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Programs

Annual Meeting Sessions on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

As a global hematology community, ASH understands the importance of having individuals with diverse perspectives and experiences in all areas of the field. As a subspecialty in medicine, we are all striving to improve the outcomes for individuals with hematologic diseases. One tool in our toolkit to improve outcomes is a deeper understanding of causes of disparities in outcomes for our patients. We invite you to learn more and participate in the following sessions at the 63rd ASH Annual Meeting to learn more about the science of how differences in identity impact outcomes and how to mitigate those differences and achieve equitable outcomes for all individuals with hematologic diseases and disorders.


ASH Poster Walks

ASH Poster Walk on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Hematologic Malignancies and Cell Therapy


December 16, 2021, 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Virtual Meeting Platform Only

Although hematopoietic cell transplantation and cellular therapies (TCT) are potentially curative therapies for high-risk or advanced hematologic malignancies, disparities impact the provision of care for TCT candidates and recipients. The ASH Poster Walk on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Hematologic Malignancies and Cell Therapy will highlight work being done to investigate and address factors which impact the provision of care across malignant hematology for racialized patients, those of lower socio-economic status, or other vulnerable groups. The walk will also feature work being done to make the field more inclusive for patients and practitioners across race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status, nationality, and disability. Review of this research will improve participant understanding of disparities in malignant hematology and TCT, which is necessary to identify specific patient groups at risk for compromised care. This information is a pre-requisite to enhance outcomes and care delivery. The poster walk will also serve to connect stakeholders interested in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in malignant hematology and TCT, and will facilitate discussions on the state of DEI research in the field. We will discuss how such efforts can support critically important work to diversify patient populations, mitigate barriers to care, and maximize the equitable provision of optimal TCT for less or under-privileged groups.

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ASH Poster Walk on Financial Toxicity in Hematologic Malignancies


December 16, 2021, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Virtual Meeting Platform Only

Financial toxicity associated with cancer treatment is increasingly recognized as a significant barrier to quality care, with numerous studies demonstrating this association in solid tumors and blood cancers. With the advent of advanced and targeted therapeutics, long-term survival trends for many hematologic malignancies have seen dramatic increases over the last decade. Often, patients and survivors continue to require chronic maintenance therapies or follow-up outpatient visits, leading to financial burden and toxicity over time.

Over the last few years, studies investigating financial toxicity associated with hematologic malignancies have started moving away from descriptive studies to interventional approaches. The purpose of this Poster Walk is to highlight the timely and interesting studies in this area of high importance to patients with hematologic malignancies, with significant implications in the domains of quality of life, quality of care, and health policy.

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ASH Poster Walk on Geriatric Hematology: Selecting the Right Treatment for the Patient, Not Just the Disease


Wednesday, December 15, 2021, 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Virtual Meeting Platform Only

Abstracts incorporating the principles of geriatrics into research and clinical practice of caring for older adults with hematologic conditions (both malignant and nonmalignant) are of increasing interest to ASH participants. The ASH Poster Walk on Geriatric Hematology will aggregate these diverse abstracts into a single discussion, allowing key opinion leaders to provide context on the current state of the art in geriatric hematology, covering topics including elderly-specific therapeutic trials, frailty and geriatric assessment.

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ASH Poster Walk on Healthcare Quality Improvement


Wednesday, December 15, 2021, 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Virtual Meeting Platform Only

The ASH Committee on Quality (COQ) will host this year’s ASH Poster Walk on Healthcare Quality Improvement, presenting abstracts focused on quality improvement, covering both malignant and non-malignant topics. Quality improvement projects and quality-related outcomes research are integral to helping clinicians and their institutions deliver the most appropriate care in an efficient and effective manner, while avoiding unnecessary tests, procedures and medical errors. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has made these issues particularly acute, especially in the context of clinicians seeking to monitor and rapidly implement guidance (including the ASH guidelines on the use of anticoagulation in patients with COVID-19). Quality improvement projects are also increasingly encouraged or required for hematology trainees; highlighting practice-changing work in the field can provide models for trainees and early-career hematologists to follow at their own institutions.

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ASH Poster Walk on Pediatric Non-malignant Hematology Highlights


Wednesday, December 15, 2021, 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Virtual Meeting Platform Only

The ASH Poster Walk on Pediatric Non-malignant Hematology will review the poster highlights for new and emerging research that you must see in pediatric hematology -- including thrombosis/hemostasis, immune cytopenias, hemoglobinopathies, and other rare hematologic pediatric conditions. Join others interested in pediatric hematology and network with them as well as meeting the authors of these selected abstracts. Learn about where cutting edge research is in this field in 2021; and we hope you leave with exciting research questions (and maybe collaborations) of your own as a result!

