American Society of Hematology

2017 Friday Scientific Workshops

Please note, the following information is preliminary and subject to change.

The Friday Scientific Workshops are interactive discussions of the latest science developments in a particular field of hematology.

All registered ASH annual meeting attendees are welcome to attend these workshops. There is no additional fee to attend.

For questions about any of the Friday Scientific Workshops, please contact ASH Scientific Programs Specialist Nneka Iwuchukwu at niwuchukwu@hematology.org.

Friday Scientific Workshop on Hematology and Aging: Highlighting Novel Science and Promoting a Research Agenda

As the number of older patients with hematologic disorders dramatically increases, an enhanced focus on aging is needed. This workshop will discuss scientific findings related to aging and hematologic disorders and will span topics from bench to bedside. It will not be disease specific but will consider common themes related to aging in multiple settings. The workshop will include research on stem cells and aging, implications of aging on immune function (immunosenescence, immune reconstitution), thrombosis and aging, and correlates of frailty in hematology. Topics will cut across basic and clinical areas, as well as across disease types and clinical fields. Emphasis will be made on biologic mechanisms and implications for translation of clinical observations to pre-clinical models. The workshop will promote discussion of a research agenda and highlight opportunities for collaboration.

The target audience for this workshop is laboratory-based investigators and clinical researchers with an interest in aging and hematology. The expansive content, thematic focus, and interactive format will also appeal to a broader audience including students and trainees. This interactive workshop will feature brief didactic presentations followed by a short Q&A period.

Co-Chairs:

Tanya M. Wildes, MD
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO

Rebecca L. Olin, MD
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, CA

Moderators:

Stem Cells and Aging
Ashley E. Rosko, MD
The Ohio State University
ashley.rosko@osumc.edu

Aging, Inflammation, and Immune Function
Andrew Artz, MD
The University of Chicago
aartz@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu

Thrombosis and Aging
Mathew Rondina, MD
University of Utah
matthew.rondina@hsc.utah.edu

Clinical and Biologic Correlates of Frailty in Hematology
Heidi Klepin, MD
Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center
hklepin@wfubmc.edu

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the session moderators directly.

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Hemoglobin Concentrations for Defining Anemia in Individuals and Populations: Scientific Considerations and Overview of the WHO Program to Update Guidelines

An accurate case definition of anemia is crucial for both clinical and public health medicine – this includes clinical diagnosis, enabling patient care, and understanding the epidemiology of this problem to plan public health interventions. The current hemoglobin thresholds recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for men, women, young children, and pregnancy were proposed in 1968. However, concerns have been raised about the suitability of the current thresholds. WHO, in collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is reviewing the evidence underlying current thresholds and is undertaking a program of research to help ensure these thresholds are appropriate. The hematology community comprise the most important clinical stakeholder group and are the group with technical expertise to support this program; therefore, it is crucial for hematologists to be kept informed throughout the process and to have an opportunity to provide input. This workshop will present key scientific data underlying this process. It will also provide an open forum for hematologists to discuss the data and further research plans and to present and discuss new basic science and epidemiology surrounding anemia at the clinical and population health level.

The target audience for this workshop is laboratory-based investigators, clinicians, trainees interested in anemia, and individuals interested in the guideline development process at the WHO. The workshop will feature an overview of the topic and problem, followed by a series of didactic presentations and time for questions and answers. It will include a series of public health-related research presentations focusing on anemia as well as basic biology/laboratory-based presentations focusing on iron metabolism and erythroid biology as it relates to this question. Both data presented at the WHO meeting held in Geneva and supporting, basic data will be presented. After the presentations, the chairs will summarize the key points and allow further time for Q&A.

Workshop Objectives:

  • To outline the rationale and process for review and revision of the WHO hemoglobin thresholds
  • To identify and present key data which could provide the evidence that would be needed to define WHO hemoglobin thresholds
  • To present key scientific and experimental data which may inform the process by which hemoglobin thresholds should be defined by WHO
  • To deliver a highly interactive workshop, with a strong focus on collaboration between the hematology community and the WHO process
  • To provide feedback to WHO from the hematology community based on discussions and outcomes of the meeting

Co-Chairs:

Sant-Ryan Pasricha, MD, PhD
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
Melbourne, Australia
sant-rayn.pasricha@unimelb.edu.au

Dorine W. Swinkels
Radboud University Medical Centre
Nijmegen, Netherlands
dorine.swinkels@radboudumc.nl

If you would like to discuss a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact Dr. Sant-Ryan Pasricha or Dr. Dorine Swinkels directly.

