American Society of Hematology

Friday Scientific Workshops

The Friday Scientific Workshops are interactive discussions of the latest science developments in a particular field of hematology. The workshops will take place Friday, November 30, 2018, from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m. in San Diego, California.

All registered ASH annual meeting attendees are welcome to attend these workshops. There is no additional fee to attend.

For questions about any of the Friday Scientific Workshops, please contact ASH Scientific Programs Specialist Nneka Iwuchukwu at niwuchukwu@hematology.org.

2018 Friday Scientific Workshops

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Hematology & Aging: Scientific Advances From Sickle Cell Disease to Malignant Hematology

This workshop will discuss scientific findings related to aging and hematologic disorders, spanning topics from bench to bedside.

Co-Chairs: Rebecca L. Olin, MD, and Tanya M. Wildes, MD, MSCI

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Inherited Hematopoietic Malignancies

This workshop will discuss the scientific advances in understanding the pathogenesis of cancer development in individuals and families with germline mutations and predisposition to bone marrow derived malignancies.

Co-Chairs: Lucy Godley, MD, PhD, and Marcin Wlodarski, MD

Integrative Epidemiology: Translating Epidemiology and Basic Science to Maximize Clinical Impact

This workshop will highlight aspects of clinical and molecular epidemiology with emphasis on non-malignant precursor disease states and the factors associated with transformation of hematologic malignancy.

Co-Chairs: Wendy Cozen, DO, and James M. Foran, MD

Myeloid Development

This workshop will examine the latest scientific findings in myeloid biology, with a focus on hematopoietic stem cell biology, leukemogenesis, cell signaling, transcription factors, and epigenetic effects.

Co-Chairs: Leonard Zon, MD, and Ross L. Levine, MD

Tumor Immune Interactions in Lymphoid Malignancies

This workshop will highlight basic and translational immune research as well as potential likely to be important in treating lymphoid malignancies.

Co-Chairs: Stephen M. Ansell, MD, PhD, and Ronald Levy, MD

Friday Scientific Workshop on Hematology and Aging: Scientific Advances From Sickle Cell Disease to Malignant Hematology

As the number of older patients with hematologic disorders dramatically increases, large evidence gaps have become apparent. It is crucial to understand the implications of aging on the development, progression, and treatment of hematologic disorders. This interactive workshop will feature brief didactic presentations from speakers on key topics followed by a few minutes for questions and answers.

The target audience for this workshop includes laboratory-based investigators and clinician researchers with an interest in aging and hematology. However, the wide-ranging content, thematic focus, and interactive format may appeal to a broader audience, including students and trainees.

Workshop Objectives

  • Provide a forum for presentation of novel research related to the biology of aging and hematologic disorders
  • Promote discussion around key items of a newly defined research agenda and call to action, which are based on the past four years of this workshop and were recently published in the Journal of Geriatric Oncology (Rosko et al, 2018)
  • Highlight the areas of overlap and alignment between the hematology and aging research agenda and the ASH Agenda for Hematology Research, including stem cell biology, immunotherapy, and precision medicine
  • Consider opportunities to refine and strengthen ASH's research agenda by incorporating aging-related knowledge gaps
  • Foster collaboration and networking, emphasizing bidirectional translation between pre-clinical and clinical models of aging

If you would like to request a speaking slot in a future workshop, please contact the co-chairs directly.

Co-Chairs:

Rebecca L. Olin, MD, MS
University of California - San Francisco
San Francisco, CA
Rebecca.Olin@ucsf.edu

Tanya M. Wildes, MD, MSCI
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
St. Louis, MO
twildes@wustl.edu

Moderators:

Sickle Cell Disease in the Aging Individual
Brandon Blue, MD
Moffitt Cancer Center
Tampa, FL

Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Heidi Klepin, MD, MS
Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center
Winston Salem, NC

Stem Cell Biology, Transplantation, and Aging
Andrew Artz, MD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL

Multiple Myeloma
Tanya M. Wildes, MD MSCI
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
St. Louis, MO

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Inherited Hematopoietic Malignancies

The importance of identifying individuals with germline mutations in genes predisposing to the development of hematopoietic malignancies is increasingly recognized across all age groups. The World Health Organization's revised leukemia classification scheme now includes a provisional category for genetic disorders with risk for myeloid malignancies. In addition to discussing ongoing research efforts in predisposition syndromes, this workshop will address topics on interdisciplinary approaches in establishing a predisposition clinic. The workshop will also feature discussions about ASH's partnership with the Clinical Genome Resource, which will result in consensus-driven collation of variants in genes associated with inherited risk for myeloid malignancies. The workshop will be conducted with an interactive format, encouraging input from the participants.