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ASH Poster Walk on What's Hot in Sickle Cell Disease


Wednesday, December 15, 2021, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Virtual Meeting Platform Only

Sickle cell disease (SCD) affects 100,000 people living in the US and 250-300,000 births annually worldwide. Despite its frequency, the natural history of SCD and its complications remain poorly understood. Over the past decade, clinical research has led to much progress in disease management, identifying novel therapeutic targets and FDA approval of two new therapies, crizanlizumab and voxelotor, in the fall of 2019. For the past 18 months, SCD research has been over-shadowed by the COVID-19 pandemic and many hematologists not directly involved in this work may not be up to date on recent findings. This compounds the known health care disparities in this field. We plan to highlight six poster abstracts focused on clinical research in SCD to review critically and discuss with the authors SCD to increase dissemination of their data. The organizers of this poster walk bring expertise in adult and pediatric hematology and pulmonary/critical care to the discussion and represent leadership from two major sickle cell centers in the United States.

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Education Program

AML: So Many Options, So Little Time - Live Q&A


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 4:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Sidney Marcus Auditorium, Level 4

The landscape of advances in AML therapy has rapidly expanded over the last few year. New options for treating patients who are older or frail as well as those fit and candidates for transplant are now available and are being utilized within their approved indications as well as in ongoing clinical trials. This education session will describe these new agents and combinations as well as provide insight into areas of investigation and upcoming novel agents. Specific aims include reviewing indications for inclusion of novel agents in initial therapy versus in the relapse/salvage setting. We will address the area of maintenance therapy after induction and consolidation with or without transplant including duration of therapy and response monitoring. And finally we will address which patient populations are most appropriate for each agent and review particularly challenging scenarios such as elderly / unfit patients, secondary AML, recurrence after prior targeted therapy and other high risk subgroups.

Dr Felicitas Thol will outline recent developments in the treatment of newly diagnosed AML. She will discuss initial diagnostic approaches and give details about indications and efficacy of newly approved treatment options. In this talk a treatment algorithm for newly diagnosed and relapsed AML patients will be outlined.

Dr. Christian Thiede will focus his discussion on the use of maintenance therapies following induction and consolidation therapy. This will include both transplanted and transplant-ineligible patient populations. He will include a discussion of MRD (measureable residual disease) and its application to maintenance surveillance in AML patients.

Dr. Margaret Kasner will address which patient populations are likely to benefit from the recently approved and novel investigational agents. She will address particularly challenging scenarios including elderly / unfit patients and secondary AML subgroups. The talk will include a discussion of recurrence after prior targeted therapy including how to sequence therapies and resistance mechanisms. Finally there will be a discussion of novel agents under investigation for addressing difficult to treat patient populations.

Chair:

Margaret Kasner , MD, MSCE
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia,  PA

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How Can We Ensure That Everyone Who Needs A Transplant Can Get One? - Live Q&A


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 2:00 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B206, Level 2

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) remains one of the most potent therapies to eradicate high-risk hematologic malignancies and hematologic/immune disorders.  Access to alloHCT is constrained at the patient level due to concerns of procedure-related morbidity and mortality. At the system level, seen and invisible factors conspire to further limit access.  Expanding alloHCT to older patients, wider donor availability, and socio-economic development has sparked utilization to nearly double in the past decade.   Further adaptions will be necessary to ensure all patients who need a transplant have the option to receive one.

 

Dr. Andrew Artz will discuss emerging data on the use and outcomes of alloHCT among older patients.  An updated approach on how to consider and optimize older candidates for alloHCT-from diagnosis to transplant-will be presented, with special attention on tools to characterize heterogeneity of aging. 

Dr. Vanderson Rocha will describe an international perspective on global growth of allotransplant related to demographics, socioeconomic factors, and providers and health care systems.  He will detail the expanding eligibility of patients (elderly with or without comorbidities) and donors (unrelated and haploidentical).  Finally, Dr Rocha will explore how new technologies may further increase access and improve outcomes of allotransplants.

Dr. Navneet Majhail will outline a United States perspective on alloHCT access.  How race, geography, socio-economics and other factors present both barriers and opportunities will be explained.

