American Society of Hematology

2017 Education Program

Please check back in July 2018 to view the preliminary schedule and program for the 60th ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition.

The Education Program will be held from Saturday, December 9, through Monday, December 11, with each session being offered twice. A question-and-answer period will occur at the end of each individual speaker presentation. Chapters based on these sessions will be published in Hematology 2017, the ASH Education Program.

Program Co-Chairs:

Laurie Sehn, MD,MPH, British Columbia Cancer Agency
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Adam Cuker, MD, MS, University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

Junior Faculty Development Education Session: Grant Funding: How to Get It and How to Keep It Going


Session Offered Once
Saturday, December 9, 2017, 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 2- B206

During this session, junior faculty will cover career development topics. The theme for this year’s session is grant funding.

Chair:

Rebecca L. Olin, MD
University of California – San Francisco
San Francisco, CA

Speakers:

Catherine C. Smith, MD
University of California (San Francisco)
San Francisco, CA
How to Get Your First Grant

Allison King, MD,MPH,PhD
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO
How to Change Your K to an R

Patrick Brown, MD
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, MD
How to Respond to the Pain of Reviewers' Critiques

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Sessions on Malignant Hematology

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: New Approaches in Management


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 1-2
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C1

Dr. Monika Brüggemann will review the different techniques used to measure minimal residual disease (MRD), focusing on the benefits and limitations of each method. She will highlight the importance of MRD as a prognostic factor in the setting of chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and immunotherapeutic drugs. Dr. Brüggemann will give an overview of MRD-driven therapeutic concepts and discuss whether and how MRD can be used as a decisive treatment tool.

Dr. Farhad Ravandi will review the recently reported clinical trials in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and discuss the pros and cons of the strategies reported, comparing the results obtained by various tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). He will examine the potential role of allogeneic stem cell transplant in the context of these TKI-based regimens and discuss how monitoring levels of BCR-ABL transcripts may potentially assist in making the decision to proceed to an allogeneic stem cell transplant in first remission.

Dr. Wendy Stock will review new treatment strategies for specific disease subsets in adult ALL, ranging from targeted TKIs to immune-based therapies, such as antibody conjugates, bispecific engaging antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. She will describe potential treatment algorithms as well as strategies for moving these agents, currently approved or being tested in the setting of relapsed disease, into the frontline treatment of ALL to eradicate MRD and improve treatment outcomes and survival.

Chair:

Wendy Stock, MD
The University of Chicago Medicine
Chicago, IL

Speakers:

Monika Brüggemann, MD
University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein
Kiel, Germany
Implications of Minimal Residual Disease in Adult ALL

Farhad Ravandi, MBBS
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX
Current Management of Philadelphia Chromosome Positive ALL and the Role of Stem Cell Transplantation

Wendy Stock, MD
The University of Chicago Medicine
Chicago, IL
How Should We Incorporate Novel Therapies Into the Management of ALL?

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia: How Can We Improve Upon “Standard” Therapy?


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C4
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C4

The characterization, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment options for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have evolved tremendously over the last decade. For the first time in years, new agents have been approved for the treatment of AML.

Dr. Eli Pappaemanuil will discuss the value of molecular and cytogenetic studies in AML patients in allowing us to better understand the nature of the disease, its prognosis, and the studies that are useful in assessing a patient.

Dr. Herve Dombret will discuss the use of intensive chemotherapy or hypomethylating agent therapy for AML. He will provide guidance regarding the choice of therapy and the factors that contribute to the decision, with a focus on the elderly.

Dr. Alexander Perl will discuss the approach to the treatment of AML in the era of targeted therapies. He will discuss the role of newly approved agents, agents currently under investigation, and the necessary diagnostic studies needed.

Chair:

Selina M. Luger, MD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

Speakers:

Elli Papaemmanuil, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Classification and Risk Assessment in AML: Integrating Cytogenetics and Molecular Profiling

Herve Dombret, MD
Hôpital Saint-Louis
Paris, France
How and When to Decide Between Epigenetic Therapy and Chemotherapy in Patients With AML

Alexander E. Perl, MD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Role of Targeted Therapy in the Management of Patients With AML

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Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Where Are We in the Current TKI Era?


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C1
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B312-B314

The survival rate for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who are treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) is now similar to that of the healthy population. However, recent reports of adverse events in patients who received TKI treatment have raised concerns about long-term sequelae of drugs that have been administered for decades. Improving the management of TKI-related adverse events and increasing the number of patients eligible for treatment-free remission will be essential to improving patients’ quality of life.

Dr. François-Xavier Mahon will review and summarize the recent studies related to TKI cessation in patients with deep molecular response, which have raised the idea of treatment-free remission. He will also discuss the awareness of CML curability.

Dr. Javid Moslehi will discuss the side effects of BCR-ABL1 TKI, focusing on cardiovascular toxicity. He will review what is currently known about the cardiovascular toxicities of TKI and discuss potential mechanisms underlying cardiovascular adverse events. Dr. Moslehi will provide the practical progress and recommendations for using TKI, illustrating the essential cooperation between hematologists and cardiologists.

Dr. Ravi Bhatia will review the concept of TKI resistance, focusing on leukemic stem cells. He will discuss new therapies for CML, with the goal of increasing the rate of treatment-free remission candidates. Dr. Bhatia will explain how to better target the leukemic stem cells and will review the current clinical trials which attempt to eliminate them.

Chair:

Francois-Xavier Mahon, MD, PhD
Bordeaux Segalen University
Bordeaux, France

Speakers:

Francois-Xavier Mahon, MD, PhD
Bordeaux Segalen University
Bordeaux, France
Treatment-Free Remission: Who, How, and Why?

Javid Moslehi, MD
Vanderbilt School of Medicine
Nashville, TN
TKI-Associated Cardiovascular Toxicity: What to Consider

Ravi Bhatia, MD
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, AL
Novel Approaches to Therapy in CML

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Controversies in Myeloma


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C4

The recent increase in approved, highly effective combination therapies for patients with multiple myeloma has led the way to redefining the goals of therapy. Recent meta-analyses show that minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity is associated with longer progression-free and overall survival in patients with multiple myeloma. With the use of modern combination therapy, more than 60 percent of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients achieve complete responses and MRD negativity. Emerging data indicate that between 90 and 95 percent of patients with early myeloma (smoldering myeloma) can achieve complete responses and MRD negativity. In this session, speakers will review current scientific evidence and provide clinical perspectives on the optimal time to start therapy, the goals of therapy, and the use of continuous and/or sequential therapy.

Dr. Ola Landgren will discuss the optimal time to start therapy in patients with plasma cell disorders. He will discuss data from treatment studies for patients with high-risk smoldering myeloma, and he will compare results with those obtained from patients treated for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Dr. Landgren will discuss models to define high-risk smoldering myeloma, and he will outline future directions for the field.

