.

Dr. Alastair Poole will present evidence showing emergence of megakaryocytes into vasculature including an in vitro heart-lung system that has been developed to allow perfusion of megakaryocytes through the pulmonary vasculature. High efficiency of in vitro platelet generation in lung vasculature is shown and demonstration that in vitro microfluidic chambers mimic this vasculature, enabling large scale functional platelet generation in vitro.

Dr. Anandi Krishnan will discuss how platelet transcriptomic signatures not only capture information from parent megakaryocytes and progenitor hematopoietic stem cells but also underlying disease states. In cancer, substantive body of research in patients with solid tumors have identified distinct signatures in ‘tumor educated platelets’, reflecting influences of the tumor, stroma and vasculature on splicing, sequestration of tumor-derived RNAs and potentially cytokine and microvesicle influences on megakaryocytes. Dr. Krishnan’s lab has identified platelet RNA expression as a highly sensitive approach to profiling chronic progressive hematologic malignancies, where the combination of large data cohorts and machine-learning algorithms enable precise feature selection and potential prognostication. This talk will also highlight actionable steps required toward advancing the utility of the platelet transcriptome as a highly sensitive biomarker in cancer and emphasize the immense opportunities for personalized medicine.

Chair:

Kellie R. Machlus , PhD
Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Diane S. Krause
Yale University
New Haven,  CT
Differentiation of Bipotent Progenitors to the Megakaryocytic versus Erythroid Lineages

Alastair W. Poole , Vet.MB, MA, PhD
School of Medical Sciences
Bristol,  United Kingdom
Highly Efficient In Vitro Platelet Generation in Lung Vasculature Reproduced by Microfluidics

Anandi Krishnan , PhD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Palo Alto,  CA
Genetic Heterogeneity in Platelets - Towards Personalized Medicine

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Special-Interest Sessions

ASH and the ASH Research Collaborative: Advancing Progress in Sickle Cell Disease Update and Reception


Monday, December 12, 2022, 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Marriott New Orleans Warehouse Arts District , Gravier DEF

All meeting attendees interested in sickle cell disease are invited to attend the ASH and the ASH Research Collaborative: Advancing Progress in Sickle Cell Disease Update and Reception. In 2015, ASH launched a transformative, multi-faceted, patient-centric initiative to improve outcomes for individuals living with sickle cell disease (SCD). ASH’s multifaceted SCD efforts are focused on: ? 

  • Convening multidisciplinary partners and collaborators 
  • Promoting access to high quality care 
  • Global issues 
  • Policy and advocacy 
  • Research 
  • Leveraging data

Please join us for an evening of networking and to learn about the ASH and ASH Research Collaborative SCD programs and how to be a part of this nationwide and global initiative. back to top

ASH Guidelines on AML in Older Adults: Monitoring Emerging Evidence


Monday, December 12, 2022, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 295-296

During this special education session, presenters will discuss ASH guidelines, which are developed by leading clinical, methodological, and patient experts through a rigorous process to review evidence and write actionable recommendations. 

Chair:

Mikkael A. Sekeres , MD
University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Miami,  FL

Speakers:

Laura C. Michaelis , MD
The Medical College of Wisconsin Inc.
Milwaukee,  WI
Monitoring and Updating of the ASH AML Guidelines

Mark R. Litzow , MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Updates on Induction Therapy for Older Adults with AML

Kristen Marie O'Dwyer , MD
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester,  NY
Updates on Post-Remission Therapy for Older Adults with AML

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ASH Guidelines on VWD: Impact on Patients, Policy, and Allied Health Professionals


Monday, December 12, 2022, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 265-268

During this special education session, presenters will discuss ASH guidelines, which are developed by leading clinical, methodological, and patient experts through a rigorous process to review evidence and write actionable recommendations. 