Chair:

Andrew S. Artz , MD,MS
City of Hope
Duarte,  CA

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Management Strategies for Sickle Cell Disease - Live Q&A


Monday, December 13, 2021, 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, C202-C204, Level 2

The management of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) has rapidly changed over the past few years. With the approval of new medications, however, we now have new questions in addition to old ones. Although there are significant benefits documented with the use of hydroxyurea, we are still learning how to integrate the use of the newly approved medications into care. Specifically, four drugs are now approved for management of SCD and need careful consideration as to which patient will benefit from each of these. In addition, patients with SCD who are undergoing surgery are at high risk for complications and require strategies to improve outcomes. Finally, complications such as priapism, leg ulcers, and pulmonary hypertension have significant associated morbidity and mortality, also requiring treatment considerations. This session will address the approach to incorporating treatment of patients with SCD with these new medications as well as the approach to these significant complications. Dr. Leila Jerome Clay will outline the history and presentation and complications of sickle cell disease. She will discuss the historical perspective of the disease and an overview of the recent treatment modalities and management of sickle cell disease.    Dr. Charity Oyedeji will outline optimization strategies for individuals with sickle cell disease undergoing surgery. She will describe strategies to minimize risks of postoperative complications in individuals with sickle cell disease, summarize the evidence for preoperative transfusion, postoperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, and postoperative pain management. Dr Payal Desai will discuss the current data on leg ulcers, priapism, and pulmonary HTN in sickle cell disease.  She will note the current limited data on effective therapies and also review the current ongoing trials in the field.

Chair:

Nirmish Shah , MD
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham,  NC

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Pregnancy in Special Populations: Challenges and Solutions - Live Q&A


Monday, December 13, 2021, 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, C101 Auditorium

Dr. Rezan Abdul-Kadir will include a case presentation and discussion on the management of pregnancy in women with different types of von Willebrand Disease.

Chair:

Marie Scully , MD
University College London
London,  ENG, United Kingdom

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Oral and Poster Abstracts

613. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Clinical and Epidemiological: Outcomes and Omics Potpourri


Monday, December 13, 2021, 2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Thomas Murphy Ballroom 1-2, Level 5

Clinical and epidemiological studies of acute myeloid leukemias, including risks factors, diagnosis, complications, treatment of complications, prognosis, and long-term outcomes such as quality-of-life. Translational biomarker, “omics” or minimal residual disease studies may be more appropriate for 617. For health services and outcomes research related to AML see 903 or 906.

Speakers:

Karilyn Larkin , MD
Ohio State University Hospital
Columbus,  OH
Multi-Dimensional Analysis of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Landscape Cross-Continents Reveals Age Associated Trends in Mutations and Outcomes

Onyee Chan , MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa,  FL
Mutations Highly Specific for Secondary AML Are Associated with Poor Outcomes in Patients with NPM1-Mutated ELN Favorable Risk AML

Pallavi Galera
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York,  NY
Clinical and Genomic Characterization of Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Mixed Phenotype

Armin Rashidi , MD, PhD
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis,  MN
Circulating Metabolomics Suggest Neutropenic Fever As a Metabolic Derangement Related to Intestinal Tissue Damage and Gut Dysbiosis

Scott C Howard , MD MSc
University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Memphis,  TN
Therapy Biosimulation Using the Cellworks Computational Omics Biology Model (CBM) Is Predictive of Individual Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Patient Probability of Clinical Response (CR) and Overall Survival (OS): Mycare-023

Chezi Ganzel
Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem,  Israel
Patients with AML Who Achieve Long Term Complete Remission Do Not Have a Normal Life Expectancy When Compared to the General Population. Analysis of 3,012 Patients Enrolled on 9 Consecutive ECOG-ACRIN Trials

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902. Health Services Research—Lymphoid Malignancies: CAR-T and Immunotherapy in the Real World


Sunday, December 12, 2021, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B206, Level 2

Health services researchfocused on lymphoid malignancies should be submitted to this category. Health services research aims to identify the most effective ways to organize, manage, finance, and deliver high quality care; reduce medical errors; and improve patient safety. Studies relating to the delivery of high quality care, economics of hematologic services (cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-benefit/cost-utility analysis, resource utilization, epidemiology of cost and delivery of care), decision analyses, clinical pathways and practice guidelines, patient preference studies, studies of decision aids or other patient tools, informatics (telemedicine, computer decision support), hematology education research (training programs, training and developing countries), and studies of innovative healthcare delivery models, including in developing countries, belong in this category. Quality improvement projects are also appropriate. Submissions on how healthcare services impact patient or population outcomes should be submitted to category 904. Submissions on drugs or therapeutic trials are not appropriate and will be better served in other lymphoid malignancy categories.