Dr. Faith Davies will discuss how highly effective combination therapies for patients with multiple myeloma have led the way to redefining the goals of therapy. She will review different methods for establishing deep treatment responses, and she will show how molecular assays, due to better sensitivity, can define deeper responses better than flow cytometry approaches. Dr. Davies will review data showing that deeper remissions translate into better clinical outcomes.

Dr. Heinz Ludwig will review and discuss data supporting continuous and sequential therapy in various clinical settings, including newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, early relapsed myeloma, and relapsed myeloma. He will also review data on continuous therapy versus sequential therapy in patients with high-risk and standard-risk multiple myeloma. Based on available data, Dr. Ludwig will address the need for long-term therapy with either multiple agents or a single agent, and for which patients.

Chair:

Ola Landgren, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

Speakers:

Ola Landgren, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
Should Smoldering Myeloma Be Treated?

Faith E. Davies, MD
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Little Rock, AR
Is Molecular Remission the Goal of Multiple Myeloma Therapy?

Heinz Ludwig, MD
Wilhelminen Hospital
Vienna, Austria
Continuous Versus Fixed Duration Therapy in Multiple Myeloma

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Dilemmas in Pediatric Hematologic Malignancy


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C4
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C1

Although the prognosis for many children and adolescents with leukemia has significantly improved over the last several decades, important care challenges remain. This session will provide an overview on the diagnosis and management of patients with syndromes associated with increased susceptibility to leukemia. Treatment-related complications will be covered, in addition to current approaches to incorporating novel therapies in the treatment of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

Dr. Sharon Savage will review classic syndromes and more recently described entities associated with increased susceptibility to leukemia. She will discuss in whom a work-up of an inherited predisposition to leukemia should be undertaken, the major clinical findings in these syndromes, and the challenges in managing acute leukemia, including stem cell transplant, in these patients.

Dr. Rachael Hough will describe treatment-related complications in childhood ALL, focusing on the presentation, pathogenesis, risk factors, and management of the most common life-threatening toxicities. She will also provide an update on research related to prevention of these complications.

Dr. Lewis Silverman will provide an overview of non-chemotherapeutic approaches currently being tested in childhood ALL. This includes targeted therapies, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and immunotherapies, such as antibodies and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Dr. Silverman will review recently conducted clinical trials and ongoing efforts to incorporate these novel therapies into the upfront treatment for children and adolescents with ALL.

Chair:

Lewis B. Silverman, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

Speakers:

Sharon A. Savage, MD
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD
Premalignant Pediatric Hematologic Disorders: When to Treat and How

Rachael Hough, MD, BMBS, FRCPath
University College London Hospital
London, United Kingdom
Crisis Management in the Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: Putting Right What Can Go Wrong (Emergency Complications of Disease and Treatment)

Lewis B. Silverman, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Incorporation of Non-Chemotherapeutic Agents in Pediatric Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

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Evolving Strategies in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 1-2
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C4

Progress in understanding the biology of aggressive B-cell lymphoma has paved the way for the testing of novel agents, which has led to many significant clinical advances. As therapies continue to evolve, optimal strategies that are not only informed by clinical and pathologic characteristics but also by tumor biologic factors are emerging.

Dr. Andrew Davies will review controversies in the frontline therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and discuss which patients should receive tailored therapy. He will summarize the role of cell of origin and tumor biologic factors in the prognosis of newly diagnosed patients and discuss whether they should affect selection of optimal therapy.

Dr. Kieron Dunleavy will discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular biology of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and their clinical impact. He will summarize management controversies, including the optimal management of adolescent primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and mediastinal grey zone lymphoma.

Dr. Peter Martin will summarize recent advances in mantle cell lymphoma biology and therapeutics and discuss optimal management for challenging patients. He will discuss whether we have reached an era in which transplantation should be reserved for selected cases given the promising results with novel approaches.

Chair:

Kieron Dunleavy, MD
George Washington University
Washington, DC

Speakers:

Andrew Davies, PhD
University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
Southampton, United Kingdom
Tailoring Frontline Therapy in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Who Should We Treat Differently?

Kieron Dunleavy, MD
George Washington University
Washington, DC
Primary Mediastinal B Cell Lymphoma: Biology and Evolving Therapeutic Strategies

Peter Martin, FRCPC, MD, MS
Weill Cornell Medical College
New York, NY
Optimizing Therapy in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

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Hodgkin Lymphoma: New Insights and New Approaches


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3

Tremendous progress in our understanding of the biology of both classical and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma has resulted in significant efforts to rapidly translate this knowledge into new prognostic and therapeutic approaches. This session will focus on recent discoveries, potential advantages and pitfalls of novel therapies, and approaching nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma as a distinct disease.

Dr. Margaret Shipp will summarize recent advances in the understanding of Hodgkin lymphoma biology and explain how these discoveries open up potential avenues for developmental therapeutics. She will discuss how complex genetic alterations in Reed Sternberg cells lead to aberrant expression of PDL1, PDL2, beta-2 microglobulin, and major histocompatibility complex class I/II, as well as immune evasion and altered responsiveness to standard therapies and targeted agents.  

Dr. Nancy Bartlett will discuss the role of brentuximab vedotin and the PD-1 inhibitors nivolumab and pembrolizumab in the treatment of multiple relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. She will summarize recent results and current trials incorporating these agents into earlier lines of therapy and examine the potential advantages and disadvantages of new combinations. Dr. Bartlett will provide a brief review of novel agents in development, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, bispecific antibodies, and kinase inhibitors. 

Dr. Dennis Eichenauer will describe the unique natural history and biology of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and address controversies and challenges in the management of both newly diagnosed and relapsed disease. He will emphasize why approaches used in classical Hodgkin lymphoma may not always represent the optimal strategy for treating this distinct subtype of lymphoma.

Chair:

Nancy L. Bartlett, MD
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO

Speakers:

Margaret A. Shipp, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Insights Into Hodgkin Lymphoma Biology: Implications for Prognosis and Novel Therapeutics

Nancy L. Bartlett, MD
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO
Emerging Role of Novel Therapies in Hodgkin Lymphoma: Proceed With Caution

Dennis A. Eichenauer
University of Cologne
Cologne, Germany
Nodular Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Unique Disease Deserving Unique Management

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Individualizing Therapy in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C1
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3

The management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been revolutionized by the recent approval of highly effective, well-tolerated novel agents and by an improved understanding of CLL genomics. This session will review how CLL genomics and clonal evolution affect prognosis and treatment. Recent advances in frontline CLL therapy will be reviewed, including strategies for how to integrate novel agents. Lastly, the speakers will discuss approaches to the sequence of administration of novel agents and the optimization of combination regimens for CLL.

Dr. Gianluca Gaidano will discuss how major advances in the understanding of CLL genomics have led to the clarification of the mutational landscape of the disease and of its clonal evolution over time. He will review how such molecular knowledge has expanded the availability of prognostic and predictive biomarkers that can be used for patient counseling, treatment tailoring, and clinical trial design. 

