American Society of Hematology

American Society of Hematology Selects 29 Medical Students for Minority Medical Student Award Program

Published on: October 02, 2018

(WASHINGTON, October 2, 2018) – The American Society of Hematology (ASH) today announced the names of 29 medical students selected to take part in the 2018 Minority Medical Student Award Program (MMSAP). This program encourages eligible underrepresented minority medical students to pursue careers in hematology by supporting them as they conduct their own hematology-related research project in the lab of a research mentor.

MMSAP participants will receive support in the amount of $7,000, which will help cover their research projects and travel expenses to the 60th ASH Annual Meeting in December, where they will present their research findings at the Promoting Minorities in Hematology event. In addition, each student is paired with two ASH mentors: a research mentor who will oversee the research project and a career-development mentor who will guide the participant throughout his or her MMSAP experience and beyond. They will also receive complimentary ASH membership throughout medical school and residency.  

ASH offers multiple options to accommodate the schedules of medical students interested in the program. Medical students can participate in a summer-long program, a year-long program, or a flexible program (MMSAP Flex), which allows them to spread out a shorter research experience across one year. These varied options fill existing gaps at critical intervening stages of training in the longitudinal pathway from medical student to hematologist by providing minority trainees with additional opportunities for doing hematology research and interacting one-on-one with both a research and career development mentor. 

The MMSAP is one of four programs under ASH’s Minority Recruitment Initiative, a series of programs committed to increasing the number of underrepresented minorities training in hematology-related fields and the number of minority hematologists with academic and research appointments.

The 2018 MMSAP summer participants and their research topics include:

RecipientProject TitleResearch MentorCareer-Development Mentor
Ijele Adimora
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Hanover, NH
Assessing risk of post-operative bleeding complications around heparin bridging protocol interventionMonic Drescher, MD
Dartmouth Hitchcock Memorial Hospital
Hanover, NH
Frederick Lansigan, MD
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Hanover, NH
Jennifer Afranie-Sakyi
Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine & Science
Chicago, IL
The role of ineffective mitophagy and mitophagy-inducing agents on sickle cell diseaseAngela Rivers, MD, PhD
University of Illinois Chicago
Chicago, IL
Robert Liem, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Rachel Alade
Frank H. Netter School of Medicine Quinnipiac University
North Haven, CT
Identifying risk factors associated with high medical resource utilization in adolescents and young adults with sickle cell diseaseLydia Pecker, MD
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, MD
Robert Bona, MD
Frank H. Netter School of Medicine Quinnipiac University
North Haven, CT
Anase Asom
Pritzker School of Medicine at The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
The role of BRCA1 in genomic instability and hematopoietic malignanciesLucy Godley, MD, PhD
Pritzker School of Medicine at The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Chicago, IL
Olatoyosi Odenike, MD
Pritzker School of Medicine at The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Chicago, IL
Rita Asuquo
Central Michigan University College of Medicine
Mount Pleasant, MI
Enhancing the anti-tumor activity of off-the-shelf Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) -specific T cells for treatment of EBV+ lymphomaRayne Rouce, MD
Texas Children's Hospital/Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX
Tycel Phillips, MD
Michigan Medicine
Ann Arbor, MI
Lissa Bair
University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine
Ottawa, ON
Reassessing the need for pre-operative transfusions in sickle cell disease patients with a high baseline hemoglobinEwurabena Simpson, MD, MPH, FRCP(C), FAAP
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario/University of Ottawa
Ottawa, ON
Marc Carrier, MD, MSc, FRCPC
University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine
Ottawa, ON
Mauricio Barreto
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, NC
Clinical investigation of cytokine levels in patients with sickle cell disease undergoing haploidentical nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantationCourtney Fitzhugh, MD
Sickle Cell Branch, NHLBI, NIH
Bethesda, MD
Georgette Dent, MD
UNC School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, NC
Elizabeth De Jesus
Tufts University School of Medicine
Boston, MA
Inherited thrombophilias and the risk of ischemic stroke in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysisAdam Cuker, MD, MS
Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Natasha M. Archer, MD
Boston Children's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Atinuke "Oyin" Dosunmu-Ogunbi
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Pittsburgh, PA
Oxidative stress and neurocognitive dysfunction in sickle cell diseaseEnrico Novelli, MD, MS
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
Gregory J. Kato, MD
Vascular Medicine Institute
Pittsburgh, PA
Ista Egbeto
Tufts University School of Medicine
Boston, MA
Understanding the cooperative impact of BCOR and U2AF1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesisR. Coleman Lindsley, MD, PhD
Dana-Faber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Gabriela S. Hobbs, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA
Tolulope Fatola
Meharry Medical College
Nashville, TN
Understanding the difference between clinical trials participants and real-world patients treated for mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphomaPeter Martin, MD, MS
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY
Adetola A. Kassim, MD, MS
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
Nashville, TN
Aldo Giaimo
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
Cincinnati, OH
Exploring the impact of germline mutations on the differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells into osteocytesLucy Godley, MD, PhD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Theodosia A. Kalfa, MD, PhD
Cincinnati Children's Hospital
Cincinnati, OH
Catherine Gutierrez
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA
Studying cancer evolution in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using DNA barcode-assisted lineage tracingCatherine Wu, MD
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Roger Belizaire, MD, PhD
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Boston, MA
Naima Hashi
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Columbus, OH
Cytomegalovirus modulation of miR-29b expression in natural killer cells in acute myeloid leukemiaRobert Baiocchi, MD, PhD
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Columbus, OH
Alison Walker, MD
The Ohio State University Medical Center
Columbus, OH
Nathanaelle “Onyi” Ibeziako
Tufts University School of Medicine
Boston, MA
BCL11A enhancer editing for the hemoglobinopathiesDaniel Bauer, MD, PhD
Harvard University
Boston, MA
Abner Louissaint, MD, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, MA
Sophia LeMaire
Howard University College of Medicine
Washington, D.C.
Ancestry and genetic admixture mapping for red blood cell antigen alloimmunization in adults with sickle cell diseaseJames Taylor, MD
Howard University Hospital, Center for Sickle Cell Disease
Washington, D.C.
David Bodine, PhD
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHLBI) at NIH
Bethesda, MD
Randolph Lyde, Jr., PhD
Temple University School of Medicine
Philadelphia, PA
Comparative analyses of platelet factor VIII expression by standard bone marrow transplantation versus intraosseous infusionMortimer Poncz, MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia/University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Lawrence F. Brass, MD, PhD
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Christina Marcelus
State University of New York Upstate Medical University
Syracuse, NY
Characterization of TRK fusions and response to TRK inhibition in hematologic malignanciesOmar Abdel-Wahab, MD
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Melody Smith, MD
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Jacqueline Mercado
Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
East Lansing, MI
Stimulating translational output in diamond blackfan anemia by targeted inhibition of NLKKathleen Sakamoto, MD, PhD
Stanford University
Stanford, CA
Kenneth Schwartz, MD
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Pascal Merritt
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, IN
Role of CXCR1 and CXCR2 in cell-cell aggregation in micro-vessels of sickle cell disease miceJaehyung Cho, PhD
University of Illinois College of Medicine
Chicago, IL
Rakesh Mehta, MD
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, IN
Mubarik Mohamed
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Columbus, OH
Immune checkpoint molecule expression in acute myeloid leukemiaNatarajan Muthusamy, DVM, PhD
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Columbus, OH
Sam Penza, MD
The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Columbus, OH
Chibuikem Nwizu
Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University
Providence, RI
Vesicle initiation of leukemia phenotype in normal adult bone marrowPeter Quesenberry, MD
Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University
Providence, RI
Matthew Quesenberry, MD
Lifespan Cancer Institute
Providence, RI
Oluwaseun "Seun" Orikogbo
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Pittsburgh, PA
Role of hemopexin in acute kidney injury of sickle cell disease during hemolytic crisisSolomon Ofori-Acquah, PhD
Vascular Medicine Institute
Pittsburgh, PA
Laura De Castro, MD, MHSc
Vascular Medicine Institute
Pittsburgh, PA
Derrick Ridley
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, GA
Elucidating the role of comorbidity in patients with mantle cell lymphomaJonathon Cohen, MD, MS
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, GA
Leon Bernal-Mizrachi, MD
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, GA
Anjelica Saulsberry
University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine
Memphis, TN
Transition readiness and cognition as predictors of optimal transition to adult care in patients with sickle cell diseaseJane Hankins, MD, MS
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis, TN
Maria del Pilar Aguinaga, PhD, DLM (ASCP)
Meharry Medical College
Nashville, TN
Kekoa Taparra, PhD
Mayo Clinic School of Medicine
Rochester, MN
Bleomycin use in the treatment of hodgkin lymphoma: changes over the yearsStephen Ansell, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Rahma Warsame, MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Ammanuel Taye
Howard University College of Medicine
Washington, D.C.
Orosomucoid as a biomarker for chronic kidney disease associated with sickle cell diseaseSergei Nekhai, PhD
Howard University College of Medicine
Washington, D.C.
Deepika Darbari, MD
Children's National Health System
Washington, D.C.
Ashley Thrower
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, NC
The effect of opioid analgesics on albuminuria in adult patients with sickle cell anemiaKenneth Ataga, MBBS, MD
UNC Division of Hematology/Oncology
Chapel Hill, NC
Georgette Dent, MD
UNC School of Medicine
Chapel Hill, NC
Vanessa Vides
Pennsylvania State College of Medicine
Hershey, PA
Correlative studies on a clinical trial of Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells in combination with ibrutinib for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia   Saar Gill, MD, PhD
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Stephen P. Hunger, MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA

 


The American Society of Hematology (ASH) (www.hematology.org) is the world’s largest professional society of hematologists dedicated to furthering the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting the blood. For 60 years, the Society has led the development of hematology as a discipline by promoting research, patient care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology. ASH publishes Blood (www.bloodjournal.org), the most cited peer-reviewed publication in the field, which is available weekly in print and online. In 2016, ASH launched Blood Advances (www.bloodadvances.org), an online, peer-reviewed open-access journal.

CONTACT:
Sara Khalaf, American Society of Hematology 
skhalaf@hematology.org; 202-552-4925

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