Speakers:

Petros Pechlivanoglou , M.Sc., PhD
Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute
Toronto,  Canada
Blinatumomab Is Cost-Effective Compared to Standard Chemotherapy for Children with High Risk Relapses of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Using Population-Based Healthcare Data

Samer Al Hadidi , MD,MSc
Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Houston,  TX
Enrollment of Black Americans in Pivotal Clinical Trials Supporting Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-T Cell Therapy Approval in Hematological Malignancies

Rachel Cusatis
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee,  WI
Worsening Financial Toxicity Among Patients Receiving Chimeric Antigen Receptor t-Cell (CAR-T) Therapy: A Mixed Methods Longitudinal Study

Jonas Paludo , MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester,  MN
Pilot Implementation of Remote Patient Monitoring Program for Outpatient Management of CAR-T Cell Therapy

Kelly Kenzik , PhD
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham,  AL
Hospitalizations and Emergency Department (ED) Visits after CAR-T Therapy - Real World Experience in Commercially Insured Patients

Geoffrey Shouse , DO, PhD
City of Hope National Medical Center
Duarte,  CA
Physical Therapy Assessment of Baseline Function and Endurance Predicts Short Term Outcomes in Commercial CAR T Patients with Lymphoma

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904. Outcomes Research—Non-Malignant Conditions: Health Equity and Survivorship in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant


Sunday, December 12, 2021, 9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B207-B208, Level 2

Outcomes research related to non-malignant hematologic conditions or treatments, including transplantation as an overall therapeutic approach, even if applied to a malignancy. Outcomes research is a branch of health services research that focuses on how health services impact health outcomes for individuals and populations. Submissions to this category should include outcomes studies based on real world data sets including big data or registry studies; studies of patient-reported outcomes; real world studies of quality of life, symptom management or palliation; studies reporting on gaps between ideal and actual care; and studies of health outcomes in the developing world. Studies exploring how race, ethnicity, gender, age and other factors influence healthcare outcomes also belong in this category. Quality improvement projects should be submitted to section 901. Submissions on therapeutic trials (including clinical trials with a quality-of-life endpoint) are not appropriate for this section and will be better served in other categories.

Speakers:

Rachel Cusatis
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee,  WI
Health-Related Quality of Life in a Biologic Assignment Trial of Reduced Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Based on Donor Availability in Patients Aged 50-75 with Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Julia H. Joo
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
Cleveland,  OH
Community Health Status and Long-Term Outcomes in 1-Year Survivors of Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Warren Fingrut , MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, 
Racial Disparities in Access to Alternative Donor Allografts Persist in the Era of “Donors for All”

Mesire Aydin
Amsterdam University Medical Centers
Amsterdam,  Netherlands
Haploidentical Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Sickle Cell Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Staci D. Arnold , MD,MBA,MPH
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta/Emory University
Atlanta,  GA
Long-Term Quality of Life after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease: A Preliminary Report from the Sickle Cell Transplant Evaluation of Long Term and Late Effects Registry (STELLAR)

Zeina Al-Mansour , MD
University of Florida
Gainesville,  FL
Distress, Health-Related Quality of Life (HQOL) and Confidence in Survivorship Information (CSI) in Older (=60 Years) Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT) Patients

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904. Outcomes Research—Non-Malignant Conditions: Hemostasis, Anticoagulation, and Thrombosis


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Hall A1

Outcomes research related to non-malignant hematologic conditions or treatments, including transplantation as an overall therapeutic approach, even if applied to a malignancy. Outcomes research is a branch of health services research that focuses on how health services impact health outcomes for individuals and populations. Submissions to this category should include outcomes studies based on real world data sets including big data or registry studies; studies of patient-reported outcomes; real world studies of quality of life, symptom management or palliation; studies reporting on gaps between ideal and actual care; and studies of health outcomes in the developing world. Studies exploring how race, ethnicity, gender, age and other factors influence healthcare outcomes also belong in this category. Quality improvement projects should be submitted to section 901. Submissions on therapeutic trials (including clinical trials with a quality-of-life endpoint) are not appropriate for this section and will be better served in other categories.

Speakers:

Deborah M Siegal , MD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Ottawa,  Canada
A Population Cohort Study to Evaluate the Risk of Ischemic Stroke Among Individuals with a New Diagnosis of Cancer Compared to Matched Cancer-Free Controls: Impact of Prior Stroke History

Wilson L Da Costa Jr.
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston,  TX
Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Cancer Associated Thrombosis Among Underserved Patients with Cancer

Diego Adrianzen Herrera , MD
Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont
Burlington,  VT
Peripheral Blood Cytopenia and Risk of Cancer Mortality

Haesuk Park , PhD
University of Florida
Gainesville,  FL
Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Extended Anticoagulant Therapy Among Medicare Beneficiaries with Venous Thromboembolism

Jordan K Schaefer , MD
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor,  MI
Outcomes of Direct Oral Anticoagulants with Aspirin Versus Warfarin with Aspirin for Atrial Fibrillation and/or Venous Thromboembolic Disease