Dr. Kirsten Fischer will summarize recent clinical advances in frontline therapy of CLL. She will discuss the opportunities and challenges associated with the advent of targeted therapies and will provide recommendations on how to optimize frontline therapy based on clinical and biological factors.

Dr. Matthew Davids will review recent data on the approved novel agents for CLL, including those targeting the B-cell receptor kinases, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and CD20. He will discuss strategies for sequencing novel agent monotherapy in different CLL patient populations and highlight some of the promising combination regimens incorporating novel agents that are currently under investigation.

Chair:

Matthew S. Davids, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA

Speakers:

Gianluca Gaidano, MD, PhD
University of Eastern Piedmont
Novara, Italy
The Mutational Landscape of CLL and Its Impact on Prognosis and Treatment

Kirsten Fischer, MD
University Hospital Cologne
Cologne, Germany
Optimizing Frontline Therapy of CLL Based on Clinical and Biological Factors

Matthew S. Davids, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
How Should We Sequence and Combine Novel Therapies in CLL?

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Indolent Lymphoma: How Understanding Disease Biology Is Influencing Clinical Decision-Making


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3
Sunday, December 10, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 3-4

The management of indolent lymphoma remains a mixture of art and science. Biologic discoveries are uncovering the underlying pathogenesis of these diseases and beginning to influence the clinical decision making for individual patients. This session will focus on the management of these diseases as it relates to recent biologic advances. 

Dr. Brad Kahl will review follicular lymphoma, focusing on risk stratification. Follicular lymphoma is an incredibly heterogeneous disease, and decision making for individual patients is challenging. Dr. Kahl will review available tools to aid in patient management algorithms. He will also summarize outcomes with contemporary treatments and discuss when alternative strategies, such as stem cell transplantation, should be considered.

Dr. Jorge Castillo will review recent biologic discoveries into the underlying pathogenesis of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma such as MYD88 and CXCR4 mutations and discuss how these mutations affect treatment response to targeted agents such as Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors. He will review the management of these challenging disorders, focusing on how to integrate novel targeted agents into treatment algorithms where standard agents are also effective. 

Dr. Catherine Thieblemont will discuss both nodal and splenic marginal zone lymphoma. Each entity is relatively rare, creating challenges for biologic discovery and for conducting clinical trials. Single agent rituximab appears uniquely effective in splenic marginal zone lymphoma and is challenging the role of splenectomy. Ibrutinib appears to have impressive activity in nodal marginal zone lymphoma and is a newly available treatment option. Dr. Thieblemont will review the management of these two disorders.

Chair:

Brad S. Kahl, MD
Washington University
St. Louis, MO

Speakers:

Brad S. Kahl, MD
Washington University
St. Louis, MO
Follicular Lymphoma: Are We Ready for a Risk-Adapted Approach?

Jorge J. Castillo, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Biology and Management of Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

Catherine Thieblemont, MD, PhD
Hopital Saint-Louis
Paris, France
Update on Nodal and Primary Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

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Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Understanding the Current Treatment Landscape


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 3-4
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 3-4

The past few years have ushered in major advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The clinical relevance of these mutations is an evolving story. At the same time, there is an increasing availability of new agents and approaches under investigation for the treatment of these disorders. This session will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathobiology of MDS and their impact on risk stratification and outcomes. Speakers will also discuss current therapies for MDS, including novel therapeutic approaches.

Dr. R. Coleman Lindsley will review current knowledge of the gene mutations involved in the molecular pathogenesis of MDS and the clinical implications of these mutations. He will discuss the prognostic relevance of these mutations and the emerging data on how mutational profiling may predict therapeutic outcome in MDS, including outcome following intensive approaches such as allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Dr. Aristoteles Giagounidis will provide an overview of the approach to management of MDS. He will include contemporary approaches to the treatment of lower-risk MDS, including recent data on the use of thrombopoietin mimetics, lenalidomide, and novel agents to ameliorate anemia.

Dr. Olatoyosi Odenike will review treatment approaches for higher-risk MDS. She will discuss novel strategies under investigation in this context, including novel formulations of hypomethylating agents, novel epigenetic modulators, and other targeted therapeutic approaches and combinations currently under clinical investigation.

Chair:

Olatoyosi Odenike, MBBS
The University of Chicago Medicine
Chicago, IL

Speakers:

R. Coleman Lindsley, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
Uncoding the Genetic Heterogeneity of MDS

Aristoteles Giagounidis, MD
Marien Hospital Düsseldorf
Düsseldorf, Germany
Current Treatment Algorithm for the Management of MDS

Olatoyosi Odenike, MBBS
The University of Chicago Medicine
Chicago, IL
Incorporating Novel Approaches in the Management of MDS Beyond Hypomethylating Agents

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Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: New Insights in the Current Treatment Paradigm


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 3- Georgia BR 1-3
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 3-4

There have been tremendous advances in the field of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) since the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation 12 years ago. This breakthrough has generated refinements in diagnostic criteria and risk assessment and has led to the development of novel therapies. This session will focus on a personalized approach to patients with MPN.

Dr. Antony Green will review the latest information on the characterization of the molecular landscape of MPN. In particular, he will describe how the unique ordered acquisition of driver mutations and mutations in other genes involved in hematopoietic cell regulation eventually affect the phenotype and fate of the disease. Dr. Green will briefly discuss how the understanding of mutation order might potentially affect therapeutic approach.

Dr. Alessandro Vannucchi will summarize current criteria for managing patients with polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, using risk stratification criteria and adapting treatment accordingly. He will discuss results of the latest clinical trials that form the fundamental therapy as well as the use of novel drugs in selected patient categories.

Dr. Claire Harrison will discuss challenges in managing patients with myelofibrosis using the approved JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib, as well as how this drug is best positioned in a therapeutic algorithm that includes conventional agents, a watch-and-wait approach, and stem cell transplantation. She will review the results of clinical trials with other JAK2 inhibitors and discuss novel drugs in early clinical development.

Chair:

Alessandro M. Vannucchi, MD
University of Florence
Florence, Italy

Speakers:

Anthony R. Green, PhD
University of Cambridge
Cambridge, United Kingdom
Myeloproliferative Neoplasms – From Origins to Outcomes

Alessandro M. Vannucchi, MD
University of Florence
Florence, Italy
What Are the Current Treatment Approaches for Patients With Polycythemia Vera and Essential Thrombocythemia?

Claire N. Harrison, BMBCh, DM
Guys and St. Thomas
London, United Kingdom
Current Treatment Algorithm for the Management of Patients With Myelofibrosis, JAK Inhibitors, and Beyond

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Novel Therapeutics in Myeloma


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3

Outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma have significantly improved in the recent century, mainly due to the introduction of the first generation of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs as part of firstline therapy. The second generation of these drug classes are emerging as rescue therapy for early relapses and immune-based approaches, as well as new classes of agents that are currently in clinical trials for subsequent relapses. In this session, current and novel strategies of therapy will be reviewed for newly diagnosed and relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients.