Chair:

Nathan T. Connell , MD,MPH
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Jean M. Grow
Marquette University
Milwaukee,  WI
Impact of the VWD Guidelines on Patients

Leonard A. Valentino , MD
National Hemophilia Foundation
New York,  NY
Impact of the VWD Guidelines on the Legislative and Policy Agendas

Penni Smith , BSN
Primary Children's Hospital
Salt Lake City,  UT
Impact of the VWD Guidelines on Allied Health Professionals

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ASH Health Equity Rounds Lunch


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 11: 30 a.m. - 12: 30 p.m.
Marriott New Orleans Warehouse Arts District , Cypress

Health Equity Rounds are interactive, case-based discussions with an interdisciplinary panel to include hematologists, health equity/public health experts, patients, and patient advocates to discuss health equity issues within hematology. Lunch will be provided to in-person attendees.

Speakers:

Angela C. Weyand , MD
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor,  MI
Gender Disparities in Bleeding Disorders

Jacquelyn Powers
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Gender Disparities in Bleeding Disorders

Paula D. James , MD,FRCPC
Queen's University
Kingston,  ON, Canada
Gender Disparities in Bleeding Disorders

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Building a Nationwide Sickle Cell Disease Data Hub and Learning Community


Monday, December 12, 2022, 2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 217-219

Chair:

Alexis A. Thompson , MD, MPH
Northwestern University
Chicago,  IL

Speakers:

Alexis A. Thompson , MD, MPH
Northwestern University
Chicago,  IL
The Role of a Nationwide SCD Data Hub and Learning Community

Carole Lannon
Cincinnati Children's
Cincinnati,  OH
Designing a Nationwide Learning Community

Amanda M. Brandow , DO, MS
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee,  WI
Better Quality Through Better Measurement

Venee N. Tubman , MD
Texas Children's Hospital
Houston,  TX
Building Your Team to Drive Improvement

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Disability Community Networking Breakfast


Monday, December 12, 2022, 7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Marriott New Orleans Warehouse Arts District , Gravier AB

This breakfast is an informal community-building and networking event for members of the disability community attending the meeting. The event is hosted by the ASH Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Programs Subcommittee and aims to create a sense of belonging and allyship and, where possible, identify opportunities to learn more about the experiences and needs of the community to allow us to have a greater impact in our DEI efforts. back to top

Grassroots Network Lunch


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 11: 15 a.m. - 12: 15 p.m.
Hilton New Orleans Riverside , St. James Ballroom

Thanks to ASH’s advocacy efforts and the ASH Grassroots Network, issues important to the future of hematology have been brought to the attention of the U.S. Congress and federal agencies. The ASH Grassroots Network Lunch provides a forum for interested members to learn how they can participate in ASH’s advocacy efforts, communicate with Congress, become effective advocates for hematology, and discuss the Society’s legislative and regulatory priorities. An overview of the Society’s 2022 advocacy accomplishments and a preview of the Society’s 2023 advocacy agenda, as well as a discussion about the potential impact of the 2022 midterm elections on policy related to hematology, will also be provided.

Chair:

Jennifer Holter Chakrabarty , MD
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Oklahoma City,  OK

Speaker:

Veronica Gillispie-Bell , MD
Ochsner Health System
Kenner,  LA
The Intersection of Hematology and Gynecology and How to Get Involved

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LGBTQIA+ Community Networking Brunch


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 11: 15 a.m. - 12: 15 p.m.
Marriott New Orleans Warehouse Arts District , Gravier AB

This brunch is an informal community-building and networking event for members of the LGBTQIA+ community attending the meeting. The event is hosted by the ASH Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Programs Subcommittee and aims to create a sense of belonging and allyship and, where possible, identify opportunities to learn more about the experiences and needs of the community to allow us to have a greater impact in our DEI efforts. back to top

Maternal Health in Hematology - Current Resources and Future Advocacy


Monday, December 12, 2022, 10: 30 a.m. - 12: 00 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , Hall E

Maternal?morbidity and?mortality?closely intersects with hematology. In 2021, ASH indicated that?the time is right—given greater?awareness,?as well as?attention?to?health disparities and?their?intersection with?diversity, equity,?and inclusion?(DEI)—to explore opportunities?for the Society to engage?in?these?important public health?issues?more fully. The session will cover the current efforts, programs and resources (including but not limited to guidelines), as well as present upcoming plans and opportunities for engagement by hematology community.? Additionally, this session will also touch on the current political climate around the right to maternal healthcare and well-being and ways to be an effective advocate. The session will include case studies highlighting ways to bring attention to hematology and maternal health research and practice issues impacted by public policy decisions.??? 