Given the expanding role of this topic for clinicians, geneticists, and scientists, the increasing number of recognized syndromes, and the existence of new initiatives, this workshop will appeal to a multidisciplinary audience from many countries.

Workshop Objectives

  • To discuss on-going research efforts in specific predisposition syndromes
  • To strengthen existing and to develop new collaborations in these diseases
  • To discuss interesting pedigrees that have tested negative for all known predisposition alleles to date and to combine pedigrees with similar phenotypes
  • To inform ASH members who are clinicians about these predisposition syndromes and provide contacts to facilitate testing and expand research
  • To discuss sequencing approaches, limitations, timing, and circumstances for variant evaluation

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please identify which session you would like to present during and provide a brief description of your research in the form of a half-page abstract to the program co-chairs by October 15, 2018.

Co-Chairs:

Lucy A. Godley, MD, PhD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
lgodley@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu

Marcin Wlodarski, MD
St. Jude Children's Hospital; University of Freiburg
Memphis, TN; Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
marcin.wlodarski@stjude.org

Moderators:

Establishing a Hematopoietic Predisposition Clinic
Kim Nichols, MD
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Memphis, TN

Lucy Godley, MD, PhD
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL

Identifying Known and Novel Germline Variants
Marcin Wlodarski, MD
St. Jude Children's Hospital; University of Freiburg
Memphis, TN; Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany

Kaan Boztug, MD
Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases
Vienna, Austria

Pedigree Review: Discussion of Interesting Pedigrees and New Variants
Sharon Savage, MD
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD

Ian Majewski, PhD
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute
Melbourne, Australia

Variant Evaluation Including Demonstration of ClinGen Initiative
Hideki Muramatsu, MD, PhD
University of Nagoya
London, United Kingdom

Shannon McWeeney, PhD
Oregon Health & Science University
Portland, OR

Ethical Discussion Surrounding Testing
Inga Hofmann, MD
University of Wisconsin
Madison, WI

Sarah Bannon, MS
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

Exciting New Research Findings
Mary Armanios
Johns Hopkins Hospital
Baltimore, MD

Timothy Olson, MD, PhD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Integrative Epidemiology: Translating Epidemiology and Basic Science to Maximize Clinical Impact

Epidemiologic research is of increasing importance in the era of large-scale genomics and databases, where large numbers of patients must be accumulated to study subtle individual effects that translate into large population effects. Population studies can identify risk predictors for disease, progression, and outcome, which may have a substantial impact on treatment decisions (risk stratification) and prevention. This workshop will provide a forum for epidemiologists working on hematologic neoplasms to present timely research topics from big data to molecular studies (DNA methylation, biomarkers, germline/tumor genetics, microbiome, etc.) applied to large populations. The workshop will address fundamental questions regarding the development and prevention of hematologic malignancies in populations with an emphasis on translational potential. In addition, this workshop will provide an opportunity for basic scientists to present work that could be applied to large-scale population studies, translating from the bench to the real-world population.

This workshop is directed at epidemiologists focused on hematologic neoplasms as well as basic and clinical scientists interested in real-world population applications of their findings. The workshop will also appeal strongly to trainees in clinical hematology-oncology who are interested in expanding their careers to include an epidemiologic focus.

Workshop Objectives

  • To provide a unique forum at the ASH annual meeting to discuss and present advances in the field of epidemiology of hematologic malignancies
  • To extend novel observations generated from epidemiology studies to translational studies with direct clinical relevance and to provide an opportunity to integrate new molecular or bench findings into population studies
  • To develop a roadmap and future directions that advance the study of epidemiology, particularly including prevention strategies for lymphoid and myeloid malignancy and associated diseases
  • To establish a forum that enhances current collaborations, develops new collaborations, and provides opportunities for career development and research for trainees and junior investigators in the field of epidemiology of hematologic malignancy

The workshop will be comprised of two consecutive sessions, each with nine speakers giving focused, 10- to 15-minute, cutting-edge presentations on the clinical and molecular epidemiology of hematologic malignancy. The presentations will include audience/attendee interaction and discussion, followed by a panel discussion at the end of each session to generate collaboration and translation.