Dr. Mari­a-Victoria Mateos will summarize the current treatment algorithm for newly diagnosed myeloma patients, discussing the different options of induction, consolidation, and/or maintenance therapy, including the role of autologous stem cell transplantation.

Dr. Pieter Sonneveld will discuss the management of relapsed or refractory myeloma patients by presenting all new combinations available for this population and putting them in perspective.

Dr. Shaji Kumar will review the new classes of agents currently in clinical trials for treatment of myeloma, specifically focusing on the new immune-based approaches, targeted agents, and epigenetic modulators. He will discuss the different immune therapies that are being developed, including monoclonal antibodies and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, as well as other novel immune platforms. Dr. Kumar will discuss the potential targets identified by genomic studies and agents that are being explored in the context of specific plasma cell abnormalities, as well as ongoing trials of target-based treatment assignment.

Chair:

Maria-Victoria Mateos, MD, PhD
University Hospital of Salamanca
Salamanca, Spain

Speakers:

Maria-Victoria Mateos, MD, PhD
University Hospital of Salamanca
Salamanca, Spain
Management of Multiple Myeloma in the Newly Diagnosed Patient

Pieter Sonneveld, MD, PhD
Erasmus Medical Center
Rotterdam, Netherlands
Management of Multiple Myeloma in the Relapsed/Refractory Patient

Shaji K. Kumar, MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Emerging Options in Multiple Myeloma: Targeted, Immune, and Epigenetic Therapies

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The Challenge of Primary and Secondary Central Nervous System Lymphoma


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 3- Georgia BR 1-3

Primary and secondary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas are aggressive brain tumors that pose an immense challenge to diagnose, to define in terms of molecular pathogenesis, as well as to effectively treat.  During the past ten years improvements in survival have been achieved with the implementation of anti-CD20 immunotherapy and optimization of dose-intensive consolidation strategies. Nevertheless, a plateau has likely been achieved with existing genotoxic strategies, and an emerging set of targeted therapeutic and immunotherapeutic strategies have recently been evaluated and show activity in relapsed disease. 

Dr. James Rubenstein will review the biology of primary and secondary CNS lymphoma, the challenges in diagnosis and in radiographic assessment, tumor genetics, and pro-survival signaling pathways. He will also review the results of recent early phase investigations of novel targeted agents and immunotherapeutic strategies in these diseases and discuss their limitations and potential in future investigations.

Dr. Andres Ferrari will discuss the standard of care strategies for primary CNS lymphoma, dose-intensive consolidation strategies including autologous stem cell transplant, the pros and cons of current agents, the problem of the blood-brain barrier and treatment related toxicity, results from recent and ongoing trials, and how to incorporate novel agents as part of first-line treatment.

Dr. Kerry Savage will review the clinical challenge of CNS relapse of systemic lymphoma. The CNS IPI risk model that identifies patients at high risk for CNS lymphoma, as well as emerging biomarkers of risk and differential therapeutic strategies based on brain compartment and age will be discussed. Novel therapeutic strategies to explore in the prophylaxis of CNS relapse will also be reviewed.

Chair:

James L. Rubenstein, MD, PhD
University of California – San Francisco
San Francisco, CA

Speakers:

James L. Rubenstein, MD, PhD
University of California – San Francisco
San Francisco, CA
Biology of CNS Lymphoma and the Potential of Novel Agents

Andrés J M Ferreri, MD
IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute
Milan, Italy
Therapy of Primary CNS Lymphoma: Role of Intensity, Radiation, and Novel Agents

Kerry J. Savage, MD, MSc
British Columbia Cancer Agency
Vancouver, BC, Canada
CNS Prophylaxis for Lymphoma: Who, What, and When?

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The Expanding Role of Immunotherapy in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3
Sunday, December 10, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 1- Hall C2-C3

Areas under active investigation in the field of immunotherapy for lymphoma include vaccines enhancing antigen processing and presentation efficacy, co-stimulation agonists, adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells, and suppression of T cell regulatory pathways. This session will focus on the biology of the microenvironment, as well as immunomodulators, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and cell therapy for lymphoma.

Dr. Karin Tarte will discuss the heterogeneity, origin, and function of the tumor microenvironment in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), including adaptive and innate immunity as well as cancer-associated fibroblasts. She will review how these various cell subsets may favor or restrain malignant cell growth. Dr. Tarte will also highlight the implications for lymphomagenesis and treatment design.

Dr. Stephen Ansell will review immunological barriers to an effective antitumor immune response in lymphoma. He will discuss clinical results with immune modulation, including studies using immune checkpoint blockade and agonistic monoclonal antibodies. Dr. Ansell will also discuss preliminary results with combination immunological approaches.

Dr. Catherine Bollard will discuss T-cell therapies for lymphomas beyond chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, including T cells specific for tumor-associated and viral antigens. She will also discuss mechanisms to render T cells resistant to suppressive elements in the tumor microenvironment.

Chair:

Stephen M. Ansell, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN

Speakers:

Karin Tarte, PhD
CHU Rennes
Rennes, France
Role of the Microenvironment Across Histological Subtypes of NHL

Stephen M. Ansell, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Harnessing the Power of the Immune System in NHL: Immunomodulators, Checkpoint Inhibitors, and Beyond

Catherine M. Bollard, MD
Children's National Health System
Washington, DC
Cellular Immunotherapy for NHL

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When Graft Versus Tumor Fails: The Biology and Treatment of Relapse After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation


Session Offered Twice
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg C- Lvl 3- Georgia BR 1-3

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is a potentially curative therapy for many patients with a hematologic malignancy. However, relapse remains the leading cause of treatment failure, and optimal treatment for relapse after alloHCT is still poorly defined. Historically, besides donor lymphocytes infusion, limited therapeutic options have been available for these patients, and they have typically faced very poor prognoses. However, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of disease relapse after alloHCT – and the introduction of several novel targeted drugs and cellular therapies that can be safely used after alloHCT – may improve the outcome of these patients.

Dr. Frederik Falkenburg will provide a modern vision of the so-called immune-mediated graft versus tumor effect, and he will summarize the latest developments related to the understanding of the biology of disease relapse after alloHCT.

Dr. Robert Soiffer will describe the bases for a rational deployment of post-transplant therapies using pharmacologic agents. He will also summarize the available research evidence, including safety and efficacy, related to the use of some targeted drugs after alloHCT to prevent or treat disease recurrence.

Dr. Alan Wayne will focus on the use of cellular therapies to prevent or treat disease relapse after alloHCT. He will provide an update on the latest results and address the different challenges encountered in this domain.