 

Part I - A Review of ASH Resources 

  1. Maternal Health in Hematology at ASH    

  

Part II – Ways to be an Effective Advocate   

  1. Amicus Brief: a Michigan Study   
  1. Op-ed: a Washington Post Study   
  1. Grassroots Advoacay: a Tennessee Study 

Speakers:

Jerome Dallas Winegarden III , MD
Trinity Health Ann Arbor Hospital
Ann Arbor,  MI
Amicus Brief: a Michigan Study

Mikkael A. Sekeres , MD
University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Miami,  FL
Op-ed: a Washington Post Study

Deva Sharma , MD, MS
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville,  TN
Grassroots Advocacy: a Tennessee Study

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Promoting Minorities in Hematology Oral Presentations Jefferson Ballroom - Classical Hematology


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Hilton New Orleans Riverside , Jefferson Ballroom

ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to this event, which will showcase training and research opportunities geared toward increasing the diversity of scholars in the field of hematology. The highlight of the session will be scientific presentations from the ASH Minority Medical Student Award, the ASH Minority Resident Hematology Award, the ASH Minority Hematology Graduate Award, and the ASH Minority Hematology Fellowship Award program participants. A reception will follow the presentations.

Speakers:

Atinuke Dosunmu-Ogunbi
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh,  PA
The Role of Superoxide Dismutase 2 in Sickle Cell Disease

Elshafa H. Ahmed , DVM, PhD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Characterization of Epstein-Barr Virus Genome Diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa

Halimat Shadia Olaniyan , BS
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Covington,  KY
Point of Care Evaluation of Rapid Testing Technologies in the Diagnosis of Sickle Cell Disease

Jasmin Martin , MD
American University of Antigua
Osbourn,  Antigua and Barbuda
Specific Membrane Lipid Levels Correlate with the Degree of Sickling in Mouse Models

Miriam Osei , MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Understanding Risk of Hematologic Malignancy in Hereditary Hemolytic Anemias and Hemoglobinopathies, a Multi-Institutional Matched Case-Control Study

Natasha Stanley
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Philadelphia,  PA
Sars-Cov-2 Vaccination Safety in Patients with Acquired Aplastic Anemia

Tolulope Ifabiyi , MD
Case Western Reserve Hospital
Cuyahoga Falls, 
Evaluation of Biomarkers for Endothelial Activation and Hemolysis in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

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Promoting Minorities in Hematology Oral Presentations St. Charles Ballroom - Malignant Hematology


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Hilton New Orleans Riverside , St. Charles Ballroom

ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to this event, which will showcase training and research opportunities geared toward increasing the diversity of scholars in the field of hematology. The highlight of the session will be scientific presentations from the ASH Minority Medical Student Award, the ASH Minority Resident Hematology Award, the ASH Minority Hematology Graduate Award, and the ASH Minority Hematology Fellowship Award program participants. A reception will follow the presentations.

Speakers:

Amissa Sei
Morehouse School of Medicine
Atlanta,  GA
Increasing Transduction Efficiency through Expansion of Stem Cells Via Nicotinamide (NAM)

Emmanuel Dwomoh
Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine
North Haven,  CT
Impact of Tacrolimus on CD19+ CAR T Cell Therapy

Florisela Herrejon Chavez , BS
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York,  NY
The RNA Binding Protein Syncrip Is Required for Leukemia Stem Cell Self-Renewal

Jennifer Jane Gile , MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Hypomagnesemia in Untreated Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

Jonathan Legier , BS
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - New Orleans
New Orleans,  LA
Phenotyping Multi-Cytokine Backpack Manufactured CAR T Cells with a 4-1BB Costimulatory Domain

