American Society of Hematology

Hematologic Drug Shortages Continue; ASH Advocacy is Critical

Published on: March 22, 2012

During the past few months, ASH has been pleased that several shortages of hematology drugs have been mitigated, but the Society remains concerned that many ongoing shortages continue and new shortages are reported weekly.

ASH has endorsed several bills (S. 296/ H.R. 2245, The Preserving Access to Life-Saving Medications Act and H.R. 3839, the Drug Shortage Prevention Act) that would give FDA the authority and resources it needs to effectively prevent and mitigate future drug shortages. It is expected that drug shortage legislation would be bundled or incorporated into a larger bill known as the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) rather than being passed as individual bills. The PDUFA legislation is planned to be considered this summer and initial drafts are being circulated.

As Congress begins drafting PDUFA legislation, it is critical that Members of Congress continue to hear from their physician constituents about the need to support drug shortage legislation. Earlier this week, ASH's Committee on Government Affairs met with congressional offices to explain the negative effect these problems have on hematologists and their patients. In particular, ASH members highlighted the critical shortages of drugs used to treat patients with hematologic malignancies. ASH urged Members of Congress to support The Preserving Access to Life-Saving Medications Act and the Drug Shortage Prevention Act. All ASH members are encouraged to participate in the Society's advocacy efforts to combat drug shortages by visiting the ASH Advocacy Center today. 

Read more information about the status of additional hematologic drug shortages, ASH advocacy efforts, and resources for physicians dealing with shortages. If you have any additional questions and/or concerns about any hematologic drug shortages, please contact ASH Government Relations Manager, Stephanie Kaplan at 202-776-0544 or skaplan@hematology.org.

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