Chair:

Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD
Saint Antoine Hospital
Paris, France

Speakers:

J.H. Frederik Falkenburg, MD, PhD
Leiden University Medical Center
Leiden, Netherlands
Graft Versus Tumor Effects and Why People Relapse

Robert J. Soiffer, MD
Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.
Boston, MA
Drugs to Prevent and Treat Relapse Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

Alan S. Wayne, MD
Children's Hospital Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA
Cells to Prevent and Treat Relapse Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

Sessions on Non-Malignant Hematology

Bone Marrow Failure: Acquired


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B312-B314
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B302-B303

It has been known that the germline mutations leading to the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS) are associated with cancer predisposition in those patients. The discovery of somatic mutations in acquired bone marrow failure conditions, such as aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), leukemia, and even solid tumors, and in the IBMFS, has added further clinical significance to these genes.

Dr. Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski will define somatic mutations in aplastic anemia and MDS and their clinical implications in the management of these patients. His presentation will focus on biological aspects of clonal architecture, its dynamics in individual disease, and the impact on clinical features. He will provide a practical guide as to how to evaluate the results of mutational testing as well as the caveats and shortcomings of the currently applied analytic tools.

Dr. Adrianna Vlachos will discuss the discovery of ribosomal protein (RP) mutations and deletions in the pathogenesis of MDS, leukemia, and solid tumors. Aberrations in RP expression acting by overexpression as oncogenes or by haploinsufficiency as possible tumor suppressors may serve as heretofore underappreciated drivers of malignancy. Both over- and underexpression of RPs suggest these as potential therapeutic targets.

Dr. Christopher Park will discuss the changes that occur in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells as well as the bone microenvironment with age and the contribution of these changes to the development of bone marrow failure, especially MDS. Given the increasing frequency of clonal hematopoiesis with age, the potential role of somatic mutations in hematopoietic aging is also being investigated.

Chair:

Adrianna Vlachos, MD
Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Cohen Children's Medical Center, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine
Manhasset, NY

Speakers:

Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski, MD, PhD
Taussig Cancer Center
Cleveland, OH
Clinical Implications of Somatic Mutations in Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in the Genomics Age

Adrianna Vlachos, MD
Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Cohen Children's Medical Center, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine
Manhasset, NY
Acquired Ribosomopathies, Red Cell Failure, and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Christopher Y. Park, MD, PhD
New York University School of Medicine
New York, NY
Hematopoiesis, Aging, and Bone Marrow Failure

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Bone Marrow Failure: Inherited


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B312-B314
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B302-B303

Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are now being recognized within groups of patients who present with apparently acquired aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and some solid tumors. This session will discuss recent approaches to the diagnosis and management of the inherited disorders, including genomics, transplant considerations, and new modalities of non-transplant treatment.

Dr. Jane Churpek will present a modern, practical approach for knowing when and how to utilize both old and new tools in the clinical diagnosis of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.  She will review how the increasing use of genomics is extending our understanding of the phenotypic spectra and prevalence of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes in both children and adults.

Dr. Blanche Alter will describe characteristics of patients with inherited bone marrow syndromes which are present from birth or develop with age, and which may be affected by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, both improved as well as made worse. These include non-hematologic/oncologic aspects as well as hematologic/oncologic features.

Dr. Rodrigo Calado will discuss the use of growth factors, growth factor agonists, and sex hormones for the treatment of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes. He will also talk about how the understanding of the molecular basis of marrow failure along with the derivation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells may help identify target pathways and novel drugs.

Chair:

Blanche P. Alter, MD
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Rockville, MD

Speakers:

Jane Churpek, MD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Old and New Tools in the Clinical Diagnosis of Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

Blanche P. Alter, MD
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Rockville, MD
Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes: Considerations Pre- and Post-Transplant

Rodrigo T. Calado, MD, PhD
University of São Paulo
Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
Treatment of Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Beyond Transplant

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Common Clinical Questions in Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolism


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B308-B309
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B304-B305

Cancer-associated thrombosis continues to challenge doctors and burden patients. Patients with cancer-associated deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism need anticoagulation; however, specific questions on the choice of anticoagulation and the duration of treatment are still unanswered. This session will address a number of topics that require clarification or are discussed controversially.

Dr. Marcello Di Nisio will discuss the present anticoagulant treatment recommendations for incidental, proximal deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. He will specifically focus on the extension of pulmonary emboli and the different approaches in extensive and subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Dr. Di Nisio will also discuss the present knowledge on anticoagulation in patients with distal deep vein thrombosis and splanchnic vein thrombosis, the latter of which is frequently found in patients with cancer in the abdominal region, such as pancreatic carcinoma.

Dr. Agnes Lee will review the published literature and real world data on anticoagulant therapy use in patients with cancer-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE), the risks and risk factors of recurrent thrombosis and bleeding, the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation, and patient preference and values regarding long-term anticoagulation. Consensus guidelines generally suggest continuing anticoagulation in patients with ongoing risk factors for recurrent thrombosis with periodic reassessment of the risks and benefits. Dr. Lee will conclude with a pragmatic approach on how to tailor anticoagulant therapy in patients with cancer-associated VTE.

Dr. Ingrid Pabinger will discuss the current knowledge on the use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) for prevention and treatment of cancer-associated VTE. Although patients with cancer have been among those treated with DOACs in pivotal trials, the numbers have been small and the patients might not be comparable to the majority of patients with cancer-associated thrombosis. Presently, interventional studies are ongoing; however, final data are still missing from these trials specifically designed for thrombosis in cancer patients. As prevention of deep vein thrombosis would be desirable for patients with cancer who are at high risk of thrombosis, and DOACs might be safe and easy to use, this aspect needs to be investigated in specific trials.

Chair:

Ingrid Pabinger, MD
Medical University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria

Speakers:

Marc Carrier, MD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Ottawa, ON, Canada
[REPLACEMENT SPEAKER] Incidental VTE: Is Anticoagulation Indicated?

Agnes Y.Y. Lee, MD
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC, Canada
When Can We Stop Anticoagulation in Patients With Cancer-Associated Thrombosis?

Ingrid Pabinger, MD
Medical University of Vienna
Vienna, Austria
Direct Oral Anticoagulants: Now Also for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer-Associated VTE?

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Common Hematologic Consults in Pregnancy


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B308-B309
Sunday, December 10, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 2- B206

Normal pregnancy is associated with physiologic changes that affect the hematologic system. The need to focus on the wellbeing of both the mother and baby makes the management of hematologic problems during this time more complex. This session will focus on common reasons for hematologic consultation during pregnancy, including thrombocytopenia, anemia secondary to iron deficiency, and venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Dr. Douglas Cines will provide an update on assessment of the most common causes of thrombocytopenia encountered during pregnancy based on trimester of onset and associated clinical features at presentation. Emphasis will be placed on difficult-to-treat patients with immune thrombocytopenia and new approaches used to diagnose and manage women with thrombotic microangiopathies.

Dr. Christian Breymann will review the primary causes of pregnancy-associated anemia, diagnostic tools for the detection of iron deficiency and anemia during pregnancy, and fetal and maternal consequences of these conditions. Differences between the principles of prevention of iron deficiency and treatment of manifest anemia will be discussed, along with the various types of available iron therapy. There will be a focus on recent data on safe and effective use of intravenous iron preparations.