Joshua J. Lara , BS
Texas Tech University Health Science Center El Paso
El Paso,  TX
19S Proteasome Subunits As Oncogenes and Prognostic Biomarkers in FLT3-Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Lynda Villagomez , MD
The Ohio State University and Nationwide Children's Hospital
Columbus,  OH
Constitutive PRMT5 Expression Drives Spontaneous Lymphoblastic Lymphoma In Vivo

Naima Hashi , MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Efficacy of Donor Lymphocyte Infusions in Achieving Disease Control in Myeloid Malignancies Treated with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Ruth Wangondu , MD,PhD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
The Role of Ikaros (IKZF1) Alterations in B-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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Promoting Minorities in Hematology Oral Presentations St. James Ballroom - Outcomes/Health Services


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Hilton New Orleans Riverside , St. James Ballroom

ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to this event, which will showcase training and research opportunities geared toward increasing the diversity of scholars in the field of hematology. The highlight of the session will be scientific presentations from the ASH Minority Medical Student Award, the ASH Minority Resident Hematology Award, the ASH Minority Hematology Graduate Award, and the ASH Minority Hematology Fellowship Award program participants. A reception will follow the presentations.

Speakers:

Alexandra Boye-Doe
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill,  NC
Remote Assessments of Transition-Readiness in Adolescents and Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

Allison Taylor , MD,MS
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham, 
Facilitators and Barriers to Care Encountered during Treatment in Non-Hispanic Black Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Amanda J Llaneza , MPH
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Oklahoma City,  OK
Addressing Epidemiologic Gaps in Immune Thrombocytopenia: Pregnant & Minority Patients

Carolina Velez-Mejia , MD
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio,  TX
Evaluating Survival Outcomes and Socioeconomic Disparities of Hispanics Vs Non-Hispanics for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas in United States: Understanding the Impact of Health Insurance Status

Christopher Mwaniki Wanjiku
Duke University Hospital
Durham,  NC
Prevalence of Impairment in Activities of Daily Living in Adults with Sickle Cell Disease and Its Association with Disease Complications

Gabriel Roman Souza , MD
University of Texas Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center
San Antonio,  TX
Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Veterans with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treated with Venetoclax Plus Hypomethylating Agents: A National Retrospective Cohort Study

Jeffrey G Edwards , MD MPH
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Socioeconomic Disparities and Risk of Stroke As Assessed By Transcranial Doppler: A Displace Study Secondary Analysis

Nicholas W Wilson
Morehouse School of Medicine
Atlanta,  GA
Causes of Death in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease from a Large Population-Based Cohort

Sarah Addison , BS
Ohio State College of Medicine
Columbus, 
Disparities in the Care of Rurally Based Older Adults with Cancer

Sierra Atwater
Duke University
Durham,  NC
Risk Factors for C. Diff Diagnoses in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Suzy Bangudi
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Primary Care Provider Use and Depression Screening Among Transitioning Adolescents and Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease 

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Promoting Minorities in Hematology Reception


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Hilton New Orleans Riverside , The District Foyer

ASH invites all interested meeting attendees to attend the Promoting Minorites in Hematology reception following oral presentations by award recipients of the ASH Minority Recruitment Initiative (MRI) Awards Pathway. back to top

Special Interest Session on Sickle Cell Disease Centers: Ensuring Appropriate Care Across the Patient Lifespan


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , La Nouvelle Orleans Ballroom AB

Chair:

Sophie M. Lanzkron , MD
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Baltimore,  MD

Speakers:

Farzana Sayani , MD
Perelman School of Medicine , University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia,  PA
Challenges and Opportunities in Developing a Sickle Cell Program for Adults at Upenn

Sana Saif Ur Rehman , MD
Washington University School of Medicine
Saint Louis,  MO
Consensus Recommendations on Health Maintenance for Adults with SCD

Monica L. Hulbert , MD
Washington University School of Medicine
Saint Louis,  MO
Elements Needed for Comprehensive Pediatric Care

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Special Symposium on Quality: Quality Improvement Education and Training


Saturday, December 10, 2022, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 295-296

During this special education session, presenters will discuss ASH guidelines, which are developed by leading clinical, methodological, and patient experts through a rigorous process to review evidence and write actionable recommendations.