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Inherited Hematopoietic Malignancies

Genetic contribution to the development of hematopoietic malignancies and the need for understanding predisposition genes, mutation distributions, and clinical phenotypes continues to be of great interest to the hematology community. This workshop will discuss the scientific advances in understanding the pathogenesis of cancer development in individuals and families with germline mutations and predisposition to bone marrow derived malignancies. The workshop will concentrate on known familial syndromes, including germline RUNX1, ETV6, ANKRD26, DDX41, GATA2, CEBPA, and other mutations that predispose to myeloid malignancies. The workshop will also discuss other well described syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni germline TP53 mutations as well as inherited lymphoid malignancies and pedigrees of high interest that have no known genetic predisposition alleles identified. The workshop will be conducted with an interactive format, encouraging input from audience members. Although the workshop’s main focus will be scientific in nature, discussions will also emphasize the clinical identification of individuals and families. This workshop will appeal to clinicians who have an interest or are studying inherited hematopoietic malignancies. It is designed to be very interactive to allow for maximal interaction and collaborations based on similar interests. The format will include didactic sessions with opportunities for Q&A.

Workshop Objectives

  • To discuss on-going research efforts in specific predisposition syndromes
  • To strengthen existing and to develop new collaborations in these diseases
  • To discuss interesting pedigrees that have tested negative for all known predisposition alleles to date and to combine pedigrees with similar phenotypes
  • To inform ASH members who are clinicians about these predisposition syndromes and provide contacts to facilitate testing and expand research
  • To discuss sequencing approaches, limitations, timing, and circumstances for variant evaluation

Chair:

Lucy Godley, MD, PhD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
lgodley@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu

Moderators:

Assessment of Germline Syndromes
Jun Yang, PhD
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
jun.yang@stjude.org

Alison Bertuch, MD, PhD
Texas Children's Hospital
abertuch@txch.org

New Insights in Predisposition Syndrome
Hamish Scott, PhD
University of Adelaide
hamish.scott@sa.gov.au

Marcin Wlodarski, MD
University of Freiburg
marcin.wlodarski@uniklinik-freiburg.de

Emerging New Syndromes
Mary Armanios, MD
Johns Hopkins University
marmani1@jhmi.edu

Prapti Patel, MD
University of Texas Southwestern
prapti.patel@utsouthwestern.edu

Penetrance and Combinations of Germline Variants
Elizabeth Griffiths, MD
Roswell Park Cancer Institute
elizabeth.griffiths@roswellpark.org

Carolyn Owen, MD
University of Calgary
carolyn.owen@albertahealthservices.ca

Reporting of Families and Variant Interpretation
Michael Walsh, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
walshm2@mskcc.org

Marshall Horwitz, MD, PhD
University of Washington
horwitz@u.washington.edu

Point-Counterpoint: Ethical Issues in Management of Germline Syndromes
Christopher Porter, MD
Emory University
chris.porter@emory.edu

Luke Maese, MD
University of Utah
luke.maese@hsc.utah.edu

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the session chair or moderators directly.

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Integrative Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Hematologic Malignancies

Integrative epidemiology addresses fundamental questions regarding the development and prevention of hematologic malignancies in populations. Epidemiologic research is of increasing importance in the era of large scale genomics and databases, where large numbers of patients must be accumulated to study subtle individual effects that translate into large population effects. Population studies can identify risk predictors for disease, progression, and outcome, which may have a substantial impact on clinical care. In addition, each of the major hematologic malignancies (leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma) can arise from precursor states, although the relative contribution of clonal hematopoiesis, monoclonal B-lymphocytosis, and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to the disease process and the host, clinical or molecular co-factors involved in transformation remains uncertain. This workshop will provide a unique forum for discussions around integrative clinical and molecular epidemiology of hematologic malignancies with emphasis on non-malignant precursor disease states and the factors associated with transformation to hematologic malignancy. This workshop is directed at national and international leaders interested in basic and clinical epidemiology as well as cancer prevention. The workshop will also appeal to trainees in public health and preventive medicine, clinical and translational epidemiology, and associated hematology outcomes research. The format of this workshop will include didactic sessions and focused panel discussions.