Dr. Leslie Skeith will summarize available evidence and highlight areas of uncertainty in the prevention of VTE during pregnancy and the postpartum period, as well as anticoagulant management around the time of delivery. She will use the concept of a risk threshold to provide recommendations for the prevention of VTE in pregnant women with thrombophilias and those with prior venous thrombosis.

Chair:

Shannon Marie Bates, MD
McMaster University
Hamilton, Canada

Mark Crowther, MD
St. Joseph's Hospital
Hamilton, ON, Canada

Speakers:

Douglas B. Cines, MD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy: Evaluation and Management

Christian Breymann, MD
Zürich, CHE
Iron-Deficiency in Pregnancy: Clinical Implications and Management

Mark Crowther, MD
St. Joseph's Hospital
Hamilton, ON, Canada
[REPLACEMENT SPEAKER] Preventing Venous Thromboembolism during Pregnancy and Postpartum: Crossing the Threshold

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Congenital and Acquired Neutropenia


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 2- B211-B212
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B304-B305

Neutropenia is a frequent, challenging clinical event encountered by both adult and pediatric hematologists and hematopathologists. Accurate diagnosis and effective management is sometimes delayed, which may be problematic because the causes can be life-threatening. This session will summarize new disease entities, new mechanisms that illuminate broader hematologic issues, and new clinical strategies to manage these diverse patients.

Dr. Seth Corey will summarize newly discovered congenital causes for severe or moderate neutropenia and review the controversies in their diagnosis and management, with particular focus on their predisposition to malignant transformation.  

Dr. Thomas Loughran will review the diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis of large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia, with a particular focus on the overlap of LGL leukemia and rheumatoid arthritis, especially Felty syndrome. Current understanding of the mechanisms of neutropenia in rheumatoid arthritis will be discussed. Finally, treatment indications and therapeutic recommendations will be outlined.

Dr. Brian Curtis will summarize the proposed mechanisms, incidence, and risk factors of drug-induced neutropenia (DIN). He will list the drugs most commonly associated with DIN and briefly review the utility of laboratory testing for drug-dependent antibodies in suspected cases of DIN.

Chair:

Seth Corey, MD
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA

Speakers:

Seth Corey, MD
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA
New Diseases, New Mechanisms, and New Therapies in Congenital Neutropenia

Thomas P Loughran Jr., MD
University of Virginia Cancer Center
Charlottesville, VA
Chronic Neutropenia in Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Brian R. Curtis, PhD
BloodCenter of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI
Drug-Induced Neutropenia

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Controversies in Venous Thromboembolism: To Treat or Not to Treat


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B308-B309
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B304-B305

Unlike proximal deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, which have been extensively studied and for which management is well standardized, much less is known about the optimal management of superficial vein thrombosis, distal deep vein thrombosis, and subsegmental pulmonary embolism. This session will focus on establishing the risk-benefit ratio of anticoagulant therapy for these challenging venous thrombotic complications.

Dr. Jan Beyer-Westendorf will discuss recent clinical advances in the management of superficial vein thrombosis, which is still poorly standardized and remains controversial. He will summarize the available evidence and aim to provide practical guidance based on a clinical decision pathway.

Dr. Marc Righini will discuss new evidence regarding the risk-benefit ratio of anticoagulant therapy in the management of distal deep vein thrombosis. He will review the conclusions of recently published clinical trials and help to develop a management strategy for this patient population.

Dr. Marc Carrier will discuss the management of subsegmental pulmonary embolism, a clinical challenge that is becoming increasingly common since the introduction of multirow detector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. He will summarize the available evidence, discuss optimal management strategies, and highlight areas of uncertainty.

Chair:

Marc Carrier, MD
University of Ottawa
Ottawa, Canada

Speakers:

Jan Beyer-Westendorf, MD
University Hospital ’’Carl Gustav Carus’’ Dresden
Dresden, Germany
Superficial Vein Thrombosis

Marc Righini, MD
Geneva University Hospital
Geneva, Switzerland
Distal Deep Vein Thrombosis

Marc Carrier, MD
University of Ottawa
Ottawa, Canada
Subsegmental Pulmonary Embolism

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Emerging Issues in Clinical Care in Thalassemia


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 2- B207-B208
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg A- Lvl 4- Marcus Aud.

An increased understanding of the molecular and pathogenic factors that govern the thalassemia pathophysiology support the development of new therapeutic approaches to thalassemia care.

Dr. Ali Taher will summarize recent advances in iron overload and iron chelation. Several modalities are currently available for the diagnosis and monitoring of iron overload in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT) and non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT), allowing a better understanding of the timing of accumulation in different organs and at different rates. Dr. Taher will provide recommendations on how to tailor the chelation regimen to a single patient. New oral iron chelator formulation will be discussed in addition to new modalities to remove the excess of body iron.

Dr. Antonio Piga will focus on the impact of bone disease and pain on the quality of life of thalassemia patients, and he will provide recommendations for prevention and treatment of early bone loss. Considering the long-term survival of thalassemia patients, all the new strategies for treating osteopenia and osteoporosis, as well as the underlying causes, must be evaluated.

Dr. Maria Domenica Cappellini will discuss the new therapeutic targets in TDT and NTDT that are in pre-clinical and clinical experimental phases and that mainly address ineffective erythropoiesis. These therapeutic targets include the activin receptor ligand trap molecules and JAK2 inhibitors. Gene therapy and genome editing will also be discussed.

Chair:

Maria Domenica Cappellini, MD
Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico
Milan, Italy

Speakers:

Ali Taher, MD,PhD,FRCP
American University of Beirut Medical Center
Beirut, Lebanon
Iron Overload in Thalassemia: Different Organs at Different Rates

Antonio G. Piga, MD
University of Turin
Turin, Torino, Italy
The Impact of Bone Disease and Pain in Thalassemia

Maria Domenica Cappellini, MD
Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Policlinico Milano - University of Milan
Milan, Italy
New Therapeutic Targets in Transfusion-Dependent and Non-Transfusion-Dependent Thalassemia

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It All Starts Here: Disorders of Primary Hemostasis


Session Offered Twice
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B308-B309
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B312-B314

Disorders of primary hemostasis result in mucocutaneous hemorrhage and immediate bleeding following trauma and surgery. Until recently, many of these disorders were diagnostically challenging given limitations in testing. New diagnostic methods may enhance our ability to understand and identify these disorders. Additionally, new approaches and targeted therapies may increase positive outcomes for patients.

Dr. Veronica Flood will discuss advances in the diagnosis and treatment of von Willebrand disease (VWD). The use of bleeding assessment tools to quantify historical bleeding symptoms as well as the use of new assays of von Willebrand factor function will be highlighted in terms of their effect on diagnosing VWD. New therapeutic options and evidence for specific treatment strategies will also be covered.