Chair:

Michael Keng , MD
UVA Health
Charlottesville,  VA

Speakers:

Jose Azar , MD
Indiana University Simon Cancer Center
Indianapolis,  IN
Realizing the Hippocratic Oath with Quality Improvement

Ashley E. Rosko , MD
The Ohio State University
Columbus,  OH
Quality Improvement Project, Implementing Age-Friendly practices in Older Adults with Hematologic Malignancies

Rachael F. Grace , MD
Children's Hospital Boston
Boston,  MA
Quality Improvement Project, Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP)

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Systems-Based Hematology Education and Networking Session


Sunday, December 11, 2022, 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , 252-254

The first hour focuses on Systems-Based approaches and Systems-Level interventions in hematologic care. The second hour transitions to networking amongst peers with drinks and hors d'oeuvres.

Chair:

Marc Stuart Zumberg , MD
University of Florida
Gainesville,  Gainesville, FL

Speakers:

Marc Stuart Zumberg , MD
University of Florida
Gainesville,  FL
Introduction to Systems-Based Hematology

MIchael B. Streiff , MD
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Baltimore,  MD
A Systems-Based Approach to the Prevention and Management of Cancer-Associated Thrombosis

Annette S. Kim , MD,PhD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Avoiding Overuse of Molecular/Genetic Testing Via Systems-Level Interventions

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Training Program Directors' Workshop


Friday, December 9, 2022, 9:00 a.m. - 12: 00 p.m.
Marriott New Orleans Warehouse Arts District , Cypress

The Training Program Directors Workshop is held each year before the ASH annual meeting and is designed for training program directors, associate program directors, and others involved with hematology training to share lessons learned, best practices, and explore opportunities to improve their leadership skills. Through experiential learning techniques, breakout sessions, and interactive lectures, program directors can learn from peers and build their network.

Chair:

Alfred I Lee , MD,PhD
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven,  CT

Speakers:

Alan E. Mast , MD, PhD
Versiti Blood Center of Wisconsin
Milwaukee,  WI
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Cecelia Calhoun , MD,MBA,MPH
Yale University
New Haven,  CT
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Soo Park , MD
University of California San Diego
San Diego,  CA
Mentorship and Career Development

Joanne Filicko-O'Hara , MD
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia,  PA
Mentorship and Career Development

Valentina Baez Sosa , MD
MedStar Washington Hospital
Washington,  DC
How the Personal Characteristics of Grit and Resilience Relate to Physician Well-Being  

Leslie Renee Ellis , MD
Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest Baptist Health
Winston-Salem,  NC
How the Personal Characteristics of Grit and Resilience Relate to Physician Well

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Women in Hematology Networking Dinner


Monday, December 12, 2022, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Hilton New Orleans Riverside , St. Charles Ballroom

This dinner and lecture provides a space where all can gather in an informal environment, interact with peers, connect with role models and potential mentors, and become inspired and empowered to overcome the challenges women face in hematology.

Speaker:

Arghavan Salles , MD, PhD
Stanford University
Stanford,  CA
Building Your Dream Career, Come What May

Spotlight Sessions

Underrepresented minorities in clinical trials for hematologic malignancies: what's the data on the data?


Monday, December 12, 2022, 10: 30 a.m. - 11: 45 a.m.
Ernest N. Morial Convention Center , R06-R09

The management of multiple myeloma, a condition 2-3 times more incident in Black than in White individuals, was revolutionized in the past 15 years by the development of a large number of new agents, longer, more complex and costly therapy. Therefore, multiple myeloma presents as excellent scenario to study disparities in clinical trial participation and outcomes. Although individuals of racial-ethnic minorities are under-represented in clinical trials for new drug registration in multiple myeloma, when enrolled their outcome is the same or even better than in other patient groups. This session will discuss available data on minority participation in myeloma trials, explore possible root causes and provide recommendations to assure representation of minority patients such as prospective enrollment goals and eligibility criteria which permit inclusion of real-world patients. Reforming the new drug development paradigm will allow for assessing both efficacy and toxicity of novel agents in an inclusive, real-world multiple myeloma patient population.