Workshop Objectives:

  • To provide a unique forum to discuss and present advances in the field of integrative clinical and molecular epidemiology of hematologic malignancies with a particular focus on non-malignant precursor disease states and the factors associated with transformation to hematologic malignancy for the development of targeted screening and prevention
  • To extend novel observations generated from epidemiology studies to translational studies with direct clinical relevance
  • To develop a roadmap and future directions that advance the study of epidemiology particularly including prevention strategies for lymphoid and myeloid malignancy
  • To establish a forum that enhances current collaborations, develops new collaborations, and provides opportunities for career development for trainees and junior investigators in epidemiology of hematologic malignancy

Co-Chairs:

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA

James M. Foran, MD
Mayo Clinic
Jacksonville, FL

Moderators:

New Findings From Population Studies of B-Cell Lymphoma and Leukemia
James Cerhan, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
cerhan.james@mayo.edu

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of Southern California
wcozen@usc.edu

Epidemiology of Myeloid Malignancy: Precursor States and Risk Factor Update
Lindsay Morton, PhD
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
mortonli@mail.nih.gov

James Foran, MD
Mayo Clinic, Florida
foran.james@mayo.edu

Understanding the Risk Pathway of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance to Myeloma: Contributions from Epidemiology
Ola Landgren, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
landgrec@mskcc.org

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of Southern California
wcozen@usc.edu

T- and NK-Cell Lymphoma/Leukemia: Challenges and Opportunities for Epidemiologic Research
Sophia Wang, PhD
City of Hope Cancer Etiology
sowang@coh.org

Amanda Termuhlen, MD
Keck School of Medicine
atermuhlen@memorialcare.org

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the session moderators directly.

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development

This workshop will examine the latest scientific findings in myeloid biology in a highly interactive environment that permits exchange of ideas among investigators. The workshop will focus on hematopoietic stem cell biology, leukemogenesis, cell signaling, transcription factors, epigenetic effects, and other topics related to myeloid biology. Each session leader will briefly summarize the current questions facing the field and then lead discussions on how best to answer those questions. New findings or novel techniques that provide insight into these questions will be an essential part of all discussions. The research presented at this workshop will also focus on the use of molecular biology and biochemistry tools, as well as animal models to address the core topics; it will not include any purely clinical, epidemiologic, or population based approaches.

This workshop is directed at laboratory-based investigators, but the broad-ranging content and highly interactive format is suitable for clinically oriented investigators in addition to young investigators, who will have the opportunity to interact directly with experts in the field. This workshop will feature brief didactic sessions followed by a short Q&A period.

Co-Chairs:

Ross L. Levine, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Leonard Zon, MD
Boston Children's Hospital
Boston, MA

Session Leaders:

Stem Cells
Patricia Ernst, PhD
University of Colorado
patricia.ernst@ucdenver.edu

Signaling and Developmental Hematopoiesis
David Traver, PhD
University of California
dtraver@ucsd.edu

Myeloid Malignancies
Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
bebert@partners.org

Transcription Factors/Epigenetics
Ulrich Steidl, MD, PhD
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
ulrich.steidl@einstein.yu.edu

New Investigators
Nancy Speck, PhD
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
nancyas@exchange.upenn.edu

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the session leaders directly.

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Tumor Immune Interactions in Lymphoid Malignancies

The area of immunotherapy in lymphoid malignancies has exploded in recent years. Multiple new immune therapies are in development in lymphoproliferative diseases, and this exciting progress has been due to an increased understanding of the tumor microenvironment and tumor-immune interactions in these diseases. This proliferation of scientific knowledge has led to multiple potential new treatments, including new immune checkpoint blockade therapies, novel T-cell approaches, agents targeting monocytes and macrophages, as well as new approaches inhibiting immune receptors and cytokine signaling. This workshop is directed at scientists, researchers, industry partners, and clinicians interested in immune approaches for the management of lymphoid malignancies. It will highlight novel basic science and translational immune research in lymphoid malignancies that are likely to translate to clinically relevant therapies, biomarkers, or correlative science in the near future. Potential future therapies or therapeutic targets that are likely to be important in lymphoid malignancies will also be highlighted.

The format of this workshop will be different from other sessions in that it will be strictly immune focused, highly interactive, and somewhat speculative (though based on science), with a strong focus on future translation to the clinic.

Workshop Objectives:

  • To highlight novel basic science and translational immune research in lymphoid malignancies that are likely to translate in the near future to clinically relevant therapies, biomarkers, or correlative science
  • To highlight potential future therapies or therapeutic targets that are likely to be important in lymphoid malignancies
  • To have scientists, translational researchers, and clinicians “hear it here first” when it comes to the next big thing in the management of lymphoid diseases

Co-Chairs:

Ronald Levy, MD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA
levy@stanford.edu

Stephen Ansell, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
ansell.stephen@mayo.edu

If you would like to suggest a topic or request a speaking slot at this workshop, please complete the Suggested Topic Form and email it directly to the session co-chairs.

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