Divyaswathi Citla Sridhar , MD
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Little Rock,  AR
Surgery-Associated Bleeding Risk in Patients with Platelet Function Disorders – a Cross Sectional Study with the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network Dataset (ATHNdataset)

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904. Outcomes Research—Non-Malignant Conditions: Sickle Cell Disease Management and Outcomes Across the Lifespan


Sunday, December 12, 2021, 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Thomas Murphy Ballroom 1-2, Level 5

Outcomes research related to non-malignant hematologic conditions or treatments, including transplantation as an overall therapeutic approach, even if applied to a malignancy. Outcomes research is a branch of health services research that focuses on how health services impact health outcomes for individuals and populations. Submissions to this category should include outcomes studies based on real world data sets including big data or registry studies; studies of patient-reported outcomes; real world studies of quality of life, symptom management or palliation; studies reporting on gaps between ideal and actual care; and studies of health outcomes in the developing world. Studies exploring how race, ethnicity, gender, age and other factors influence healthcare outcomes also belong in this category. Quality improvement projects should be submitted to section 901. Submissions on therapeutic trials (including clinical trials with a quality-of-life endpoint) are not appropriate for this section and will be better served in other categories.

Speakers:

William Kwesi Ghunney , MBChB, BSc
Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital
Accra,  Ghana
In Africa, a High Proportion of Adults with HbSC Meet American Society of Hematology's Eligibility Criteria for Severe Sickle Cell Disease and Starting Hydroxyurea Therapy in a Clinical Trial Setting

Miriam Kwarteng-Siaw , MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Morbidity and Mortality Associated with Hemodialysis Versus Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Caused By Sickle Cell Disease

Samantha C Fisch , BS
University of California Davis School of Medicine
Sacramento,  CA
Pregnancy Outcomes in Women with Sickle Cell Disease in California: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Andrew D. Campbell , MD
Childrens National Hospital
Silver Spring,  MD
Frequency of Vaso-Occlusive Crises Is Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients with Sickle Cell Disease: US Cross-Sectional Surveys of Adolescents and Caregivers

Soumitri Sil , PhD
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta,  GA
An Empirical Classification of Chronic Pain Subgroups in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Cluster-Analytic Approach

Charity I Oyedeji , MD
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham,  NC
Living Beyond Life Expectancy: Experience with Aging for Older Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

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905. Outcomes Research-Lymphoid Malignancies: Disparities in Patient Care and Outcomes


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B207-B208, Level 2

This session will focus on disparities including gaps in trial enrollment, diagnostic and therapeutic options as well as overall patient outcomes.

Speakers:

Lori Muffly , MD, MS
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford,  CA
Enrollment Characteristics and Outcomes of Hispanic and Black AYA ALL Patients Enrolled on a U.S. Intergroup Clinical Trial: A Comparison of the CALGB 10403 (Alliance) Cohort with U.S. Population-Level Data

Danny Luan , BS
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York,  NY
Evaluation of Eligibility Criteria in First-Line Clinical Trials for Follicular Lymphoma: A MER/LEO Database Analysis

Anurekha G. Hall , MD, MS
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Seattle,  WA
Access to CAR-T Cell Therapy in Underrepresented Populations: A Multicenter Cohort Study of Pediatric and Young Adult ALL Patients

Kana Tai Lucero
Long School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio,  TX
Uptake of Novel Agents (NAs) As First-Line Treatments for Black and White Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA): A Retrospective Cohort Study

Sumedha Arya , MD
University of Toronto
Toronto,  ON, Canada
The Impact of Marginalization on Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Overall Survival: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Miriam Kwarteng-Siaw , MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA
Association of Race, Ethnicity, Age and Socioeconomic Status with Access to Virtual Visits within the Brigham & Women’s Hospital Division of Hematology during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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906. Outcomes Research—Myeloid Malignancies: Health Equity and Disparities


Monday, December 13, 2021, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B211-B212, Level 2

Outcomes research related to myeloid malignancies should be submitted to this category. Studies of non-malignant conditions in cancer populations should be submitted to category 904. Outcomes research is a branch of health services research that focuses on how health services impact health outcomes for individuals and populations. Submissions to this category should include outcomes studies based on real world data sets including big data or registry studies; studies of patient-reported outcomes; real world studies of quality of life, symptom management or palliation; studies reporting on gaps between ideal and actual care; and studies of health outcomes in the developing world. Studies exploring how race, ethnicity, gender, age and other factors influence healthcare outcomes also belong in this category. Quality improvement projects should be submitted to 903. Submissions on therapeutic trials (including clinical trials with a quality-of-life endpoint) are not appropriate for this section and will be better served in other myeloid malignancy categories.