Chair:

Kenneth C. Anderson , MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Luciano J. Megala Costa , MD,PhD
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham,  AL
Discuss historical percentages of URM enrollment in clinical trials and theories for this data

Sikander Ailawadhi
Mayo Clinic
Jacksonville,  FL
Discuss approaches to improve enrollment and outcomes

Rayne H. Rouce , MD
Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital
Houston,  TX
Discuss approaches to increase the proportion of underrepresented minorities in the clinical investigator/clinical research pathway.

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Trainee Activities and Services

Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) (In-Person)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom

Blood Buddies are 10-minute speed mentoring meetings. Come ready for your questions for faculty! back to top

Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) (In-Person)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 2:40 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom

Blood Buddies are 10-minute speed mentoring meetings. Come ready for your questions for faculty! back to top

Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) (In-Person)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 4:35 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom

Blood Buddies are 10-minute speed mentoring meetings. Come ready for your questions for faculty! back to top

Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (Virtual)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
VIRTUAL PROGRAM

Blood Buddies are 10-minute speed mentoring meetings. Virtual buddies are available for meetings with virtual trainee attendees. Please use the meeting networking tool to schedule a Blood Buddy meeting. back to top

Blood Drop: ASH Medical Educators Institute (ASH MEI)


Friday, December 9, 2022
4:35 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1
Friday, December 9, 2022
4:50 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH Medical Educators Institute.

Speaker:

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Blood Drop: ASH Medical Educators Institute (ASH MEI)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 12: 31 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH Medical Educators Institute.

Speaker:

Srikanth Nagalla , MBBS
Baptist Health South Florida
Miami,  FL
Blood Drop: ASH Medical Educators Institute (ASH MEI)

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Blood Drop: ASH-Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP)


Friday, December 9, 2022
2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 7
Friday, December 9, 2022
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 7

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH-Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP).

Speaker:

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Blood Drop: ASH-Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 12: 31 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 7

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH-Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP).

Speaker:

Justin Taylor , MD
University of Miami, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
Miami,  FL
Blood Drop: ASH-Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program (AMFDP)

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Blood Drop: Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI)


Friday, December 9, 2022
1:30 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1
Friday, December 9, 2022
1:50 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute.

Speaker:

Jeffrey D. Lebensburger , DO
University of Alabama At Birmingham
Birmingham,  AL
Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI)

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Blood Drop: Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 34 p.m. - 12: 35 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute.

Speaker:

Jeffrey D. Lebensburger , DO
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham,  AL
Blood Drop: Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI)

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


Friday, December 9, 2022
1:30 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2
Friday, December 9, 2022
1:50 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Speaker:

Tamara J. Dunn , MD
Stanford University
Stanford,  CA
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


Friday, December 9, 2022
2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2
Friday, December 9, 2022
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Speaker:

Tiffany Lin Lucas , MD
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco,  CA
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


Friday, December 9, 2022
4:35 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2
Friday, December 9, 2022
4:50 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Speaker:

Alan E. Mast , MD, PhD
Versiti (Blood Center of Wisconsin)
Milwaukee,  WI
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 12: 31 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Speaker:

Tamara J. Dunn , MD
Stanford University
Stanford,  CA
Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 32 p.m. - 12: 33 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Speaker:

Tiffany Lin Lucas , MD
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco,  CA
Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 34 p.m. - 12: 35 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 2

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Speaker:

Alan E. Mast , MD, PhD
Versiti Blood Center of Wisconsin
Milwaukee,  WI
Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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Blood Drop: Minority Medical Student Award Program (MMSAP)


Friday, December 9, 2022
1:30 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 5
Friday, December 9, 2022
1:50 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 5

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH Minority Medical Student Award Program (MMSAP). back to top

Blood Drop: Quality Improvement


Friday, December 9, 2022
2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 6
Friday, December 9, 2022
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 6

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on quality improvement.

Speaker:

Elizabeth J Shpall , MD
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Quality Improvement

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Blood Drop: Quality Improvement


Friday, December 9, 2022
4:35 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 6
Friday, December 9, 2022
4:50 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 6

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on quality improvement.