Dr. Patrizia Noris will summarize the most recent advances in understanding hereditary thrombocytopenias, which have been made possible by the large-scale application of next generation sequencing techniques. She will illustrate that the study of large series of patients has revealed that hereditary thrombocytopenias have different degrees of clinical complexity and a great variation in prognosis. In particular, Dr. Noris will discuss forms predisposing to additional illnesses along with the more appropriate diagnostic approach, follow-up, and treatment.

Dr. Cindy Neunert will provide an overview of recent advances in the management of patients with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia. The indications for treatment and standard first-line therapies will be covered. Dr. Neunert will summarize areas of controversy and existing evidence for corticosteroid selection and augmented treatment.

Chair:

Cindy Neunert, MD
Columbia University
New York, NY

Speakers:

Veronica H. Flood, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI
Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of von Willebrand Disease

Patrizia Noris, MD
IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation; University of Pavia
Pavia, Italy
Hereditary Thrombocytopenias: A Growing List of Disorders

Cindy Neunert, MD
Columbia University
New York, NY
Management of Newly Diagnosed Immune Thrombocytopenia: Can We Change Outcomes?

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Lessons Learned From Quality Improvement Initiatives in Sickle Cell Disease


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407

Hematologists are called upon to provide care for a growing number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), often with little guidance as to what represents best practice. Add to that challenge the high expectations from insurers and hospitals as reimbursement shifts from fee-for-service to value-based models in which payments are tied to the quality of services delivered, as opposed to the volume. In this session, speakers will examine models of care for patients with SCD, focusing on what constitutes high-quality care and how to measure it.

Dr. Joshua Field will discuss five lessons that have led to a model of care for adults with SCD that uses an intensive management strategy and a systematic approach to opioids.

Dr. Jeffrey Glassberg will examine the care of patients with SCD in the emergency department, focusing on the implementation of guideline-adherent care that is gleaned from available literature and expert opinion.

Dr. John Strouse will discuss the measures that are available to determine the quality of health care delivery as well as the measures that have the potential to be successfully implemented in the field of SCD.

Chair:

Joshua J. Field, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI

Speakers:

Joshua J. Field, MD
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI
Lifespan Approaches to Care and Transition in SCD

Jeffrey A. Glassberg, MD
Mount Sinai Medical Center
New York, NY
Improving Care in the Emergency Department for Patients With SCD

John J. Strouse, MD, PhD
Duke University School of Medicine
Durham, NC
Rigorous and Practical Quality Indicators in SCD Care

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Management of Sickle Cell Disease: Present and Future


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407
Saturday, December 9, 2017
4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407

While the morbidity and mortality of sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased in developed countries, the effects of sustained hemolytic anemia and episodic vaso-occlusive events often lead to end-organ complications and failure. In addition to chronic pain, progressive disease of the cardiopulmonary system, central nervous system, and kidneys have the most significant effects on patient morbidity and premature mortality. 

Dr. Mark Gladwin will discuss the development of pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular diastolic heart disease, dysrhythmia, and sudden death in aging patients with SCD. He will also review the current status of screening and novel therapeutic approaches. 

Dr. Elliott Vichinsky will summarize the epidemiology and mechanisms leading to progressive cognitive dysfunction and chronic kidney disease in adults with SCD. He will also provide a summary of the relationship between cerebrovascular infarction and regional atrophy with neurocognitive function. Dr. Vichinsky will review clinically important risk factors and biomarkers of neurocognitive decline and renal disease as well as therapeutic approaches using oxygen supplementation, hydroxyurea, transfusions, revascularization, and stem cell transplantation. Novel approaches for prevention of renal disease will be discussed, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, enothelin receptor blockade, and haptoglobin infusions.

Dr. Angela Rivers will review new therapeutic approaches based on the evolving role of intravascular hemolysis in SCD pathophysiology, including epigenetic induction of fetal hemoglobin, alternate mechanisms of hydroxyurea, anti-polymerization agents, chronic exchange transfusion, selectin inhibition, and lentivirus and CRISPR-CAS9-based gene therapy approaches to induce fetal hemoglobin and correct the beta-S-globin point mutation.

Chair:

Mark Gladwin, MD
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Speakers:

Mark Gladwin, MD
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
Emerging Cardiovascular Complications of SCD

Elliott Vichinsky, MD
UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland
Oakland, CA
Chronic Organ Failure in Adult SCD

Angela Rivers, MD, PhD
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, IL
Evolving Treatment Paradigms in SCD

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Practical Aspects of Acute and Chronic Pain Management in Sickle Cell Disease


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407
Monday, December 11, 2017
2:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407

Pain causes significant suffering for individuals living with sickle cell disease (SCD). Although great strides have been made into the investigation and treatment of acute and chronic SCD pain, development of mechanism-based treatable targets and optimization of the assessment and treatment of pain are essential to improving pain outcomes for individuals with this disease. This session will focus on models of care for pain treatment, pain measurement tools, and mechanism-based therapeutic pain targets.

Dr. Paul Telfer will discuss the spectrum of clinical presentations of acute and chronic pain and challenges to provision of effective, safe, and compassionate pain management. He will provide a critique of current standard of care and offer alternative care pathways, which bypass the emergency department. Dr. Telfer will discuss different methods of opioid use to improve analgesia efficacy and avoid long-term adverse effects as well as new therapeutic approaches for acute pain.

Dr. Amanda Brandow will present an overview of pain measurement tools for SCD. She will discuss the importance of multidimensional pain assessment and review the strengths and limitations of existing pain measurement tools. Dr. Brandow will also discuss investigational pain measurement tools used in the context of SCD pain research and the potential incorporation of these tools into clinical care.

Dr. Kalpna Gupta will present mechanism-based targets that have potential to develop into novel therapeutic strategies to treat and reduce SCD pain, including pharmacologic and complementary medicine approaches. She will summarize the current understanding of the pathobiology of sickle pain, challenges of existent therapy, and recent advancements in multidisciplinary interventions to improve analgesic outcomes.

Chair:

Amanda M. Brandow, DO, MS
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI

Speakers:

Paul Telfer, FRCPath, MD
Barts Health NHS Trust
London, United Kingdom
Optimizing the Care Model for an Uncomplicated Acute Pain Event in SCD

Amanda M. Brandow, DO, MS
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, WI
Pain Measurement Tools in SCD: Where Are We Now?

Kalpna Gupta, PhD
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, MN
Targeting Novel Mechanisms of Pain in SCD

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The Changing Landscape of Hemophilia Therapy


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B405-B407
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 4- B401-B402

This session will focus on the latest progress in hemophilia gene therapy to achieve durable factor expression without immunogenicity, practical strategies that use patient-tailored pharmacokinetics to optimize prophylaxis, and novel non-factor therapeutics that target clot inhibitors to promote hemostasis.