Speakers:

Karen Sweiss , PharmD
University of Illinois
Hinsdale,  IL
Social and Demographic Factors Contributing to COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

Rusha Bhandari , MD,MS
City of Hope
Duarte,  CA
Social Vulnerability Is a Clinically Important Predictor of Outcomes after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Lucie M Turcotte , MD
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis,  MN
Donor Socioeconomic Status As a Predictor of Altered Immune Function and Treatment Response Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancy

Madelyn Burkart , MD
Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago,  IL
Structural and Social Barriers to Survival in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Maya Schulpen , PhD MSc
Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology
Utrecht,  Netherlands
Increased Survival Disparities Among Children and Adolescents & Young Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Dutch Population-Based Study

Mycal Casey , DO
Augusta University Medical Center
Augusta,  GA
Are Pivotal Trials for Drugs Approved for Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Multiple Myeloma Representative of the Population Demographics Affected By These Diseases?

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906. Outcomes Research—Myeloid Malignancies: Real World Outcomes


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B312-B314

Outcomes research related to myeloid malignancies should be submitted to this category. Studies of non-malignant conditions in cancer populations should be submitted to category 904. Outcomes research is a branch of health services research that focuses on how health services impact health outcomes for individuals and populations. Submissions to this category should include outcomes studies based on real world data sets including big data or registry studies; studies of patient-reported outcomes; real world studies of quality of life, symptom management or palliation; studies reporting on gaps between ideal and actual care; and studies of health outcomes in the developing world. Studies exploring how race, ethnicity, gender, age and other factors influence healthcare outcomes also belong in this category. Quality improvement projects should be submitted to 903. Submissions on therapeutic trials (including clinical trials with a quality-of-life endpoint) are not appropriate for this section and will be better served in other myeloid malignancy categories.

Speakers:

Amer M. Zeidan , MD
Yale University
New Haven,  CT
Venetoclax Plus Azacitidine (VEN-AZA) Vs. Intensive Chemotherapy (IC) As Induction for Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML): Retrospective Analysis of an Electronic Medical Records (EMR) Database in the United States

David Cella , PhD
Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago,  IL
Symptoms and Impacts Reported By Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in Remission Post–Stem Cell Transplant

Gail J. Roboz , MD
Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian Hospital
New York,  NY
Treatment Patterns and Survival Outcomes of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Achieved Remission in the Connect® Myeloid Disease Registry

Pinkal Desai , MD,MPH
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York,  NY
Clinical Predictors of Outcome in Adult Patients with Acute Leukemias and Myelodysplastic Syndrome and COVID-19 Infection: Report from the American Society of Hematology Research Collaborative (ASH RC) Data Hub

Christopher E. Jensen , MD
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Chapel Hill,  NC
Time Spent at Home Among Older Adults with AML Treated with Hypomethylating Agents and Venetoclax

Rory M. Shallis , MD
Yale University School of Medicine
New Haven,  CT
Contemporary “Real World” Molecular Testing and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Adherence Patterns Among Older Pts with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the United States

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Scientific Program

Large Population Genomic Studies and Red Cell Disorders: A Revisionist View - Live Q&A


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, C108-C109, Level 1

In the past two decades, expanding knowledge of human genetics and its relation to disease onset and progression has contributed to transformational progress in the clinic. Genomic analyses of large populations studies have improved our understanding of the genetics of complex traits. By applying genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to blood cell traits, rare and low frequency variants have been identified that are clinically relevant. These large-scale studies are refining our view of blood disorders.  In this session, speakers will cover recent progress and advances in the understanding of human genetics related to red cells and other blood diseases. They will discuss approaches they employ to detect inherited genetic variations and evaluate how these impact blood disorders. Their topics include the identification of new genetic modifiers of sickle cell disease as well as the rise of clonal hematopoiesis and subsequent increased risk of malignancy. 

Dr.?Nicole Soranzo?will discuss the contribution of polygenic variation to blood traits and diseases. Genome wide association studies have revealed more than 10,000 inherited polymorphisms that contribute to traits derived from complete blood cell counts. The information from these genetic variants is combined into polygenic risk scores capturing a large proportion of heritability in blood trait phenotypes. She will discuss how the polygenic risk scores are then used to evaluate the contribution of inherited genetic variation to both malignant and non-malignant blood disorders. 

Dr. Laura Raffield will cover recent work to identify genetic modifiers for sickle cell trait and sickle cell disease associated complications (such as kidney disease and stroke), notably variants at the alpha globin locus. Dr. Raffield will lead a discussion of unpublished and ongoing work in cohorts from NHLBI’s Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine program (TOPMed). 