Speaker:

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Blood Drop: Quality Improvement


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 12: 31 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 6

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on quality improvement.

Speaker:

Donald M. Arnold , MD, MSc
McMaster University
Hamilton,  ON, Canada
Blood Drop: Quality Improvement

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Blood Drop: Quality Improvement


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 34 p.m. - 12: 35 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 6

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on quality improvement.

Speaker:

Elizabeth J Shpall , MD
University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Blood Drop: Quality Improvement

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Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease


Friday, December 9, 2022
1:30 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8
Friday, December 9, 2022
1:50 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on Sickle Cell Disease.

Speaker:

Jane S Hankins , MD,MS
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Sickle Cell Disease

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Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease


Friday, December 9, 2022
2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8
Friday, December 9, 2022
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on Sickle Cell Disease.

Speaker:

Sophie M. Lanzkron , MD
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Baltimore,  MD
Sickle Cell Disease

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Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease


Friday, December 9, 2022
4:35 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8
Friday, December 9, 2022
4:50 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on Sickle Cell Disease.

Speaker:

John J. Strouse , MD, PhD
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham,  NC
Sickle Cell Disease

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Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 12: 31 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on Sickle Cell Disease.

Speaker:

Jane S Hankins , MD,MS
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis,  TN
Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease

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Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 32 p.m. - 12: 33 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on Sickle Cell Disease.

Speaker:

Sophie M. Lanzkron , MD
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
Baltimore,  MD
Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease

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Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 34 p.m. - 12: 35 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 8

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on Sickle Cell Disease.

Speaker:

John J. Strouse , MD, PhD
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham,  NC
Blood Drop: Sickle Cell Disease

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Blood Drop: Translational Research Training in Hematology (TRTH)


Friday, December 9, 2022
2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1
Friday, December 9, 2022
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH/EHA Transnational Research Training in Hematology program.

Speaker:

Andres Chang
Emory University
Atlanta,  GA
Translational Research Training in Hematology (TRTH)

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Blood Drop: Translational Research Training in Hematology (TRTH)


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 32 p.m. - 12: 33 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 1

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on the ASH/EHA Transnational Research Training in Hematology program.

Speaker:

Andres Chang , MD,PhD
Emory University
Atlanta,  GA
Blood Drop: Translational Research Training in Hematology (TRTH)

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Blood Drop: Wellness


Friday, December 9, 2022
2:40 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9
Friday, December 9, 2022
3:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on wellness.

Speaker:

Paul A S Fishkin , MD
Illinois Cancer Care
Peoria,  IL
Wellness

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Blood Drop: Wellness


Friday, December 9, 2022
1:30 p.m. - 1:40 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9
Friday, December 9, 2022
1:50 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on wellness.

Speaker:

Laura De Castro , MD,MBBS
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Pittsburgh,  PA
Wellness

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Blood Drop: Wellness


Friday, December 9, 2022
4:35 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9
Friday, December 9, 2022
4:50 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on wellness.

Speaker:

Peter A. Kouides , MD
Mary M. Gooley Hemophilia Center
Rochester,  NY
Wellness

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Blood Drop: Wellness


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 30 p.m. - 12: 31 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on wellness.

Speaker:

Laura Decastro , MD
Duke University Medical Center
Pittsburgh,  PA
Blood Drop: Wellness

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Blood Drop: Wellness


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 32 p.m. - 12: 33 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on wellness.

Speaker:

Paul A S Fishkin , MD
Illinois Cancer Care
Peoria,  IL
Blood Drop: Wellness

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Blood Drop: Wellness


Friday, December 9, 2022, 12: 34 p.m. - 12: 35 p.m.
Mardi Gras World , River City Ballroom 9

Blood Drops are micro-learning sessions that are 5-10 minutes long focused on various topics. This presentation focuses on wellness.

Speaker:

Peter A. Kouides , MD
Mary M. Gooley Hemophilia Center
Rochester,  NY
Blood Drop: Wellness

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