Dr. Lindsey George will provide an overview of progress in gene therapy, including vector capsid efficiency, gene expression cassettes, and therapeutic factor VIII and IX expression. Approaches that have been successful in improving the level and durability of expression while avoiding liver toxicity and vector capsid immune response will be reviewed.

Dr. Alfonso Iorio will discuss the rationale for using pharmacokinetics to individualize prophylaxis regimens for patients with hemophilia. With the recognized variability in bleeding phenotype, even in patients with the same factor level, a practical strategy that tailors prophylaxis regimens to individual physical activity and pharmacokinetic handling of factor will be reviewed.

Dr. Margaret Ragni will focus on novel non-factor therapies that inhibit clot inhibitors (e.g., antithrombin and tissue factor pathway inhibitors) or render clotting factors resistant to regulatory clot inhibitors to achieve hemostasis in hemophilia patients with and without inhibitors. Their mechanisms of action, safety and efficacy profiles, and effects on thrombin generation will be reviewed.

Chair:

Margaret V. Ragni, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Speakers:

Lindsey A. George, MD
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
Gene Therapy Comes of Age

Alfonso Iorio, MD, PhD
McMaster University
Hamilton, ON, Canada
Using Pharmacokinetic Data to Individualize Therapy

Margaret V. Ragni, MD, MPH
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
Hemostatic Therapy for Patients With Inhibitors: Beyond Bypassing Agents

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Therapeutic Apheresis as an Immunomodulatory Tool


Session Offered Twice
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 3-4
Monday, December 11, 2017
7:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 5- Murphy BR 3-4

Apheresis is a term for procedures where blood is removed from a patient, modified or manipulated, and then returned. In this session, the use of plasma exchange (TPE) in two clinical applications as well as the use of extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP), also known as photopheresis, will be discussed as immunomodulatory therapies. Dr Jeffrey L Winters will discuss the role of TPE in the treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) other than thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). TPE has been applied to numerous entities solely based on the response seen in TTP. Does this make sense in such diverse disorders as TMA-Shiga toxin associated, TMA-complement mediated, TMA-hematopoietic stem cell associated, TMA-drug associated, and HELLP syndrome? The role of TPE in these and other TMA will be presented. Dr Jennifer Schneiderman will describe the role of ECP in the treatment of graft-versus-host disease. She will review the procedure as well as discuss the possible mechanisms of action of ECP in modulating the cellular immune system. How does ECP work and what are the risks and benefits of this treatment? Dr Douglas E Gladstone will describe the role of TPE in desensitizing allogeneic stem cell transplant patients who have antibodies to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) present on their donor. He will review the testing required to identify the presence of these antibodies, the protocol behind desensitization, and how testing determines when desensitization has succeeded and transplantation can proceed. Outcomes and experiences from his practice will be presented. This session is jointly sponsored with AABB.

Chair:

Jeffrey L. Winters, MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN

Speakers:

Jeffrey L. Winters, MD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
Plasma Exchange for Thrombotic Microangiopathies Other Than Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

Jennifer Schneiderman, MD, MS
Northwestern Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine
Chicago, IL
Extracorporeal Photopheresis for Graft Versus Host Disease

Douglas E. Gladstone, MD
The Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, MD
Desensitization of Human Leukocyte Antigen Alloimmunized Recipients of Allogeneic Transplant

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Thrombocytopenia in Hospitalized Patients


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B302-B303
Monday, December 11, 2017
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B304-B305

Thrombocytopenia is one of the most commonly encountered problems by inpatient hematologic consultants. In the hospital, thrombocytopenia may vary in importance from a curious epiphenomenon commanding no special attention to a critical clue to a life-threatening blood disorder that requires specialized treatment. The disorders encountered, and the approach to them, differ distinctly from thrombocytopenic disorders seen in the outpatient clinic.

Dr. Marie Scully will provide an approach for distinguishing between different thrombotic microangiopathies, all serious disorders with some common features, yet distinct and requiring quite different therapeutic interventions to accomplish favorable outcomes. Dr. Scully will also provide an update on the latest concepts emerging in this fast-moving field.

Dr. Ryan Zarychanski will review the multiple disorders and underlying mechanisms that lead to thrombocytopenia in one-third to one-half of intensive care unit patients. He will show how trends in platelet count can inform both diagnosis and prognosis. The newest transfusion guidelines and their evidence base will be discussed.

Dr. Lawrence Rice will review the clinical features of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia by briefly tracing the evolution of our understanding. Emphasis will be on diagnosis, when to suspect the disease, when to order serologic tests, and how to interpret them, stressing that it is not only important not to miss the problem but also not to contribute to the epidemic of harmful over-diagnosis.

Chair:

Lawrence Rice, MD
Houston Methodist Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College
Houston, TX

Speakers:

Marie Scully, MD
University College London Hospitals NHS Trust
London, United Kingdom
Approach to the Patient With Thrombotic Microangiopathy

Ryan Zarychanski, MD
Cancercare Manitoba University of Manitoba
Winnipeg, Canada
Assessing Thrombocytopenia in the Intensive Care Unit: The Past, Present, and Future

Lawrence Rice, MD
Houston Methodist Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College
Houston, TX
HITs and Misses of 100 Years of Heparin

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Thrombosis, Devices, and Interventions


Session Offered Twice
Saturday, December 9, 2017
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B304-B305
Sunday, December 10, 2017
7:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Georgia World Congress Center, Bldg B- Lvl 3- B308-B309

Although the mainstay of treatment for both prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is anticoagulation, there are several clinical situations where adjuvant therapies, such as thrombolysis or placement of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter, may be considered. In addition, the increased use of life-saving devices such as ventricular assist devices (VADs) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) pose unique challenges regarding the use of anticoagulants to prevent thrombotic complications.

Dr. Leslie Raffini will review the indications for VADs and ECMO and highlight the physiologic and hemostatic alterations created by these devices. She will discuss current anticoagulation and antiplatelet strategies to prevent thrombosis, both in children and adults. Dr. Raffini will mention potential novel therapeutics that may be useful in the future to help reduce complications.

Dr. Suresh Vedantham will discuss the use of mechanical and pharmacologic agents to disrupt thrombus and restore venous flow to prevent or treat post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in patients with VTE. He will discuss the results from the recently completed ATTRACT Study: a large, randomized clinical trial of pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis to prevent PTS in patients with acute proximal deep vein thrombosis.

Dr. William Geerts will review the epidemiology regarding the use of IVC filters. He will discuss potential indications for IVC filters and examine the evidence to support their use. Dr. Geerts will review potential complications of IVC filters and make recommendations on how to manage patients who have filters placed.

Chair:

Leslie J. Raffini, MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA

Speakers:

Leslie J. Raffini, MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
Anticoagulation With Ventricular Assist Devices and Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Walking the Tightrope

Suresh Vedantham, MD
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO
Thrombectomy and Thrombolysis for the Prevention and Treatment of Post-Thrombotic Syndrome

William Geerts, MD
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre
Toronto, Canada
Inferior Vena Cava Filters

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