Dr. Steven McCarroll will examine clonal hematopoiesis (or clonally expanded blood cells with somatic mutations) commonly acquired with age and increase risk of blood cancer. Dr. McCarroll will review chromosomal alterations that are known to date to be associated with blood clones and discuss advances in identifying the underlying mechanisms.  His presentation will include the inherited genetic variations in genes associated with highly increased vulnerability to clonal hematopoiesis and the implications for malignancies. 

Chair:

Saghi Ghaffari , MD, PhD
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York,  NY

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Scientific Symposia

Joint Scientific and Education Program Symposia on Barriers to Successful Clinical Trial Design & Accrual - Live Q&A


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 4:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, B405-B407, Level 4

This session will address barriers to successful clinical trial design and accrual through the lens of diversity, equity and inclusion. The session is meant to address study design strategies that should be improved in the context of DEI; discuss the role socioeconomic barriers play in patient enrollment; and provide tools on how to address implicit bias in clinical research.

CoChair:

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Special-Interest Sessions

ASH Practice Partnership Lunch Program


Sunday, December 12, 2021, 11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Omni Hotel at CNN Center, International Ballroom A-D, M2/International Ballroom Level

Chair:

Chancellor E Donald , MD
Tulane University School of Medicine
New Orleans,  LA

Speakers:

Michael D Tarantino , MD
Bleeding and Clotting Disorders Insitute
Peoria,  IL
Opportunities for Practices to Expand Telehealth Services and Focus on Recruitment and Retention Efforts

Christopher R. Flowers , MD
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston,  TX
Lessons Learned on Disparities and Developing New Delivery Points of Care

Jennifer Green , MD
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville,  TN
Exploring the Changing Methods of Training Fellows and Residents and the Use of CME for Hematologists in Practice

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Blood and Beyond


Sunday, December 12, 2021, 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Sidney Marcus Auditorium, Level 4

Chair:

Nancy Berliner , MD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston,  MA

Speaker:

Paul Farmer , MD,PhD
Harvard Medical School
Boston,  MA
Irrigating the Clinical Desert: Clinical and Laboratory Services and Medical Emergencies

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Grassroots Network Lunch


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Omni Hotel at CNN Center, International Ballroom A-D, M2/International Ballroom Level

The ASH Grassroots Network Lunch provides a forum for interested members to learn how they can participate in ASH’s advocacy efforts, communicate with Congress, become effective advocates for hematology, and discuss the Society’s legislative and regulatory priorities. The keynote speaker for this year's Grassroots Network Lunch will be Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Walensky will discuss efforts by the CDC to both highlight and address health disparities and racism as a threat to the nation's health as well as the important role hematologists can play in furthering this goal.

Chair:

Jennifer Holter Chakrabarty , MD
University of Oklahoma
Oklahoma City,  OK

Speaker:

Rochelle Walensky , MD, MPH
Centers For Disease Control and Prevention
Atlanta,  GA
CDC's Efforts to Address Health Disparity as a Threat to the Nation's Health

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Health Equity Rounds


Sunday, December 12, 2021, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Grand Ballroom D2-E, M4/Grand Ballroom Level

Health Equity Rounds are interactive, case-based discussions with an interdisciplinary panel to include hematologists, health equity/public health experts, patients, and patient advocates to discuss health equity issues within hematology. 

Health Equity Rounds Goals and Objectives:

  1. Create a longitudinal, bi-directional clinical case-based series to encourage providers to recognize and explore the impact of implicit bias and systemic racism on patients with hematologic conditions
  2. To inspire participants to engage at the individual, community, and institutional level to address and mitigate bias and systemic racism
  3. To provide solutions/tools to enhance providers’ confidence in their abilities to decrease the impact of implicit bias at the individual, community, and institutional levels

The pilot series will kick-off with a 60-minute in-person session at the 2021 ASH Annual Meeting. Following the meeting, a series of bi-monthly webinars will be conducted focusing on various disease cases and provocative health equity topics. The series will include interactive and engaging techniques through experiential learning, breakout sessions, and interactive lectures. The pilot series will conclude with an in-person meeting at the 2022 ASH Annual Meeting.