Co-Chairs:

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA
wcozen@usc.edu

James Foran, MD
Mayo Clinic Florida
Jacksonville, FL
foran.james@mayo.edu

Moderators:

New Findings From Population Studies of B-Cell Malignancies
James Cerhan, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
cerhan.james@mayo.edu

Ola Landgren, MD, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
landgrec@mskcc.org

Wendy Cozen, DO, MPH
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA
wcozen@usc.edu

Epidemiology of Myeloid Malignancy: Precursor States and Risk Factor Update
Lindsay Morton, PhD
National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD
mortonli@mail.nih.gov

James Foran, MD
Mayo Clinic Florida
Jacksonville, FL
foran.james@mayo.edu

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Myeloid Development

This workshop will examine the latest scientific findings in myeloid biology in a highly interactive environment that permits exchange of ideas among investigators. The workshop will focus on topics such as hematopoietic stem cell biology, leukemogenesis, cell signaling, transcription factors, epigenetic effects, and other topics related to myeloid biology. Each session leader will briefly summarize the current questions facing the field and then lead discussions on how best to answer those questions. New findings or novel techniques that provide insight into these questions will be an essential part of all discussions. The research presented at this workshop will also focus on the use of molecular biology and biochemistry tools, as well as animal models, to address the core topics; it will not include any purely clinical, epidemiologic, or population-based approaches.

The format of this workshop will include brief didactic sessions followed by a couple of minutes for questions and answers.

This workshop is directed at laboratory-based investigators, but the broad-ranging content and highly interactive format is suitable for clinically oriented investigators and is particularly appealing to young investigators, as it provides the opportunity to interact directly with experts in the field.

Workshop Objectives

  • Discuss the latest scientific developments in hematopoietic stem cell biology, leukemogenesis, cell signaling, transcription factors, epigenetic effects, and other topics related to myeloid biology
  • Have interactive presentations by world-class scientists
  • Provide young investigators opportunities to interact with world-renowned experts in the field

If you would like to request a speaking slot at this workshop, please contact the co-chairs directly.

Co-Chairs:

Leonard Zon, MD
Harvard University
Boston, MA
leonard.zon@enders.tch.harvard.edu

Ross Levine, MD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY
leviner@mskcc.org

Moderators:

Stem Cells
Patricia Ernst, PhD
University of Colorado
Denver, CO
patricia.ernst@ucdenver.edu

Signaling and Developmental Hematopoiesis
Claudia Lengerke, PhD
University of Basel
Basel, Switzerland
claudia.lengerke@unibas.ch

Myeloid Malignancies
Ben Ebert, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, MA
benjamin_ebert@dfci.harvard.edu

Transcription Factors
Ulrich Steidl, MD, PhD
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Bronx, NY
ulrich.steidl@einstein.yu.edu

New Investigators
Nancy Speck, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA
nancyas@upenn.edu

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Friday Scientific Workshop on Tumor Immune Interactions in Lymphoid Malignancies

The area of immunotherapy in lymphoid malignancies has exploded in recent years. Multiple new immune therapies are in development in lymphoproliferative diseases, and this exciting progress has been due to an increased understanding of the tumor microenvironment and tumor-immune interactions in these diseases. This proliferation of scientific knowledge has led to multiple potential new treatments, including new immune checkpoint blockade therapies, novel T-cell approaches, agents targeting monocytes, and macrophages, as well as new approaches inhibiting immune receptors and cytokine signaling.

The target audience for this workshop is laboratory-based investigators who are interested in myeloid biology. The workshop’s presentations and discussions focus solely on the basic science of myeloid development; there are no presentations on clinical/treatment strategies. Attendees benefit from interactive presentations by world-class scientists. The workshop reinforces the appeal of attending the ASH annual meeting by scientists from around the world, and it can serve as an introduction to the scientific content that will be presented at the ASH annual meeting.

Workshop Objectives

  • Highlight novel basic science and translational immune research in lymphoid malignancies that are likely to translate in the near future to clinically relevant therapies, biomarkers, or correlative science
  • Feature new methods of immune monitoring, as well as potential future therapies or therapeutic targets that are likely to be important in lymphoid malignancies

The workshop's aim is to have scientists, translational researchers, and clinicians "hear it here first" when it comes to the next big thing in the management of lymphoid diseases. This workshop will be highly interactive and somewhat speculative (though based on science), with a strong focus on future translation immune-related research into the clinic.

Co-Chairs:

Stephen M. Ansell, MD, PhD
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN
ansell.stephen@mayo.edu

Ronald Levy, MD
Stanford University
Stanford, CA
levy@stanford.edu

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