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Promoting Minorities in Hematology Oral Presentations Room II


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Grand Ballroom D1/D2

Chair:

Rayne H. Rouce , MD
Clinical Care Center-Texas Children's Hospital
Houston,  TX

Speakers:

Beatrice Razzo , MD
NYU Langone Health
New-York,  NY
Clinical and Biological Factors That Affect Presentation and Outcomes in Multiple Myeloma Patients with Excess Body Weight

Dalina Laffita
FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY
Boca Raton, 
Evaluation of Low Dose Radiation Therapy Alongside CAR T Cell Therapy As a Therapeutic Treatment for Hematological Cancers

Guido David Pelaez
George Washington University
Washington,  DC
Evaluation of Selective HDAC6 Inhibition As a Potentiator of Antigen-Targeted Immunotherapy in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Gygeria Manuel
MOREHOUSE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
Conyers,  GA
Understanding Barriers to Clinical Trial Enrollment for African American Patients with Lymphoma

Mohammad Abubakar
Lincoln Memorial
Harrogate, 
Targeting U5 snRNP200 for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Therapy

Rigoberto De Jesus Pizarro , MD
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
San Antonio, 
Roots of Socioeconomic and Biological Disparities Among Hispanics with Multiple Myeloma

Sarah Addison , BS
Ohio State College of Medicine
Columbus, 
Identifying Disparities in Survival Among Older Adults with Multiple Myeloma Based on Rural Versus Urban Residence

Selinam Norgbe
Creighton University School of Medicine
Omaha, 
Integrative Genomic Analysis in Relapsing Mantle Cell Lymphoma Patients

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Promoting Minorities in Hematology Oral Presentations Room III


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Grand Ballroom E, M4/Grand Ballroom Level

Chair:

Oreofe O. Odejide , MD,MPH
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA

Speakers:

Alfonso Molina , MD, MPH
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford,  CA
Epidemiologic Evaluation of Clinical Outcomes in Ethnic Minorities with Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Maryam Omar , BS
Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine
Rochester,  MN
Interleukin-6 Levels and Disease Activity in POEMS Syndrome

Mwanasha H. Merrill , MD
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston,  MA
Outcomes of Mature T-Cell and NK/T-Cell Lymphomas in Patients with and without HIV: Results from NA-Accord and Complete.

Oluwamayokun Oshinowo , BS
Medical College of Georgia
Lagrange,  GA
Defining the Mechanism for Impaired Platelet Forces in Immune Thrombocytopenia

Orly Leiva , MD
New York University Langone Health
New York,  NY
Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

Selamawit Addissie
Ohio State University
Columbus, 
Exploring the Benefits of Combination Antiviral Therapy for Treatment of EBV-Associated Primary Central Nervous Lymphoproliferative Disease (EBV-LPD)

Uzoamaka Obodo
Lincoln Memorial
Harrogate,  TN
Exploratory Analysis of the Association between Environmental Exposures to Toxins and Acute SCD Hospitalizations

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Special Scientific Session on Race and Science - Live Q&A


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 4:00 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Hall C2-C3

CoChair:

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Special Symposium on Quality: Identifying and Eliminating Inequity in the Provision of Healthcare


Saturday, December 11, 2021, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Hall C2-C3

This year's Special Symposium on Quality will focus on examining how systemic inequities impact healthcare quality, and what hematologists can do to promote more equitable provision of healthcare.  The session will include practical examples of the negative impact of inequity on the quality of care patients receive, proven mechanisms for effectuating meaningful change in health equity and outcomes, and a keynote address on the social and moral determinants of health.  The session will conclude with Q&A and a call-to-action for attendees to pursue their own quality improvement projects that address issues related to equity and/or implicit bias.

CoChair:

Speakers:

Lanetta Bronte-Hall , MD, MPH, MSPH
Foundation for Sickle Cell Disease Research
Hollywood,  FL
Mechanisms for Change in Health Equity

Maureen Okam Achebe , MD, MPH
Hematology Division Brigham and Women's
Boston,  MA
Equity in Patient Care and Outcomes

Kara Odom Walker , MD,MPH
Nemours Children's Health
Washington,  DC
The Social and Moral Determinants of Health / Equity in Healthcare

Trainee Activities and Services

Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (in-person)


Friday, December 10, 2021, 1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Tabernacle, Balcony- Section 204A

This is ASH’s premier trainee event complete with micro-learning sessions, mentorship opportunities, and more! It is only open to trainees wearing a blue badge.

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Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (in-person)


Friday, December 10, 2021, 4:35 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Tabernacle, Balcony- Section 204A

This is ASH’s premier trainee event complete with micro-learning sessions, mentorship opportunities, and more! It is only open to trainees wearing a blue badge.

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Blood Buddies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (in-person)


Friday, December 10, 2021, 2:40 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.
Tabernacle, Balcony- Section 204A

This is ASH’s premier trainee event complete with micro-learning sessions, mentorship opportunities, and more! It is only open to trainees wearing a blue badge.

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Blood Drop: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion



This is ASH’s premier trainee event complete with micro-learning sessions, mentorship opportunities, and more! It is only open to trainees wearing a blue badge.

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Blood Drop: Wellness



This is ASH’s premier trainee event complete with micro-learning sessions, mentorship opportunities, and more! It is only open to trainees wearing a blue badge.

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